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Offline <k>

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UK commemorative coins for 2014
« on: November 08, 2013, 11:49:38 PM »
Publication Date: Friday, 8 November 2013

Notice Code: 1101

BY THE QUEEN

A PROCLAMATION

DETERMINING THE SPECIFICATIONS AND DESIGN FOR TWO-POUND COINS COMMEMORATING THE CENTENARY OF THE FIRST WORLD WAR

ELIZABETH R.

Whereas under section 3(1)(a), (b), (cc), (cd), (d) and (dd) of the Coinage Act 1971 We have power, with the advice of Our Privy Council, by Proclamation to determine the denomination, the design and dimensions of coins to be made at Our Mint, to determine the weight and composition of coins other than gold coins or coins of silver of Our Maundy money and the remedy to be allowed in the making of such coins to provide for the manner of measurement of the variation from the standard weight of the coins and to determine the percentage of impurities which such coins may contain:

And Whereas under section 3(1)(f) and (ff) of the Coinage Act 1971 We have power, with the advice of Our Privy Council, by Proclamation to direct that coins made at Our Mint other than gold, silver, cupro-nickel and bronze coins shall be current and that any coin shall be legal tender for the payment of any amount:

And Whereas under section 6(2) of the Coinage Act 1971 We have power, with the advice of Our Privy Council, by Proclamation to prescribe the composition of the standard trial plates to be used for determining the justness of coins of any metal other than gold, silver or cupro-nickel:

And Whereas it appears to Us desirable to order that, to commemorate the centenary of the First World War, there should be made at Our Mint coins of the denomination of two pounds in gold, in silver, and in cupro-nickel and nickel-brass, having joined concentric inner and outer sections, being in gold with a different coloured gold outer section, in silver with a gold-plated outer section and in cupro-nickel and nickel-brass with a cupro-nickel inner section and a nickel-brass outer section:

We, therefore, in pursuance of the said section 3(1)(a), (b), (cc), (cd), (d), (dd), (f) and (ff), the said section 6(2), and of all other powers enabling Us in that behalf, do hereby, by and with the advice of Our Privy Council, proclaim, direct and ordain as follows:

GOLD COIN

1. (1) A new coin of gold of the denomination of two pounds shall be made, being a coin of a standard diameter of 28.4 millimetres, being circular in shape and having joined concentric inner and outer sections.

(2) Without prejudice to section 1(2) of the Coinage Act 1971, the inner and outer sections may consist of different alloys.

(3) The approximate diameter of the inner section shall be 20 millimetres.

(4) The variation from the standard weight will be measured by weighing each coin separately.

SILVER COIN

2. (1) A new coin of silver of the denomination of two pounds shall be made, being a coin of a standard weight (including the gold plate) of 12 grammes, a standard diameter of 28.4 millimetres, a standard composition (excluding the gold plate) of 925 parts per thousand fine silver, being circular in shape, and having joined concentric inner and outer sections, the outer section being plated with fine gold.

(2) In the making of the said silver coin a remedy (that is, a variation from the standard weight, composition or dimensions specified above) shall be allowed of an amount not exceeding the following, that is to say:

(a) a variation from the said standard weight of an amount per coin of 0.095 grammes for the inner and outer sections;

(b) in relation to those parts of the coin other than the gold plating, a variation from the said standard composition of five parts per thousand fine silver; and

(c) a variation from the said standard diameter of 0.125 millimetres per coin.

(3) The variation from the standard weight will be measured as the average of a sample of not more than one kilogram of the coin.

(4) The approximate diameter of the inner section shall be 20 millimetres.

(5) The said silver coin shall be legal tender for the payment of any amount in any part of Our United Kingdom.

SILVER PIEDFORT COIN

3. (1) A new coin of silver of the denomination of two pounds shall be made, being a coin of a standard weight (including the gold plate) of 24 grammes, a standard diameter of 28.4 millimetres, a standard composition (excluding the gold plate) of 925 parts per thousand fine silver, being circular in shape, and having joined concentric inner and outer sections, the outer section being plated with fine gold of a standard weight of plating of 0.085 grammes.

