Mewar, Bhilwara mint, see C#3.2 for comparison

Started by asm, December 16, 2008, 05:43:14 AM

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asm

Please help identify this coin.
"It Is Better To Light A Candle Than To Curse The Darkness"

Oesho

There are very few indications or pointers for the attribution of this copper takka. The most plausible suggestion might be that it is a Bhilwara takka (ref.: C#3.2). The prominent leave mark on this coin is of the flan, but part of the stem may be seen to the left of Shah right on the edge of the obverse. Curiously is a date above the top line on the obverse. It is in Nagari figures 19xx and must be dated in the Samvat era. Perhaps with the coin in hand more of the might be recognised, but from the scan it is not possible.

asm

Do I see a small Flag type mark to the left of the Numerals. Is this significant. Would a higher resolution scan of the coin after a wash help see the image better?
"It Is Better To Light A Candle Than To Curse The Darkness"

Rangnath

Scans can flatten an image. Sometimes, with the play of sunlight, more can be revealed.  Try taking photographs of the coin with morning or afternoon sun light.  Will that bring out more detail in the right side of the obverse?  Perhaps.
richie

asm

Richie, thanks for the tip. The information shows slightly better. Unfortunately due to cloudy wheather, I have made use of low intencity flash. Does this effect the quality of details seen? Would the details be better seen in a mix of incandecent and flurocent light with  or without flash?

Can more information be noticed on the photo now? Also my earlier question: is there any significance of the small flag like mark to the left of the nagri '19'?

Amit
"It Is Better To Light A Candle Than To Curse The Darkness"

Rangnath

Nice job Amit! 
I'm not an expert on photographing coins. 
You now have more detail on the right side of the obverse.  There is some glare from the flash.  You might get better results with sunlight at a time of day to get just a bit more shadow.  Try taking shots from different angles and see what workds best.  A mix of light sources works well to get good color. I'm sure a technician could duplicate the natural warm color produced with use of sunlight, but I don't have the equipment.
richie

Rangnath

The more I look at this coin, the more I see it as a C#3.2 of Mewar.  Thanks Oesho.
richie

asm

Quote from: Rangnath on January 22, 2010, 05:29:47 PM
The more I look at this coin, the more I see it as a C#3.2 of Mewar.  Thanks Oesho.
richie
Thanks Richie for digging out this thread. I think Oesho is as usual bang on target. The stem of the leaf is seen along with the base of the leaf. However the date is a feature I have not seen in any of the many Bhilwara Pisa that I have.
Should the question mark after Mewar be removed?
Amit
"It Is Better To Light A Candle Than To Curse The Darkness"

Salvete

I agree.  I have never seen a date on a Bhilwara paisa.  Might it be possible that the flag is a Persian '17'?  Not that it necessarily helps identify the coin.  Sorry.
Salvete
Ultimately, our coins are only comprehensible against the background of their historical context.

Rangnath

Doubts are vanquished, question marks obliterated. Thank you all.
richie

Salvete

I apologise for digging this thread out of its grave, but I have one short note to add, please.  The flag (or whatever) mark above the 'A' of Shah is exactly above the position where the 'sunray' marks are usually found hanging down from the dividing line on rupees attributed to Chitor.  On just one of my Bhilwara copper coins there is that (usually five-stroke) 'sunray' mark ABOVE the line (looking like a tuft of grass), just where the 'flag' is seen on the example above.  The 'flag' may therefore be the vestiges (or forerunner) of just such a mark?   I have not seen one of these takkas with the more usual hanging 'sunray' mark.  I also still have not seen another such coin with a date.  This is an infinitely variable series, but the one shown here is very unusual, in my limited experience.  The Mewar coinage has not had much attention for many years, and it might benefit from another look, maybe.  Especially the rupees.
Salvete
Ultimately, our coins are only comprehensible against the background of their historical context.