Author Topic: Umayyad: Yazid II bin 'Abd al-Malik Dirham, Wasit Mint, AH105 (Album-135)  (Read 1324 times)

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Offline Quant.Geek

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Umayyad: Yazid II bin 'Abd al-Malik Dirham, Wasit Mint, AH105 (Album-135)

Special thanks to http://islamiccoins.ancients.info for translation and general information...

Obverse Field:
لا اله الا الله وحده لا شرك له

There is no deity except (the one) God alone. He has no equal

Obverse Margin:
بسم الله ضرب هذا الدرهم بواسط سنة خمس و مئة
In the name of God. This Dirham was struck in Wasit in the year five and one hundred

Reverse Field:
الله احد الله الصمد لم يلد و لم يولد و لم يكن له كفوا احد
God is One God. The eternal and indivisible, who has not begotten, and has not been begotten and never is there His equal

Reverse Margin:
محمد رسول الله ارسله بالهدى و دين الحق ليظهره على الدين كله ولو كره المشركون

Muhammad is the messenger of God. He sent him with guidance and the true religion to reveal it to all religions even if the polytheists abhor it.

« Last Edit: February 16, 2014, 09:37:36 PM by THCoins »
A gallery of my coins can been seen at FORVM Ancient Coins

Offline Figleaf

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That is a very serious coin. If the script hadn't betrayed it, it could have been struck centuries later. In my innocence, I would have thought that it looked too good to be true. No wonder, medieval European rulers accepted them as good money and even tried to circulate imitations of Arabic coins.

An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Quant.Geek

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This series of coins represents the natural transition from the Sasanian-type coins of the Arab-Sasanians to a more native coinage.  After several decades of Sasanian-type coinage, 'Abd al-Malik Bin Marwan issued these epigraphical dirhams.  Based on the historical accounts of the historian Ibn al-Athir, the Roman emperor of the time apparently threatened to issue dinars with offensive legends of the Prophet when 'Abd al-Malik Bin Marwan's paper shipments contained Arabic stamps on them.  In response, 'Abd al-Malik Bin Marwan started issuing these types of coins.  The coinage was pretty much standard afterwards and each Caliph kept the wording and standard the same, other than the date and mint of course.

A gallery of my coins can been seen at FORVM Ancient Coins