(2) In the making of the said silver coin a remedy (that is, a variation from the standard weight, composition or dimensions specified above) shall be allowed of an amount not exceeding the following, that is to say:

(a) a variation from the said standard weight of an amount per coin of 0.145 grammes for the inner and outer sections;

(b) in relation to those parts of the coin other than the gold plating, a variation from the said standard composition of five parts per thousand fine silver; and

(c) a variation from the said standard diameter of 0.125 millimetres per coin.

(3) The variation from the standard weight will be measured as the average of a sample of not more than one kilogram of the coin.

(4) The approximate diameter of the inner section shall be 20 millimetres.

(5) The said silver coin shall be legal tender for the payment of any amount in any part of Our United Kingdom.

CUPRO-NICKEL AND NICKEL-BRASS COIN

4. (1) A new coin of cupro-nickel and nickel-brass of the denomination of two pounds shall be made, being a coin of a standard weight of 12 grammes, a standard diameter of 28.4 millimetres, being circular in shape and having joined concentric inner and outer sections, with a standard composition as to the inner section of seventy-five per centum copper and twenty-five per centum nickel, and as to the outer section of seventy-six per centum copper, four per centum nickel and twenty per centum zinc.

(2) In the making of the said cupro-nickel and nickel-brass coin a remedy (that is, a variation from the standard weight, composition or dimensions specified above) shall be allowed of an amount not exceeding the following, that is to say:

(a) a variation from the said standard weight of an amount per coin of 0.1 grammes for the inner and outer sections;

(b) a variation from the said standard composition as to the inner section of two per centum copper and two per centum nickel, and as to the outer section of two per centum copper, three-quarters of one per centum nickel and two per centum zinc; and

(c) a variation from the said standard diameter of 0.125 millimetres per coin.

(3) The variation from the standard weight will be measured as the average of a sample of not more than one kilogram of the coin.

(4) The approximate diameter of the inner section shall be 20 millimetres.

(5) The inner and outer sections of the said coin may contain impurities of three-quarters of one per centum.

(6) The said cupro-nickel and nickel-brass coin shall be current and shall be legal tender for the payment of any amount in any part of Our United Kingdom.

(7) The composition of the standard trial plates to be used for determining the justness of the nickel-brass outer section of the said coin shall be pure copper, pure nickel and pure zinc.

DESIGN OF THE COINS

5. The design of the said coins shall be as follows:

‘For the obverse impression Our effigy with the inscription “ELIZABETH · II · D · G · REG · FID · DEF ” and the denomination “ · TWO POUNDS · ”, and for the reverse a depiction of Lord Kitchener pointing, with the inscription “YOUR COUNTRY NEEDS YOU” below the effigy of Lord Kitchener, and the inscription “THE FIRST WORLD WAR 1914 – 1918” and the date “2014” surrounding the design. The said coin will have graining on the edge and in incuse letters the inscription “THE LAMPS ARE GOING OUT ALL OVER EUROPE”, save for the gold coin where the incuse letters will be accompanied by a plain edge.

6. This Proclamation shall come into force on the seventh day of November Two-thousand and thirteen.

Given at Our Court at Buckingham Palace, this sixth day of November in the year of our Lord Two thousand and thirteen and in the sixty-second year of Our Reign.

GOD SAVE THE QUEEN

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Re: UK commemorative coins for 2014
« Reply #1 on: November 08, 2013, 11:50:16 PM »
Publication Date: Friday, 8 November 2013

Notice Code: 1101

BY THE QUEEN

A PROCLAMATION

DETERMINING THE SPECIFICATIONS AND DESIGN FOR TWO-POUND COINS COMMEMORATING THE FIVE HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE FOUNDING OF TRINITY HOUSE

ELIZABETH R.

