Extinct animals (not dinosaurs)

Started by <k>, May 02, 2013, 10:32:55 PM

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<k>

This topic is about extinct animals, except for dinosaurs, which have their own thread:

Dinosaurs on coins
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<k>

#1






Falkland Islands, circulation 50 pence coin.  Designer: Robert Elderton


From Wikipedia:

The Falkland Islands wolf (Dusicyon australis), also known as the warrah and occasionally as the Falkland Islands dog, Falkland Islands fox or Antarctic wolf, was the only native land mammal of the Falkland Islands. It became extinct in 1876. An analysis of its DNA in 2009 identified the Falkland Island wolf's closest living relative as the maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus)—an unusually long-legged, fox-like South American canid, from which it separated about 6.7 million years ago.


You can see the maned wolf on a Brazilian coin here.
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<k>

#2


Mauritius, 10 rupees, 1971.  Dodo.  Designer: Christopher Ironside


From Wikipedia:

The Dodo (Raphus cucullatus) is an extinct flightless bird that was endemic to the island of Mauritius, east of Madagascar in the Indian Ocean. Its closest genetic relative was the also extinct Rodrigues Solitaire, the two forming the subfamily Raphinae of the family of pigeons and doves.

The first recorded mention of the Dodo was by Dutch sailors in 1598. In the following years, the bird was preyed upon by hungry sailors, their domesticated animals, and invasive species introduced during that time. The last widely accepted sighting of a Dodo was in 1662. Its extinction was not immediately noticed, and some considered it to be a mythical creature. In the 19th century, research was conducted on a small quantity of remains of four specimens that had been brought to Europe in the early 17th century. Since then, a large amount of subfossil material has been collected from Mauritius, mostly from the Mare aux Songes swamp. The extinction of the Dodo within only about a century of its discovery called attention to the previously unrecognised problem of human involvement in the disappearance of entire species. The Dodo achieved widespread recognition from its role in the story of Alice in Wonderland, and it has since become a fixture in popular culture, often as a symbol of extinction and obsolescence. It is frequently used as a mascot on Mauritius.
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<k>

#3
Mauritius 200R 2007.JPG

Mauritius, 200 rupees, 2007.  Dodo.
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<k>

#4
Mauritius 1000 rupees 1988-.jpg

Mauritius 1000 rupees 1988.jpg

Mauritius 1000 rupees 1988~.jpg

Mauritius, 1000 rupees, 1988.  Dodo, designer: Christopher Ironside.
 
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<k>

#5
Tasmanian tiger.jpg

From Wikipedia:

The thylacine was the largest known carnivorous marsupial of modern times. It is commonly known as the Tasmanian tiger (because of its striped back) or the Tasmanian wolf. Native to continental Australia, Tasmania and New Guinea, it is thought to have become extinct in the 20th century. It was the last extant member of its family, Thylacinidae. As a marsupial, it was not closely related to the tiger or wolf (those placental mammals that provided two of its common names), but because of convergent evolution it displayed the same general form and adaptations. In the 1980s it was declared extinct, not having been seen alive in the wild since the 1930s.



Australia, 20 cents, 2001.jpg

Australia, 20 cents, 2001.  Tasmanian Tiger.
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<k>

#6
New Zealand $1 2009-.jpg

New Zealand, 1 dollar (silver), 2009.  Giant moa.


From Wikipedia:

The moa were nine species (in six genera) of flightless birds endemic to New Zealand. The two largest species, Dinornis robustus and Dinornis novaezelandiae, reached about 3.6 m (12 ft) in height with neck outstretched, and weighed about 230 kg (510 lb).

Moa belong to the ratite group in the order Dinornithiformes. The nine species of moa were the only wingless birds, lacking even the vestigial wings which all other ratites have. They were the dominant herbivores in New Zealand's forest, shrubland and subalpine ecosystems for thousands of years. Until the arrival of the Māori, they were hunted only by the Haast's Eagle. It is generally considered that most, if not all, species of moa died out due to overhunting by the Māori, by 1400 AD, and because of habitat decline before European colonisation and settlement.

Research published in 2010 has found that the moa's closest cousins are small terrestrial South American birds called the tinamous, which are able to fly. Previously, the kiwi, the Australian emu, and cassowary were thought to be the closest ancestors.
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SquareEarth

#7


South China Tiger and Yantze Dauphin.
Tong Bao_Tsuho_Tong Bo_Thong Bao

WillieBoyd2

California Golden Bear, the last one seen in 1922, a subspecies of the Grizzly Bear:


United States Commemorative Half Dollar 1925-S California Diamond Jubilee

:)
https://www.brianrxm.com
The Mysterious Egyptian Magic Coin
Coins in Movies
Coins on Television

<k>

#9
Transnistria 5R 2007.jpg

Transnistria, 5 rubles, 2007.  Mammoth.

