Author Topic: Slovenia: post-Yugoslav coinage  (Read 5079 times)

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Offline <k>

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Slovenia: post-Yugoslav coinage
« on: November 23, 2013, 10:16:32 PM »
Before World War I, most ethnic Slovenes lived within Austria-Hungary, while a minority lived in Italy. After World War I and the dissolution of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, Slovenia and Croatia opted to join with Serbia and Montenegro in the “Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes”. In 1929 the new country officially changed its name to Yugoslavia (“Land of the South Slavs”).

Yugoslavia was inherently unstable because of the various differences of its nationalities. Slovenes and Croats were mainly Catholic, and both used the Latin alphabet. However, they spoke different languages and could not understand one another without tuition. Croats and Serbs spoke essentially the same language, but the Serbs, like the Montenegrins and Macedonians, were Orthodox, not Catholic, and they used the Cyrillic alphabet. Then there were the Bosnian Muslims, the ethnic Albanians of Kosovo and parts of Montenegro and Macedonia, as well as a Hungarian minority in Vojvodina, northern Serbia.

Serbia was the dominant nationality within the heavily centralised country, and this was resented by the other nationalities. Ethnic tensions rose throughout the 1920s and 1930s, and Hitler used these to divide and rule Yugoslavia after he invaded it in 1941. He split Slovenia between southern Austria and northern Italy, later occupying the Italian share after the Italians switched to the Allied side in 1943.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Slovenia: post-Yugoslav coinage
« Reply #1 on: November 23, 2013, 10:16:53 PM »

Marshal Tito.



After Tito’s communist Partisans liberated Yugoslavia from the Nazis, Tito turned Yugoslavia into a unified federal communist state. He avoided the brutal oppression often seen in other communist countries, and he was careful to respect the different nationalities of his citizens. His popularity with the majority of Yugoslavs meant that he was a unifying force, but after his death ethnic tensions rose once more.

 
« Last Edit: July 09, 2017, 12:08:12 AM by <k> »
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Re: Slovenia: post-Yugoslav coinage
« Reply #2 on: November 23, 2013, 10:17:13 PM »
In 1987 Slobodan Milosevic began to champion Serb domination within Yugoslavia. This, combined with the new freedoms in Communist Europe (a response to the democratic reforms of Soviet president Mikhail Gorbachev), caused a rise in nationalism in the other republics of Yugoslavia, who did not wish to be dominated by Milosevic and his Serbs. Additionally, the Slovenes, along with the Croats, were the most modern and prosperous of the Yugoslav republics, and they resented having to subsidise the other republics.

From Wikipedia (abridged):

In September 1989 numerous constitutional amendments were passed to introduce parliamentary democracy to Slovenia. On 7 March 1990, the Slovenian Assembly changed the official name of the state to the "Republic of Slovenia". In April 1990 the first democratic national election in Slovenia took place, and the united opposition movement DEMOS led by Jože Pučnik emerged victorious.

On 23 December 1990 the electorate voted for a sovereign and independent Slovenia. On 25 June 1991 Slovenia declared its independence, and Croatia did likewise on the same day. On 27 June in the early morning, the Yugoslav People's Army (YNA) dispatched its forces to Slovenia, leading to The Ten-Day War. Several YNA troops deserted, as they did not want to kill fellow Yugoslavs.

Despite this, the YNA thought the Slovenes would back down, but Slovenia had made serious military preparations in anticipation of just such a conflict. The world watched in amazement as the mighty YNA was forced to leave little Slovenia. On 7 July the Brijuni Agreement was signed, implementing a truce and a three-month halt of the enforcement of Slovenia's independence. At the end of the month, the last YNA soldiers left Slovenia.

In December 1991 a new constitution was adopted, followed in 1992 by laws on denationalisation and privatization. The European Union recognised Slovenia as an independent state on 15 January 1992, and it gained United Nations membership on 22 May 1992.


Slovenia was now safe, but the various wars in Yugoslavia rumbled on until 1995. In that same year the BBC broadcast a superb documentary series, entitled “The Death of Yugoslavia”.  It revealed that the YNA had invaded Slovenia on its own authority, but Milosevic ordered it to withdraw, because there were very few Serbs in that republic. Prior to that, Milosevic and the YNA had aimed to keep Yugoslavia together. From then on, Milosevic pursued a policy of a “Greater Serbia”.