Whereas under section 3(1)(a), (b), (cc), (cd), (d) and (dd) of the Coinage Act 1971 We have power, with the advice of Our Privy Council, by Proclamation to determine the denomination, the design and dimensions of coins to be made at Our Mint, to determine the weight and composition of coins other than gold coins or coins of silver of Our Maundy money and the remedy to be allowed in the making of such coins, to provide for the manner of measurement of the variation from the standard weight of the coins and to determine the percentage of impurities which such coins may contain:

And Whereas under section 3(1)(f) and (ff) of the Coinage Act 1971 We have power, with the advice of Our Privy Council, by Proclamation to direct that coins made at Our Mint other than gold, silver, cupro-nickel and bronze coins shall be current and that any coin shall be legal tender for the payment of any amount:

And Whereas under section 6(2) of the Coinage Act 1971 We have power, with the advice of Our Privy Council, by Proclamation to prescribe the composition of the standard trial plates to be used for determining the justness of coins of any metal other than gold, silver or cupro-nickel:

And Whereas it appears to Us desirable to order that, to commemorate the five hundredth anniversary of the founding of Trinity House, there should be made at Our Mint coins of the denomination of two pounds in gold, in silver, and in cupro-nickel and nickel-brass, having joined concentric inner and outer sections, being in gold with a different coloured gold outer section, in silver with a gold-plated outer section and in cupro-nickel and nickel-brass with a cupro-nickel inner section and a nickel-brass outer section:

We, therefore, in pursuance of the said section 3(1)(a), (b), (cc), (cd), (d), (dd), (f) and (ff), the said section 6(2), and of all other powers enabling Us in that behalf, do hereby, by and with the advice of Our Privy Council, proclaim, direct and ordain as follows:

GOLD COIN

1. (1) A new coin of gold of the denomination of two pounds shall be made, being a coin of a standard diameter of 28.4 millimetres, being circular in shape and having joined concentric inner and outer sections.

(2) Without prejudice to section 1(2) of the Coinage Act 1971, the inner and outer sections may consist of different alloys.

(3) The approximate diameter of the inner section shall be 20 millimetres.

(4) The variation from the standard weight will be measured by weighing each coin separately.

SILVER COIN

2. (1) A new coin of silver of the denomination of two pounds shall be made, being a coin of a standard weight (including the gold plate) of 12 grammes, a standard diameter of 28.4 millimetres, a standard composition (excluding the gold plate) of 925 parts per thousand fine silver, being circular in shape, and having joined concentric inner and outer sections, the outer section being plated with fine gold.

(2) In the making of the said silver coin a remedy (that is, a variation from the standard weight, composition or dimensions specified above) shall be allowed of an amount not exceeding the following, that is to say:

(a) a variation from the said standard weight of an amount per coin of 0.095 grammes for the inner and outer sections;

(b) in relation to those parts of the coin other than the gold plating, a variation from the said standard composition of five parts per thousand fine silver; and

(c) a variation from the said standard diameter of 0.125 millimetres per coin.

(3) The variation from the standard weight will be measured as the average of a sample of not more than one kilogram of the coin.

(4) The approximate diameter of the inner section shall be 20 millimetres.

(5) The said silver coin shall be legal tender for the payment of any amount in any part of Our United Kingdom.

SILVER PIEDFORT COIN

3. (1) A new coin of silver of the denomination of two pounds shall be made, being a coin of a standard weight (including the gold plate) of 24 grammes, a standard diameter of 28.4 millimetres, a standard composition (excluding the gold plate) of 925 parts per thousand fine silver, being circular in shape, and having joined concentric inner and outer sections, the outer section being plated with fine gold of a standard weight of plating of 0.085 grammes.

(2) In the making of the said silver coin a remedy (that is, a variation from the standard weight, composition or dimensions specified above) shall be allowed of an amount not exceeding the following, that is to say:

(a) a variation from the said standard weight of an amount per coin of 0.145 grammes for the inner and outer sections;

(b) in relation to those parts of the coin other than the gold plating, a variation from the said standard composition of five parts per thousand fine silver; and

(c) a variation from the said standard diameter of 0.125 millimetres per coin.

(3) The variation from the standard weight will be measured as the average of a sample of not more than one kilogram of the coin.

(4) The approximate diameter of the inner section shall be 20 millimetres.

(5) The said silver coin shall be legal tender for the payment of any amount in any part of Our United Kingdom.

