Author Topic: Finland: Wildlife series of the 1990s  (Read 5188 times)

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Offline <k>

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Finland: Wildlife series of the 1990s
« on: February 13, 2014, 08:08:05 PM »
Before the 1990s, as Figleaf points out in his topic Finland in coins, Finnish coin designs were mainly heraldic, with the odd stylised tree here and there. In the 1990s, however, a new design series was introduced, featuring the country's wildlife. It had a certain charm, and it looked rather different from the many other wildlife-themed circulation coin series of other countries.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Finland: Wildlife series of the 1990s
« Reply #1 on: February 13, 2014, 08:09:03 PM »






The first 10 pennia coin of the new series was issued in 1990.

The obverse features the lily-of-the-valley (Convallaria majalis), Finland's national flower.

 
« Last Edit: July 01, 2017, 09:25:07 PM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Finland: Wildlife series of the 1990s
« Reply #2 on: February 13, 2014, 08:10:17 PM »


The reverse of the 10 pennia coin depicts a honeycomb pattern.

 
« Last Edit: July 01, 2017, 09:25:28 PM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Finland: Wildlife series of the 1990s
« Reply #3 on: February 13, 2014, 08:15:29 PM »
The first new 50 pennia design was also released in 1990.

The reverse features haircap moss (Polytrichum juniperinum), which is common in the Finnish countryside.
« Last Edit: July 01, 2017, 09:26:48 PM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Finland: Wildlife series of the 1990s
« Reply #4 on: February 13, 2014, 08:17:52 PM »






The obverse of the 50 pennia depicts the Finnish brown bear (Ursus arctos), Finland's national animal.

 
« Last Edit: July 01, 2017, 09:29:54 PM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Finland: Wildlife series of the 1990s
« Reply #5 on: February 13, 2014, 08:22:28 PM »


The 1 markka coin of the new series was issued in 1993.
The obverse features the crowned lion from the Finnish coat of arms.
 
 
« Last Edit: July 01, 2017, 09:32:00 PM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Finland: Wildlife series of the 1990s
« Reply #6 on: February 13, 2014, 08:23:31 PM »


The reverse of the 1 markka. Does the motif have any significance?

 
« Last Edit: July 01, 2017, 09:32:55 PM by <k> »
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Re: Finland: Wildlife series of the 1990s
« Reply #7 on: February 13, 2014, 08:28:00 PM »






The new 5 markkaa design was released in 1992.

The obverse features a Saimaa ringed seal, with a seagull in the background.

From Wikipedia:

The ringed seal (Pusa hispida) is an earless seal (family: Phocidae) inhabiting the Arctic and sub-Arctic regions. The ringed seal is a relatively small seal, rarely greater than 1.5 m in length, with a distinctive patterning of dark spots surrounded by light grey rings, whence its common name

The Saimaa ringed seal (Pusa hispida saimensis) is a subspecies of ringed seal (Pusa hispida). They are among the most endangered seals in the world, having a total population of only about 310 individuals. The only existing population of these seals is found in Lake Saimaa, Finland (hence the name). The population is descended from ringed seals that were separated from the rest when the land rose after the last ice age. This seal, along with the Ladoga Seal and the Baikal Seal, is one of the few living freshwater seals.


 
« Last Edit: July 01, 2017, 09:36:54 PM by <k> »
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Re: Finland: Wildlife series of the 1990s
« Reply #8 on: February 13, 2014, 08:29:29 PM »


The reverse of the 5 markkaa coin shows a dragonfly hovering over some waterlilies.

 
« Last Edit: July 01, 2017, 09:37:25 PM by <k> »
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Re: Finland: Wildlife series of the 1990s
« Reply #9 on: February 13, 2014, 08:31:56 PM »






The new 10 markkaa design was released in 1993.
The obverse features a capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus).

 
« Last Edit: July 01, 2017, 09:41:30 PM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Finland: Wildlife series of the 1990s
« Reply #10 on: February 13, 2014, 08:35:42 PM »






The fruit and leaves of the rowan tree (Sorbus aucuparia) appear on the reverse of the 10 markkaa coin.

 
« Last Edit: July 01, 2017, 09:42:48 PM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Finland: Wildlife series of the 1990s
« Reply #11 on: February 13, 2014, 08:39:28 PM »


The last examples of this design series were issued in the year 2000. Finland adopted the euro in 2001, so you may look back at the 1990s series with fond nostalgia. However, the higher issues of the Finnish euro series, and some of the commemoratives, carry designs of a very similar character to some of these coins.
« Last Edit: July 01, 2017, 09:43:10 PM by <k> »
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Offline chrisild

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Re: Finland: Wildlife series of the 1990s
« Reply #12 on: February 14, 2014, 10:39:38 PM »
The bear and seal designs I like. :)  What I find interesting, and a little odd maybe, is that four of these five coins are dedicated to seasons: According to the Schön catalog (and I have read that elsewhere too), the 10 penniä coin represents "spring", the bear (50 p) is "winter", the 5 mk coin is "summer", and the 10 mk piece is about "fall". Only the poor 1 markka coin has no season assigned to it ... No idea what that pattern means; it reminds me of "Scandinavian" pullovers. :D

Now whether the one on the coin has any special meaning, I don't know. But I like the idea of an inner circle that is a little "eccentric", not precisely in the middle ...

Christian

Offline <k>

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Re: Finland: Wildlife series of the 1990s
« Reply #13 on: February 15, 2014, 12:18:55 PM »
That's an interesting concept, and one I didn't know about. So to make it plain, we have:

Spring: 10 penniä.  Obverse: Lily-of-the-valley. Reverse: Honeycomb.

Summer: 5 markkaa.  Obverse: Seal.  Reverse: Dragonfly and water lilies.

Autumn: 10 markkaa.  Obverse: Capercaillie.  Reverse: Fruit and leaves of the rowan tree.

Winter: 50 penniä.  Obverse: Bear.  Reverse: Haircap moss.


I can imagine why plants, or their fruit and flowers, are associated with certain seasons. I'm less sure, however, why the seal should be associated with summer and the bear with winter. I always imagined that brown bears hibernated in winter.
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Finland: Wildlife series of the 1990s
« Reply #14 on: February 15, 2014, 12:33:17 PM »
Hadn't made the connection either, but it is a nice idea. Maybe the thick fur is something the bears sport in winter. The seal rests on a bare rock, uncovered with snow. Seals love to take sun baths. If I remember correctly, they wage a continuous combat against vitamin D shortage.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.