Slobodan Milosevic in 1989.
« Last Edit: July 09, 2017, 12:10:07 AM by <k> »
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Re: Slovenia: post-Yugoslav coinage
« Reply #3 on: November 23, 2013, 10:17:51 PM »


Before Slovenia issued its own official coinage, a company called Lipa Holding produced a set of tokens or fantasies, dated 1990-2, which appealed to the Slovenes' patriotic feelings.
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Re: Slovenia: post-Yugoslav coinage
« Reply #4 on: November 23, 2013, 10:18:47 PM »
The tolar was the currency of Slovenia from 8 October 1991 until the introduction of the euro on 1 January 2007. Banknotes were issued first, then coins were introduced in 1992. The attractive reverse designs portrayed Slovenia's wildlife. The 10 stotinov depicted an olm, the only salamander design to be found on any circulation coin.



















10 stotinov.  Olm. A blind, cave-dwelling salamander.
20 stotinov.  Long-eared owl.
50 stotinov.  Honey bee.
1   tolar.        Brown trout.
2   tolar.        Barn swallow.
5   tolar.        Ibex.                   

Designers: Miljenko Licul and Zvone Kosovelj.

 
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Re: Slovenia: post-Yugoslav coinage
« Reply #5 on: November 23, 2013, 10:19:37 PM »


In the year 2000 Slovenia added a 10 tolar coin to the circulating coinage. The beautiful design depicted a stylised horse.

 
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Re: Slovenia: post-Yugoslav coinage
« Reply #6 on: November 23, 2013, 10:20:13 PM »


A 20 tolar circulation coin depicting an attractive design of a stork was released in 2003.

 
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Re: Slovenia: post-Yugoslav coinage
« Reply #7 on: November 23, 2013, 10:20:52 PM »


Also in 2003, a 50 tolar circulation coin was released. It portrayed an unusual design of a bull. This was the last of Slovenia's pre-euro circulation coins. Together they formed a stylish and much admired design series.
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Re: Slovenia: post-Yugoslav coinage
« Reply #8 on: November 23, 2013, 10:21:13 PM »




Below: the reverses of Slovenia's pre-euro coins.
« Last Edit: June 08, 2019, 05:18:50 PM by <k> »
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Re: Slovenia: post-Yugoslav coinage
« Reply #9 on: November 23, 2013, 10:22:07 PM »
Slovenia joined the European Union on 1 May 2004. It became a member of the eurozone in 2007, issuing its euro coins on the 1st January.







1   cent.  Stork (same design as the 20 tolarjev coin).
2   cent.  Prince's Stone (Fürstenstein, Knežji kamen).
5   cent.  Ivan Grohar's painting "Sower" (Sejalec).
10 cent.  Jože Plečnik's design for a parliament building.
20 cent.  Lipica Horses (Lipizzaner).
50 cent.  Triglav (Slovenia’s highest mountain).

€1.  Primož Trubar, author of the first printed book in Slovenian.
€2.  France Prešeren, poet. The "handwritten" text is from one of his poems, which later became the national anthem.









Design continuity: the "old" 20 tolarjev coin and the "new" 1 cent coin.

 
 
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Re: Slovenia: post-Yugoslav coinage
« Reply #10 on: November 23, 2013, 10:23:00 PM »


Coat of arms of Slovenia.



The Slovene coat of arms consists of a red bordered blue shield. Within the shield is a stylised white representation of Mount Triglav, Slovenia's highest peak. Under this there are two wavy lines, representing the Adriatic sea and the rivers of the country. Above Mount Triglav, there are three golden six-pointed stars, which are taken from the coat of arms of the Counts of Celje, the great Slovene dynastic house of the late 14th and early 15th centuries.

 

 
« Last Edit: September 04, 2020, 02:26:15 AM by <k> »
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Re: Slovenia: post-Yugoslav coinage
« Reply #11 on: November 23, 2013, 10:23:48 PM »


Flag of Slovenia.

The flag's colors come from the medieval coat of arms of the Duchy of Carniola, consisting of a blue eagle on a white background with a red-and-gold crescent.



Slovenia has a population of around 2,055,000. The indigenous ethnic Slovene minority in Italy is estimated at 83,000 to 100,000; in southern Austria, at around 25,000; in Croatia at 13,000, and in Hungary at 3,000.

 
 
« Last Edit: September 04, 2020, 02:27:36 AM by <k> »
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