CUPRO-NICKEL AND NICKEL-BRASS COIN

4. (1) A new coin of cupro-nickel and nickel-brass of the denomination of two pounds shall be made, being a coin of a standard weight of 12 grammes, a standard diameter of 28.4 millimetres, being circular in shape and having joined concentric inner and outer sections, with a standard composition as to the inner section of seventy-five per centum copper and twenty-five per centum nickel, and as to the outer section of seventy-six per centum copper, four per centum nickel and twenty per centum zinc.

(2) In the making of the said cupro-nickel and nickel-brass coin a remedy (that is, a variation from the standard weight, composition or dimensions specified above) shall be allowed of an amount not exceeding the following, that is to say:

(a) a variation from the said standard weight of an amount per coin of 0.1 grammes for the inner and outer sections;

(b) a variation from the said standard composition as to the inner section of two per centum copper and two per centum nickel, and as to the outer section of two per centum copper, three-quarters of one per centum nickel and two per centum zinc; and

(c) a variation from the said standard diameter of 0.125 millimetres per coin.

(3) The variation from the standard weight will be measured as the average of a sample of not more than one kilogram of the coin.

(4) The approximate diameter of the inner section shall be 20 millimetres.

(5) The inner and outer sections of the said coin may contain impurities of three-quarters of one per centum.

(6) The said cupro-nickel and nickel-brass coin shall be current and shall be legal tender for the payment of any amount in any part of Our United Kingdom.

(7) The composition of the standard trial plates to be used for determining the justness of the nickel-brass outer section of the said coin shall be pure copper, pure nickel and pure zinc.

DESIGN OF THE COINS

5. The design of the said coins shall be as follows:

‘For the obverse impression Our effigy with the inscription “ELIZABETH · II · DEI · GRA · REG · FID · DEF ·”, and for the reverse a depiction of a lighthouse lens, surrounded by the inscription “TRINITY HOUSE” and the dates “1514” and “2014”, with the denomination “TWO POUNDS”. The said coin will have graining on the edge and in incuse letters the inscription “SERVING THE MARINER”, save for the gold coin where the incuse letters will be accompanied by a plain edge.

6. This Proclamation shall come into force on the seventh day of November Two-thousand and thirteen.

Given at Our Court at Buckingham Palace, this sixth day of November in the year of our Lord Two thousand and thirteen and in the sixty-second year of Our Reign.

GOD SAVE THE QUEEN

Offline <k>

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Re: UK commemorative coins for 2014
« Reply #2 on: November 08, 2013, 11:50:47 PM »
Publication Date: Friday, 8 November 2013

Notice Code: 1101

BY THE QUEEN

A PROCLAMATION

DETERMINING THE SPECIFICATIONS AND DESIGN FOR FIFTY PENCE COINS CELEBRATING THE TWO THOUSAND AND FOURTEEN COMMONWEALTH GAMES

ELIZABETH R.

Whereas under section 3(1)(a), (b), (c), (cc), (cd), (d) and (dd) of the Coinage Act 1971 We have power, with the advice of Our Privy Council, by Proclamation to determine the denomination, the design and dimensions of coins to be made at Our Mint, to determine the weight and fineness of certain gold coins, the remedy to be allowed in the making of such coins and their least current weight, to determine the weight and composition of coins other than gold coins or coins of silver of Our Maundy money and the remedy to be allowed in the making of such coins, to provide for the manner of measurement of the variation from the standard weight of coins and to determine the percentage of impurities which such coins may contain:

And Whereas under section 3(1)(ff) of the Coinage Act 1971 We have power, with the advice of Our Privy Council, by Proclamation to direct that any coin shall be legal tender for the payment of any amount:

And Whereas it appears to Us desirable to order that, to celebrate the two thousand and fourteen Commonwealth Games there should be made at Our Mint coins of the denomination of fifty pence in gold, in silver and in cupro-nickel:

We, therefore, in pursuance of the said section 3(1)(a), (b), (c), (cc), (cd), (d), (dd) and (ff), and of all other powers enabling Us in that behalf, do hereby, by and with the advice of Our Privy Council, proclaim, direct and ordain as follows:

GOLD COIN

1. (1) A new coin of gold of the denomination of fifty pence shall be made, being a coin of a standard weight of 15.5 grammes, a standard diameter of 27.3 millimetres, a millesimal fineness of 916.66, and being in the shape of an equilateral curve heptagon.

