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Lebanon: trees, galleys and lions

Started by <k>, June 10, 2013, 01:38:32 PM

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<k>

Lebanon50P1929.jpg

Lebanon is a country that is often overlooked by collectors, but it has produced some beautiful designs.

Look at this silver 50 piastres coin from 1929.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#1


Lebanon, 5 piastres,1925.

The cedar tree is Lebanon's national symbol, which also appears on its flag.

It has been depicted in several different versions on the nation's coins.

And look at the bees on this beauty. They just don't make them like that any more.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#2
Lebanon, 5 piastres, 1955.jpg

Lebanon, 5 piastres, 1955.  Another version of the cedar tree.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#3
Lebanon 10P 1955-.jpg

From the same year, a rather different cedar on the 5 piastres.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#4
Lebanon 1 livre 1975.JPG

Lebanon, 1 livre, 1975.  Your final cedar of the topic.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#5


Lebanon, 2½ piastres, 1940.  Look at these quaint lion heads.

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



Lebanon, 5 piastres, 1955.  Another superb lion head.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#7
Lebanon 5 piastres 1925.jpg

Lebanon, 5 piastres, 1925.


Lebanon also depicted a few ancient galleys on its coins over the years.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#8


Lebanon, 5 piastres, 1952.


Lebanon 10 piastres 1955.jpg

Lebanon, 10 piastres, 1955.  Another attractive galley design.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#9
Lebanon 10 piastres-1955.jpg


Lebanon, 10 piastres, 1955. 

For some reason Lebanon issued two different versions of the denomination in 1955.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#10


The same galley, this time in copper-nickel, rather than aluminium-bronze.  Lebanon, 10 piastres, 1961.

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#11


Lebanon, 2006, 50 pounds.   Not a galley this time, but a lateen rigged sloop.

This coin was a one year type only, as inflation made it defunct.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#12


Going back in time, some nice caligraphy appears on this 5 piastres coin of 1924.

I like the shape of the inner rim, but it is curious that the denomination is given as 5 Syrian piastres.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Figleaf

Quote from: <k> on June 10, 2013, 01:56:28 PM
it is curious that the denomination is given as 5 Syrian piastres.

Imperial politicking. Wikipedia explains it well:

After the fall of the Ottoman Empire, the currency became the Egyptian pound in 1918. Upon gaining control of Syria and Lebanon, the French replaced the Egyptian pound with a new currency for Syria and Lebanon, the Syrian pound, which was linked to the French franc at a value of 1 pound = 20 francs. Lebanon issued its own coins from 1924 and banknotes from 1925. In 1939, the Lebanese currency was officially separated from that of Syria, though it was still linked to the French franc and remained interchangeable with Syrian money.

As you can see from the mint marks, many of the elements you show are an original French design.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

<k>

Thanks for the link to the currency matter, Peter.

Yes, you can definitely see French elements of style in the designs, too: "stylish" is the word.  8)
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.