Author Topic: Ghaznavids: Khusraw Malik (1160-1186) Jital (Album-1663; Deyell-116; Tye-117.3)  (Read 2322 times)

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Offline Quant.Geek

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Ghaznavids: Khusraw Malik (1160-1186) AR Jital (Album-1663; Deyell-116; Tye-117.3)

With all the recent jitals posted, I figured it was time to post this recent acquisition :).  Khusraw Malik was the last ruler of the Ghaznavids before being conquered by the Ghurids.  Khusraw Malik and his son, Bahram Shah, were treacherously murdered in 1186 even though they were under the protection of a treaty to surrender.  Thus ended the two hundred year rule of the Ghaznavids...

Reference

Gough, Jana et al, History of Civilizations of Central Asia, Volume IV, UNESCO Publishing, 1998

Obv: Blundered Nagari script, Rajput bull left.
Rev: Arabic Legend in five lines: Malik / al-sultan / al-a'zam / abu'l-malik / Khusru

A high-resolution image of this coin is available at FORVM Ancient Coins

« Last Edit: September 27, 2014, 08:33:52 PM by THCoins »
A gallery of my coins can been seen at FORVM Ancient Coins

Offline THCoins

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This is an extraordinary fine specimen for the type. Thanks for showing !
I don't know if it is a coincidence that there seems to be more interest for Jitals. It is a fascinating series. And luckily, prices are still so low that one can easily aquire multiple specimen. As i think a collector needs more than one of these if he wants to grab the evolution of this series.
On your specimen it is interesting what has happened to the Sri Samanta inscription. In fact, with two or three earlier specimen one can observe this evolution over time. I think it is amazing how the Bull has evolved into a kubistic bumblebee !

Offline Quant.Geek

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Thanks Anthony!  I fell in love with it the first time I spotted it.  These jitals are so under-rated with a very affordable price range.  And to top it off, the history is very rich.  With the cost of collecting Central and South Asian coins going up and up, these coins are a satisfying treat for the collector and his pockets  ;D.  The bull vs. bumblebee analogy is spot on.  Fascinating that the iconography degraded so much as it is such an iconic figure.  I can understand the legend degrading, but the bull???!!!?
A gallery of my coins can been seen at FORVM Ancient Coins

Offline THCoins

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Well, i did not do a systematic study on this but i can thing of the following mechanisms responsible for this degradation:
- These were mass products, usually copied form existing examples. If you look at the specimen of his predecessor Mu'izz al-din Khushraw Shah there may be an ongoing process of degeneration of both text and bull over decades.
- This type was probably minted in Kurraman, for which i see no earlier bull jitals. So this was probably a new venture for this mint. Contemporary specimen attributed to Lahore seem to show a better defined bull. Also later Ghorid bull jitals from Kurraman look a bit better in design.

Offline Figleaf

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There is another option, defended by Cavaros in the case of Balkan Celtic coins: fashion, taste or culture change. If a certain design becomes attached to an unpopular ruler, an oppressor or an enemy, it is changed to reflect homegrown ideas.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline THCoins

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In my previous post i indicated that later Jitals from Kurraman were stylistically less crude than the topicstart coin.

To illustrate that here is a quite similar Jital attributed to Kurraman mint. Now issued under the authority of Ala-ud-din Muhammad Kwarezm Shah (1200-1220 AD). At least this is recognizable as a bull again.
Billon 15 mm, 3.15 gr, Tye 297.2