(2) In the making of the said gold coin a remedy (that is, a variation from the standard weight, diameter or fineness specified above) shall be allowed of an amount not exceeding the following, that is to say:

(a) a variation from the said standard weight of an amount per coin of 0.065 grammes;

(b) a variation from the said standard diameter of 0.125 millimetres per coin; and

(c) a variation from the said millesimal fineness of two per mille.

(3) The least current weight of the said gold coin shall be 15.4 grammes.

(4) The variation from the standard weight will be measured as the average of a sample of not more than one kilogram of the coin.

SILVER COIN

2. (1) A new coin of silver of the denomination of fifty pence shall be made, being a coin of a standard weight of 8 grammes, a standard diameter of 27.3 millimetres, a standard composition of 925 parts per thousand fine silver, and being in the shape of an equilateral curve heptagon.

(2) In the making of the said silver coin a remedy (that is, a variation from the standard weight, diameter or composition specified above) shall be allowed of an amount not exceeding the following, that is to say:

(a) a variation from the said standard weight of an amount per coin of 0.075 grammes;

(b) a variation from the said standard diameter of 0.125 millimetres per coin; and

(c) a variation from the said standard composition of five parts per thousand fine silver.

(3) The variation from the standard weight will be measured as the average of a sample of not more than one kilogram of the coin.

(4) The said silver coin shall be legal tender for the payment of any amount in any part of Our United Kingdom.

SILVER PIEDFORT COIN

3. (1) A new coin of silver of the denomination of fifty pence shall be made, being a coin of a standard weight of 16 grammes, a standard diameter of 27.3 millimetres, a standard composition of 925 parts per thousand fine silver, and being in the shape of an equilateral curve heptagon.

(2) In the making of the said silver coin a remedy (that is, a variation from the standard weight, diameter or composition specified above) shall be allowed of an amount not exceeding the following, that is to say:

(a) a variation from the said standard weight of an amount per coin of 0.095 grammes;

(b) a variation from the said standard diameter of 0.125 millimetres per coin; and

(c) a variation from the said standard composition of five parts per thousand fine silver.

(3) The variation from the standard weight will be measured as the average of a sample of not more than one kilogram of the coin.

(4) The said silver coin shall be legal tender for the payment of any amount in any part of Our United Kingdom.

CUPRO-NICKEL COIN

4. (1) A new coin of cupro-nickel of the denomination of fifty pence shall be made, being a coin of a standard weight of 8 grammes, a standard diameter of 27.3 millimetres, a standard composition of seventy-five per centum copper and twenty-five per centum nickel, and being in the shape of an equilateral curve heptagon.

(2) In the making of the said cupro-nickel coin a remedy (that is, a variation from the standard weight, diameter or composition specified above) shall be allowed of an amount not exceeding the following, that is to say:

(a) a variation from the said standard weight of an amount per coin of 0.045 grammes;

(b) a variation from the said standard diameter of 0.125 millimetres per coin; and

(c) a variation from the said standard composition of two per centum copper and two per centum nickel.

(3) The said cupro-nickel coin may contain impurities of three-quarters of one per centum.

(4) The variation from the standard weight will be measured as the average of a sample of not more than one kilogram of the coin.

(5) The said cupro-nickel coin shall be legal tender for the payment of any amount in any part of Our United Kingdom.

DESIGN OF THE COINS

5. The design of the said coins shall be as follows:

‘For the obverse impression Our effigy with the inscription “ELIZABETH · II D · G · REG · F · D FIFTY PENCE ”, and for the reverse a design of a cyclist and a sprinter, with the Scottish Saltire bisecting the coin and the inscription “XX COMMONWEALTH GAMES GLASGOW ” and the date “2014”. The coins shall have a plain edge’.

6. This Proclamation shall come into force on the seventh day of November Two thousand and thirteen.

Given at Our Court at Buckingham Palace, this sixth day of November in the year of our Lord Two thousand and thirteen and in the sixty-second year of Our Reign.

