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Georgia: post-Soviet independence coinage

Started by <k>, January 13, 2014, 08:54:32 PM

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<k>


In 1801 Tsarist Russia annexed the last of the independent lands of Georgia. After the collapse of the Russian Empire, Georgia enjoyed a brief period of independence from 1918 to 1921. However, the Soviet Union occupied the country in 1921 and incorporated it into the USSR in 1922. Georgia regained its independence in 1991, after the collapse of the Soviet Union. The newly independent country issued its first coinage in 1993.

 
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<k>

#1


The common obverse of the coins depicts the Borjgali.

From Wikipedia:

The Borjgali is a Georgian symbol of the Sun with seven rotating wings over the Christian Tree of Life and is related to the Mesopotamian symbols of eternity. It is usually depicted within the circle that symbolizes the Universe. The roots of the Tree go into the "past" and its palm-like branches are for the "future". The Tree itself symbolizes the continuity between past, present and the future. The Borjgali is usually placed above the tree and symbolizes the Sun, eternal movement and life.

 
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#2


Wall ornaments from Svetitskhoveli Cathedral.






The reverse of the 1 tetri coin features stylised grapes, as seen on the wall ornaments above. Georgia is known for its excellent vineyards.

   
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#3


The reverse of the 2 tetri coin depicts a peacock, from the façade of Svetitskhoveli cathedral.






The peacock on the façade of Svetitskhoveli cathedral.






Svetitskhoveli cathedral.

From Wikipedia:

Svetitskhoveli Cathedral (literally, "the Living Pillar Cathedral") is a Georgian Orthodox cathedral located in the historical town of Mtskheta, Georgia, 20 km (12 miles) northwest of the nation's capital of Tbilisi.

Svetitskhoveli, known as the burial site of Christ's mantle, has long been the principal Georgian church and remains one of the most venerated places of worship to this day. It presently functions as the seat of the archbishop of Mtskheta and Tbilisi, who is at the same time Catholicos-Patriarch of All Georgia.

The current cathedral was built in the 11th century by the Georgian architect Arsukisdze, though the site itself is even older dating back to the early 4th century and is surrounded by a number of legends associated primarily with the early Christian traditions.

It is the second largest church building in the country, after the recently consecrated Tbilisi Holy Trinity Cathedral, and is listed as an UNESCO World Heritage Site along with other historical monuments of Mtskheta.


 
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#4






The reverse of the 5 tetri coin is graced by the famous gold lion statuette from Alazani valley. It dates to around 2000 BC and is held at the National Museum of Georgia.

 
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#5


The Gelati monastery, Kutaisi, Georgia.

From Wikipedia:

A large majority of Georgia's population (83.9% in 2002) practices Orthodox Christianity. The Georgian Orthodox Church is one of the world's most ancient Christian Churches, and claims apostolic foundation by Saint Andrew. In the first half of the 4th century, Christianity was adopted as the state religion of Iberia (present-day Kartli, or Eastern Georgia), following the missionary work of Saint Nino of Cappadocia.





The tondo depicting Saint Mamas of Caesarea, from the Gelati monastery. It dates back to the 14th or 15th century.






The 10 tetri design is based on the famous tondo.

 
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#6


The 20 tetri features a red deer, from a painting by artist Niko Pirosmani.




The Georgian primitivist artist Niko Pirosmani (1862-1918), as he appears on a Georgian 1 lari banknote.

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#7


The Samtavisi Cathedral is an 11th century Georgian Orthodox cathedral in eastern Georgia, in the region of Shida Kartli, some 45km from the nation's capital Tbilisi.






The griffin that appears on the façade of Samtavisi Cathedral.






The 50 tetri coin depicts the Samtavisi Cathedral griffin.

 
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

The 1993 coinage formed a fine set, then, with a highly distinctive style that drew in part on Georgia's Christian heritage.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Figleaf

Thank you. A fine set indeed and nicely illuminated with those very well chosen pictures. I sometimes forget how much careful thought goes into the design of coins.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

<k>

Thanks to our Georgian member, David Mikeladze, for the following information about the designers of this beautiful coin set:

Obverse: by Nodar and Bachana Malazonia.
Reverse (surface with denominations)  - by  famous Georgian sculptor and painter - Elguja Amashukeli.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Arminius


<k>

The current coins seen together.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Pabitra

Has the set or some coins minted after 2006 or is the date frozen?

<k>

2006 seems to be the latest year shown. Whether the dates are frozen or they prefer to use banknotes, I do not know.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.