We do need a mammoth design to round out the subject, I feel. This is the best I could find. Admittedly, they are never going to be found on a circulation coin. More and more mammoth corpses are being found in Siberia, as global warming advances. Scientists talk and dream of using their DNA to produce clones, but this is surely destined to remain a fantasy. In any case, the unfortunate creatures would only be doomed to life in a zoo or in captivity.
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Miner

#10
Isle of Man 1 crown 1994 Mammoth.jpg

Isle of Man, 1 crown, 1994.   Mammoth.

<k>

#11
Gibraltar, 1 crown, 1994.jpg

Gibraltar, 1 crown, 1994.  Sabre-toothed tiger.


From Wikipedia:

The Machairodontinae are an extinct subfamily of carnivorous mammals of the family Felidae (true cats). They were endemic to Asia, Africa, North America, South America, and Europe from the Miocene to Pleistocene living from about 23 million until about 11,000 years ago.

The Machairodontinae contain many of the extinct predators commonly known as "saber-toothed cats", including the famed genus Smilodon, as well as other cats with only minor increases in the size and length of their maxillary canines. Sometimes, other carnivorous mammals with elongated teeth are also called saber-toothed cats, although they do not belong to the felids.

The name 'saber-toothed tigers' is misleading. Machairodonts were not even in the same subfamily as tigers, there is no evidence that they had tiger-like coat patterns, and this broad group of animals certainly did not all live or hunt in the same manner as the modern tiger. DNA analysis published in 2005 confirmed that the Machairodontinae diverged early from the ancestors of modern cats and are not closely related to any living feline species. Sabertooths also coexisted in many places together with conical-toothed cats.


Note: British spelling: 'sabre';  US spelling: 'saber'.
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<k>

#12


New Zealand, 1 penny, 1955.  Huia bird.


From Wikipedia:

The huia (Heteralocha acutirostris) is an extinct species of New Zealand wattlebird, endemic to the North Island of New Zealand. The last confirmed sighting of a huia was in 1907, although there were credible sightings as late as the early 1960s.

Its extinction had two primary causes. The first was rampant overhunting to procure huia skins for mounted specimens and their tail feathers for hat decorations. The second major cause was the widespread deforestation of the lowlands of the North Island by European settlers to create pasture for agriculture. Most of these forests were ancient, ecologically complex primary forests, and huia were unable to survive in regenerating secondary forests.

It was already a rare bird before the arrival of Europeans, confined to the Ruahine, Tararua, Rimutaka and Kaimanawa mountain ranges in the south-east of the North Island. It was remarkable for having the most pronounced sexual dimorphism in bill shape of any bird species in the world. The female's beak was long, thin and arched downward, while the male's was short and stout, like that of a crow. Males were 45 cm (18 in) long, while females were larger at 48 cm (19 in). The sexes were otherwise similar, with orange wattles and deep metallic, bluish-black plumage with a greenish iridescence on the upper surface, especially about the head. The tail feathers were unique among endemic birds in having a broad white band across the tips.

The birds lived in forests at both montane and lowland elevations – they are thought to have moved seasonally, living at higher elevation in summer and descending to lower elevation in winter. Huia were omnivorous and ate adult insects, grubs and spiders, as well as the fruits of a small number of native plants. Males and females used their beaks to feed in different ways: the male used his bill to chisel away at rotting wood, while the female's longer, more flexible bill was able to probe deeper areas. Even though the huia is frequently mentioned in biology and ornithology textbooks because of this striking dimorphism, not much is known about its biology; it was little studied before it was driven to extinction.

The huia is one of New Zealand's best-known extinct birds because of its bill shape, its sheer beauty and special place in Māori culture and oral tradition. The bird was regarded by Māori as tapu (sacred), and the wearing of its skin or feathers was reserved for people of high status.
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<k>

#13
Czech Republic 200K-2018.jpg


Czech Republic, 200 korun, 2018.  200th Anniversary of the Establishment of the National Museum.

At bottom left you see the thylacine (Tasmanian 'wolf').  Does anybody recognise the far older species?
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

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andyg

always willing to trade modern UK coins for modern coins from elsewhere....