GOD SAVE THE QUEEN

Offline <k>

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Re: UK commemorative coins for 2014
« Reply #3 on: November 08, 2013, 11:51:16 PM »
Publication Date: Friday, 8 November 2013

Notice Code: 1101

BY THE QUEEN

A PROCLAMATION

DETERMINING THE SPECIFICATIONS AND DESIGN FOR FIVE-POUND COINS COMMEMORATING THE THREE HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE DEATH OF QUEEN ANNE

ELIZABETH R.

Whereas under section 3(1)(a), (b), (cc), (cd), (d) and (dd) of the Coinage Act 1971 We have power, with the advice of Our Privy Council, by Proclamation to determine the denomination, the design and dimensions of coins to be made at Our Mint, to determine the weight and composition of coins other than gold coins or coins of silver of Our Maundy money and the remedy to be allowed in making such coins and to determine the percentage of impurities which such coins may contain:

And Whereas under section 3(1)(f) and (ff) of the Coinage Act 1971 We have power, with the advice of Our Privy Council, by Proclamation to direct that coins made at Our Mint other than gold, silver, cupro-nickel and bronze coins shall be current and that any coin shall be legal tender for the payment of any amount:

And Whereas it appears to Us desirable to order that, to commemorate the three hundredth anniversary of the death of Queen Anne, there should be made at Our Mint coins of the denomination of five pounds in gold, in silver and in cupro-nickel:

We, therefore, in pursuance of the said section 3(1)(a), (b), (cc), (cd), (d), (dd), (f) and (ff), and of all other powers enabling Us in that behalf, do hereby, by and with the advice of Our Privy Council, proclaim, direct and ordain as follows:

GOLD COIN

1. (1) A new coin of gold of the denomination of five pounds shall be made, being a coin of a standard diameter of 38.608 millimetres, and being circular in shape.

(2) The variation from the standard weight will be measured as the average of a sample of not more than one kilogram of coins.

GOLD-PLATED SILVER COIN

2. (1) A new coin of gold-plated silver of the denomination of five pounds shall be made, being a coin of a standard weight (including the gold plate) of 28.276 grammes, a standard diameter of 38.608 millimetres, a standard composition (excluding the gold plate) of 925 parts per thousand fine silver, being circular in shape, and being plated with fine gold.

(2) In the making of the said gold-plated silver coin a remedy (that is, a variation from the standard weight, composition or dimensions specified above) shall be allowed of an amount not exceeding the following, that is to say:

(a) a variation from the said standard weight of an amount per coin of 0.20 grammes;

(b) in relation to those parts of the coin other than the gold plating, a variation from the said standard composition of five parts per thousand fine silver; and

(c) a variation from the said standard diameter of 0.125 millimetres per coin.

(3) The said gold-plated silver coin shall be current and shall be legal tender for the payment of any amount in any part of Our United Kingdom.

SILVER COIN

3. (1) A new coin of silver of the denomination of five pounds shall be made, being a coin of a standard weight of 28.276 grammes, a standard diameter of 38.608 millimetres, a standard composition of 925 parts per thousand fine silver, and being circular in shape.

(2) In the making of the said silver coin a remedy (that is, a variation from the standard weight, composition or dimensions specified above) shall be allowed of an amount not exceeding the following, that is to say:

(a) a variation from the said standard weight of an amount per coin of 0.13 grammes;

(b) a variation from the said standard composition of five parts per thousand fine silver; and

(c) a variation from the said standard diameter of 0.125 millimetres per coin.

(3) The said silver coin shall be legal tender for the payment of any amount in any part of Our United Kingdom.

SILVER PIEDFORT COIN

4. (1) A new coin of silver of the denomination of five pounds shall be made, being a coin of a standard weight of 56.552 grammes, a standard diameter of 38.608 millimetres, a standard composition of 925 parts per thousand fine silver, and being circular in shape.

(2) In the making of the said silver coin a remedy (that is, a variation from the standard weight, composition or dimensions specified above) shall be allowed of an amount not exceeding the following, that is to say:

(a) a variation from the said standard weight of an amount per coin of 0.215 grammes;

(b) a variation from the said standard composition of five parts per thousand fine silver; and

(c) a variation from the said standard diameter of 0.125 millimetres per coin.

