Unadopted crown designs for the Queen's Silver Jubilee 1977-78

Started by <k>, July 08, 2013, 07:11:20 PM

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<k>

UK 25 pence 1977.jpg

The coin as issued.


Queen Elizabeth II celebrated her Silver Jubilee in 1977.

This was the 25th anniversary of her accession to the throne (becoming Queen).


Arnold Machin had portrayed the Queen the first series of decimal coins (1968 to 1984).

He was chosen to design this commemorative 25 pence coin.


Though the coin was legal tender, it was not really intended for circulation.

However, each school child in the UK received one, free of charge.

Many of them spent theirs!
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Silver Jubilee Crown.jpgSilver Jubilee Crown-.jpg


Here are Arnold Machin's original sketches. Originally the reverse was going to be rather different.

His originals are slightly less ornate than the issued designs, so for that reason I prefer them.

Overall, however they are still too "busy" and ornate for my tastes.

It is interesting to see the original sketches, nevertheless.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

In 1978 Queen Elizabeth II celebrated the 25th anniversary of her coronation. The Royal Mint asked artist Barry Stanton to develop designs for Ascension, St. Helena and Tristan da Cunha. Ultimately, the Pobjoy Mint won the tender, and the designs were never minted.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Stanton-Ascension-1.jpg


Stanton-Ascension-2.jpg

The designs for Ascension Island.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Stanton-St.Helena-1.jpg


Stanton-St.Helena-2.jpg


Stanton-St.Helena-3.jpg

The designs for St. Helena.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Stanton-Tristan da Cunha-1.jpg


Stanton-Tristan da Cunha-2.jpg

The designs for Tristan da Cunha.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Tristan da Cunha asked the Royal Mint to mint a commemorative coin for the island, that would celebrate the Queen's Silver Jubilee of 1977.

English artist and sculptor Christopher Ironside was assigned to the project. The results can be seen below, though the scans are not of high quality.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

TDC-1.jpg

First design.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

TDC-2.jpg


Next design - a rather different concept.

Tristan da Cunha did not like the cloud.

Maybe there are never any clouds over that island?  :)
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



Tristan da Cunha, 25 pence, 1977.  Queen Elizabeth II's Royal Yacht Britannia. 

The issued design - without the cloud!
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Falkland 77.jpg


Falkland Islands, 50 pence, 1977. 

Silver Jubilee commemorative coin.  Design without wreath.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Falkland 77-alt.jpg

Falkland Islands, 50 pence, 1977. 

Silver Jubilee commemorative coin.  Design with wreath.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Falkland Islands 50 pence 1977-.jpg

Issued design.  I prefer the wreathless version.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Figleaf

Re. Tristan da Cunha.  The merlion would have been too Singaporean. I would have gone for the (simple) lobster design. I like the animal. Especially for dinner.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

<k>

Gibraltar sketch 1.jpg


Gibraltar sketch 2.jpg


Gibraltar sketch 3.jpg


The Royal Mint was asked to produce a coin for Gibraltar.

It was in celebration of the Queen's silver jubilee of 1977.


Christopher Ironside produced a series of sketches for Gibraltar.

Above you see the first threes sketches.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.