Author Topic: Heavy coins  (Read 11058 times)

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BC Numismatics

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Heavy coins
« on: January 14, 2009, 07:58:32 PM »
Was this the coin that is/was listed in the Guinness Book of Records as the world's largest coin (I'm remembering from the late 1970s), a cast of which was held by the British Museum but which had been "lost" in the meantime?



Martin,
  The world record for the largest (& heaviest!) coin is now held by the Canadian Coinzilla - the $1,000,000 gold Maple Leaf bullion medal-coin,which weighs 100 Kilos.You certainly wouldn't want to drop the Coinzilla on your foot,eh!

The Coinzilla was a nominee for Krause's 'Coin of the Year',which was won by the Hungarian medal-coin.

Aidan.

Offline Figleaf

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Heavy coins
« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2009, 09:20:03 PM »
Don't you find it strange to call that thing a coin? A stunt, maybe, or a joke or an attention getter, an artifact but I can't think of anything more positive. It has no history, no purpose, is of no use to no one and doesn't have anything to do with real coins except that it's round and metallic.

Compare that with a 19.7 kg copper plate coin struck in 1644 kept in the Swedish Royal Coin cabinet (Kungliga Myntakabinettet). Sweden has a long tradition of large copper coins, their purpose was to help the king of Sweden sell copper, since he owned the richest copper mine in the world, the Stora Kopparberg (the company still exist, but under a different name, the mine is now a museum). It was used for payments in Sweden so that the international copper price wouldn't sag under the weight of Swedish copper production The coin on the picture is a smaller and later colleague.

Peter
« Last Edit: January 14, 2009, 09:32:19 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

BC Numismatics

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Heavy coins.
« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2009, 09:26:29 PM »
Peter,
  There were 10 examples of the Coinzilla struck,& they were sold off at C$3,000,000 when they came out.In fact,5 of them were already presold.

The Swedish plate money is definitely a different kettle of fish.Imagine having one of those in your bedroom.You'd need to build a massive strongroom underground (kind of like a bunker) to store your coin collection,especially if they are containing quite a few of those bulky coins.

Aidan.

Offline thelawnet

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Re: Heavy coins.
« Reply #3 on: January 14, 2009, 09:48:37 PM »
The Swedish plate money is definitely a different kettle of fish.Imagine having one of those in your bedroom.You'd need to build a massive strongroom underground (kind of like a bunker) to store your coin collection,especially if they are containing quite a few of those bulky coins.

For a 20kg coin?

Heavy coins are definitely interesting, and usually seem to come about as a result of shortages of precious metals.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Heavy coins
« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2009, 10:29:24 PM »
Those giant gold pieces - first a big one from Austria, then an even bigger one from Canada - are marketing gags. "Look what we can do", that's about it.

Hmm, I wonder what Rasmus Woxholt (Norwegian Business Security Council) thinks about huge coins.  In 2005 he suggested, and I don't think he was joking, that it should be "as impractical and elaborate as possible" to use cash. http://www.aftenposten.no/english/local/article1103567.ece  He wanted to do away with the 1000 kr note and suggested "limiting notes to small amounts, and even toys with the idea of replacing these with large, heavy coins" ...

Norwegian plate money anyone? ;D

Christian

Offline thelawnet

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Re: Heavy coins
« Reply #5 on: January 14, 2009, 10:34:13 PM »
Those giant gold pieces - first a big one from Austria, then an even bigger one from Canada - are marketing gags. "Look what we can do", that's about it.

Hmm, I wonder what Rasmus Woxholt (Norwegian Business Security Council) thinks about huge coins.  In 2005 he suggested, and I don't think he was joking, that it should be "as impractical and elaborate as possible" to use cash. http://www.aftenposten.no/english/local/article1103567.ece  He wanted to do away with the 1000 kr note and suggested "limiting notes to small amounts, and even toys with the idea of replacing these with large, heavy coins" ...

The other way of doing it is with coins of extremely low value, such as chinese cash in strings of 2000.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Heavy coins
« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2009, 10:43:19 PM »
Rasmus Woxholt is a police inspector, not an economist. The cost of making payments are a drag on economic growth. For small amounts, cash is the easiest and cheapest way to pay. Crime is also a drag on the economy. From there on, you can easily set up a set of equations and calculate if a note should disappear.