(3) The said silver coin shall be legal tender for the payment of any amount in any part of Our United Kingdom.

CUPRO-NICKEL COIN

5. (1) A new coin of cupro-nickel of the denomination of five pounds shall be made, being a coin of a standard weight of 28.276 grammes, a standard diameter of 38.608 millimetres, a standard composition of seventy-five per centum copper and twenty-five per centum nickel, and being circular in shape.

(2) In the making of the said cupro-nickel coin a remedy (that is, a variation from the standard weight, composition or dimensions specified above) shall be allowed of an amount not exceeding the following, that is to say:

(a) a variation from the said standard weight of an amount per coin of 0.13 grammes;

(b) a variation from the said standard composition of two per centum copper and two per centum nickel; and

(c) a variation from the said standard diameter of 0.125 millimetres per coin.

(3) The said cupro-nickel coin may contain impurities of three-quarters of one per centum.

(4) The said cupro-nickel coin shall be legal tender for the payment of any amount in any part of Our United Kingdom.

DESIGN OF THE COINS

6. The design of the said coins shall be as follows:

‘For the obverse impression Our effigy with the inscription “ELIZABETH · II · D · G · REG · F · D · FIVE POUNDS · 2014”, and for the reverse the effigy of Queen Anne enclosed by baroque decoration including the Royal Arms from the reign of Queen Anne and surrounded by the inscription “QUEEN ANNE DEI GRATIA 1665-1714”. The coins will have a graining upon the edge’.

7. This Proclamation shall come into force on the seventh day of November Two thousand and thirteen.

Given at Our Court at Buckingham Palace, this sixth day of November in the year of our Lord Two thousand and thirteen and in the sixty-second year of Our Reign.

GOD SAVE THE QUEEN

Offline <k>

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Re: UK commemorative coins for 2014
« Reply #4 on: November 09, 2013, 12:59:38 AM »


The design of the said coins shall be as follows:

‘For the obverse impression Our effigy with the inscription “ELIZABETH · II · D · G · REG · FID · DEF ” and the denomination “ · TWO POUNDS · ”, and for the reverse a depiction of Lord Kitchener pointing, with the inscription “YOUR COUNTRY NEEDS YOU” below the effigy of Lord Kitchener, and the inscription “THE FIRST WORLD WAR 1914 – 1918” and the date “2014” surrounding the design. The said coin will have graining on the edge and in incuse letters the inscription “THE LAMPS ARE GOING OUT ALL OVER EUROPE”, save for the gold coin where the incuse letters will be accompanied by a plain edge.


Not in the best taste, perhaps, but a historical view of the war.

Offline andyg

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always willing to trade modern UK coins for modern coins from elsewhere....

Offline augsburger

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Re: UK commemorative coins for 2014
« Reply #6 on: November 19, 2013, 02:36:44 AM »
Initial thoughts are, the WW1 one I don't like but don't hate either. The trinity house one is simple, I don't know anything about Trinity House but the design isn't amazing. I like the 50p for the Common Wealth Games, the only thing is that the 2014 looked like 2914 when I saw it and many people might believe they have a great error because of it.

Offline Prosit

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Re: UK commemorative coins for 2014
« Reply #7 on: November 19, 2013, 03:05:13 AM »
I don't think any of them are terrible. Can't say any of them are inspiring either.

Dale

Offline <k>

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Re: UK commemorative coins for 2014
« Reply #8 on: November 19, 2013, 11:42:43 AM »
I agree with most of these sentiments.

The Commonwealth Games design, the first coin design by Alex Loudon, is by far the strongest, IMO, even though I don't even like sports, and would stand out in any year.

The Trinity House design is worthy but symmetrical, and symmetricality rarely makes for a good design. A different perspective could have improved it considerably. It reminds me of something that might appear in the recent lighthouse coin series by Denmark.

The Queen Anne design fits the bill in conjuring up her times, but the contemporaneous style does not appeal to the modern eye. Interestingly, this was designed by Mark Richards, who recently designed the UK's royal wedding coin (William and Kate), as well as the 2011 coin commemorating the 90th birthday of the Duke of Edinburgh.
 
