Muhammad bin Tughluq: Takhtgah Dehli mint, date AH731. Ref.: G/G D403.

Started by mtayal, November 16, 2008, 06:14:45 PM

Previous topic - Next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

mtayal

Hi,

Please help identify coin in the attached pic. I have about 10 coins like this.

Regards,
Mahesh

Rangnath

We've had discussions of Forced currency before.  I can not seem to access them in our search engine.  Perhaps it is temporarily disabled?
In any case, this coin seems to be Tanka minted between 730 AH and 732 AH. They are usually common, weigh about 9.2 grams, but I'll leave it to someone else to provide the mint. 
richie

Oesho


QuoteWe've had discussions of Forced currency before.  I can not seem to access them in our search engine.  Perhaps it is temporarily disabled?

Have a look at : http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,1437.msg11042/topicseen.html#msg11042

Oesho

Muhammad bin Tughluq, forced token currency, brass tanka, mint: Takhtgah Dehli, date AH731. Ref.: G/G D403.

Rangnath

Thank you Oesho.
As someone in the audience of the great Houdini once said, "I know it's a trick, but how does he do it?"
richie

shariqkhan

Very nice of a controversial ruler. Now a days these coins are available at INR 150 (in very good condition)

Rangnath

For more information on forced currency and Muhammad bin Tughluq..

Well Shariq, for this American stranded in America, coins such as these, even if  in bad condition,  are never available for INR 150.  Sigh.  :(

richie

mtayal

Richie,

Just out of curiosity what will be the price of this coin in US?

Regards
Mahesh

Rangnath

The problem, Mahesh, is one of supply and demand. Generally speaking, there is no supply nor demand in the US for coins of the Sultanates.  American numismatists are overwhelmingly focused on American coins. At a large coin show in Portland, Oregon, there were about 200 vendors.  Fewer than ten had "world coins".  One had Roman and Greek coins.  One had Russian coins.  One had a good collection of British Raj coins for sale.  The others had an assortment of everything.  I bought one bull and horse coin from circa 1000 AD.  I managed to find one "Princely State" coin to purchase.  An Iranian dealer did have some Iranian coins, both old and new.  But I did not see one Sultanate coin.
There are dealers who have such inventory, of course.  And you can find them as easily as I, on the web.  Here is an example:  http://www.vcoins.com/ancient/coinindia/store/listCategoriesAndProducts.asp?idCategory=55
richie

Figleaf

Your problem was spelling, Richie. In the other thread the spelling was Tughlaq.

The problem with Americans collecting American coins (or Dutchmen collecting Dutch coins etc.) is that these collections all look the same. Everybody has all the common issues and is looking for the uncommon ones at a price they can afford. Collecting is a matter of how much money you can plunk down and boils down to making an inventory list and a want list, as the coins are widely researched and coins and catalogues are widely available.

For those who prefer a bit more adventure, there are escapes. Coins in non-latin scripts are an obvious escape, but so are coins struck before 1600 and tokens. They are generally less well available, not as well catalogued, not as well researched, they are cheap and come in endless varieties. Some people think that this is bad. I think it's a challenge and an unparalleled adventure (there's so little adventure left on earth). In that sense, I am happy to see that dealers ignore these areas.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Rangnath

My problem has always been spelling Peter.  I have looked far and wide for scapegoats: the Celts, the Vikings, the Normans.  Recently I read about the Dutch contribution to English Orthography; no wonder I have difikultees!
Of course, I probably can't use that one for the mis-spelling of Tughluq. 
Richie