Before you have done that, you wil find that the market has already stopped using the note. This is why notes above €50 are used only in member states where payments are expensive or cumbersome or both. Actions such as Mr Woxholt's, will, if they are successful, either act like a (small) tax on payments or be superfluous. As usual, the cost of the proposed measure is neither known nor explained.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Bimat

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Re: Heavy coins
« Reply #7 on: February 07, 2009, 09:54:47 AM »
Hi Aidan,
Which coins you consider as heavy coins? I mean what should be the minimum weight of the coin so as to consider it as a heavy coin?
Aditya
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BC Numismatics

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Re: Heavy coins
« Reply #8 on: February 07, 2009, 10:06:07 AM »
Hi Aidan,
Which coins you consider as heavy coins? I mean what should be the minimum weight of the coin so as to consider it as a heavy coin?
Aditya

Aditya,
  It is a bit hard to say,but I reckon anything weighing 1 Kilo or more could be classed as a heavy coin,or in Canada's case,the world's heaviest medal-coin (100 Kilos).

Aidan.

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Re: Heavy coins
« Reply #9 on: February 07, 2009, 10:15:58 AM »
Aditya,
  It is a bit hard to say,but I reckon anything weighing 1 Kilo or more could be classed as a heavy coin,or in Canada's case,the world's heaviest medal-coin (100 Kilos).

Aidan.
Hi Aidan,
1 Kilo is a very high limit,I think.There are a few issues where weight of the coin is above 1 kg.Also,these coins can not be collected as a part of collection,since their price is really huge.For a thematic collection of coins with "heavy coins" as a theme,I think the enough minimum weight is 30 Grams (or even less?)

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline a3v1

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Re: Heavy coins
« Reply #10 on: February 07, 2009, 10:31:50 AM »
For a thematic collection of coins with "heavy coins" as a theme,I think the enough minimum weight is 30 Grams (or even less?)
Correct, Aditya!
Any coin of over 30 grams (or even 25 grams) is too heavy to carry around in your pocket or purse, especially if you have more than one.
The main purpose of a coin is that it can circulate and can be used for payments.
Anything weighing 1 Kilo or more shouldn't be called a coin, even if it is round and metallic.
Regards,
a3v1
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Money is like body fat: If there's too much of it, it always is in the wrong places.

BC Numismatics

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Heavy coins.
« Reply #11 on: February 07, 2009, 10:34:43 AM »
A3v1,
  Australia used to get Kookaburra silver bullion medal-coins weighing 1 Kilo struck at the Perth Mint.That is pretty heavy in itself.

Aidan.

Offline a3v1

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Re: Heavy coins.
« Reply #12 on: February 07, 2009, 10:44:57 AM »
Australia used to get Kookaburra silver bullion medal-coins weighing 1 Kilo struck at the Perth Mint.That is pretty heavy in itself.
Aidan,
I know, I know!! And it is an absurdity regarding these bulky silver ingots as coins, even if they are circular.
Regards,
a3v1
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Money is like body fat: If there's too much of it, it always is in the wrong places.

Offline Bimat

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Re: Heavy coins
« Reply #13 on: March 13, 2009, 05:29:13 PM »
Just found two more heavy coins-both from Finland.
The first one is KM# 111 5 Euro-weight about 20.1 Grams. (subject :Ice hockey)
Second is KM# 118 5 Euro-19.8 Grams.
Both coins have a mintage of 1,50,000 and 1,70,000.But I am doubtful whether they are really found in circulation.KM# 123 and 131 are also too heavy to carry them.Has anybody seen these coins in circulation?
And  these issues must not be a legal tender in entire Euro-zone,though they are general bimetallic issues and not the silver.(If I am not wrong?)

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline Harald

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Re: Heavy coins
« Reply #14 on: March 13, 2009, 07:11:35 PM »
What would be the heaviest coin that really circulates (i.e. is used for everyday payments) ?
The Swiss 5 francs is about 14g. That probably already brings it to the shortlist. But there are probably others.

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Harald
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