The WW1 coin is tasteless, as already pointed out. It reminds me of a UK TV comedy chat show of the early 1990s. "Is there anybody here who fought in BOTH world wars?" About 5 old men in the studio audience raised their hands. "Wonderful!" said the hostess, before asking: "Which one did you like the best?"  ::)
 

Offline kena

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Re: UK commemorative coins for 2014
« Reply #9 on: November 19, 2013, 04:01:56 PM »
What is tasteless about the WWI £2 coin?

It is the only coin of the lot that I can say that it is British since it is an iconic symbol from WWI.

With regards to the £1 coins, which is which since when I got the pics, I forget was written earlier?  One is supposed to be for Scotland and the other for Northern Ireland.   Oh year, the one is the shamrock is for Northern Ireland...

Ken

Offline <k>

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Re: UK commemorative coins for 2014
« Reply #10 on: November 19, 2013, 05:31:34 PM »
What is tasteless about the WWI £2 coin?

Well, a jingoistic aristocrat with a silly moustache, saying, "Come on, chaps - let's all get killed!"

Does anybody really know what the War was about now, apart from a few kings and emperors having a family quarrel? I always remember A J P Taylor's analysis that nobody really wanted it, but it started by accident because it was the first fully mechanised war, and the trains all ran so smoothly...

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK commemorative coins for 2014
« Reply #11 on: November 20, 2013, 01:08:29 AM »
"I hope you stay up there to let me enjoy this war in peace. Because I do enjoy this war. I've never enjoyed anything as much in all my life... And you! You always spoil it."

- Warden Hodges to captain Mainwaring, who is stuck up the town hall clock tower with his platoon in the episode "Time on my hands".
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline augsburger

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Re: UK commemorative coins for 2014
« Reply #12 on: November 20, 2013, 02:04:36 AM »
Quote
Well, a jingoistic aristocrat with a silly moustache, saying, "Come on, chaps - let's all get killed!"

It happened. It's a reminder to anyone that going into war thinking it will be fun is just wrong. So in a way it is a good symbol of everything that is wrong with war, and it gets people remembering, commemorating without celebrating, those who died needlessly without actually telling people about death.

Offline Prosit

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Re: UK commemorative coins for 2014
« Reply #13 on: November 20, 2013, 02:11:22 AM »
The short answer is the death of poor Franz and Sophie.

The slightly longer answer is 40 years of belligerence by the major powers toward each other along with
the militarism, the interlocking alliances, the imperialism, and the nationalism.

Neither answer is adaquate.

We do reap what we sow.

Dale





Does anybody really know what the War was about now, apart from a few kings and emperors having a family quarrel?

Offline Bimat

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UK commemorative coins for 2014
« Reply #14 on: January 07, 2014, 05:28:53 AM »
Christian charity criticises new £2 coin for glorifying war + petition

Posted: Monday, January 6, 2014 6:33 pm

The Fellowship of Reconciliation - one of Britain's oldest Christian Peacemaking groups - is calling upon the public to make 'Coins into Ploughshares' by turning the new £2 coins depicting Lord Kitchener's famous call to arms from 1914 into an investment in a just and peaceful future.

FoR Director, Millius Palayiwa said: "We are very concerned that the launch of the new £2 coin design is in danger of glorifying war and drawing public attention away from the horrors of the trenches and the continuing need for peace, healing and reconciliation in the world."

"In the spirit of our founders, we are calling upon Christians, and everyone who wants to see the establishment of a world order based on love, forgiveness, compassion and reconciliation to save the new coins when they come across them and donate them to one of the many organisations working to build a just and peaceful world for everyone."

Chair Richard Bickle added: "The Fellowship of Reconciliation began, literally, on the eve of the First World War with a group of Christians from across Europe meeting to explore alternatives to armed conflict, and to assert their belief in Jesus' call to build a world order based on love.  In this our centenary year, that need is as pressing as ever, and we want to challenge the many WWI centenary commemorations which appear to glorify the 'Great War'.

"Our International Peacemakers Fund is a practical way that people can invest in building a just and peaceful future by supporting grassroots peace and reconciliation projects in some of the most divided and violent communities in Africa, Asia, the Middle East, Latin America and Oceania."

[...]

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It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.