UK 2 pound coin: 150th anniversary of the London Underground

Started by <k>, April 21, 2013, 12:03:01 PM

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<k>

Barber Osgerby.jpg


The issued coin and these sketches were designed by Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby.

They are known as the design team BarberOsgerby.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

BarberOsgerby2.jpg

A single Tube train is shown here.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

BarberOsgerby3.jpg

Now the angle of view changes.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

BarberOsgerby4.jpg

We are close to the finished design now.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

BarberOsgerby5.jpg


And here is the finished design. The designers chose to depict the 1967 Victoria line train due to its aesthetic simplicity and easily recognisable outline.

According to the design team:

The coin depicts the familiar image of a Tube train emerging from a tunnel; the outer ring of the coin is used graphically to suggest the tunnel walls. The coin's edge bears an inscription representing an Underground line with a number of stations.

The rails traverse the coin's outer ring, contradicting conventions of a concentric frame. A ground line references the exergue on classical coins and here the view changes from two-dimensional to perspective, creating a sense of movement. The coin features the iconic London Underground New Johnston font.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

BarberOsgerby-7.jpg

The patterned edge was inspired by the dotted lines on the Tube map.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

andyg

These in circulation since January, distributed via the ticket machines at tube stations.

always willing to trade modern UK coins for modern coins from elsewhere....

Figleaf

So where did you find those sketches?

I think the final design is strong, but I would also have liked the design shown in BarberOsgerby2.jpg. I like visual tricks.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Prosit

I thought the design less than it could have been but the actual coin looks good.
Dale

<k>

Quote from: Figleaf on April 21, 2013, 11:00:58 PM
So where did you find those sketches?

Peter

On a design blog that linked to the design team's own site.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

malj1

Best use of the bimetallic design that I have seen as the silver-like inner part lends itself to the effect of a darkened tunnel against the outer brighter entrance.

I must look out for one.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

chrisild

I also like the final design (that ultimately was minted) best, because of that frontal view. The three trains would have been OK had they represented different periods - one from the early years, a "middle aged" train and a recent one. But don't do three almost identical ones.

Christian

Bimat

Quote from: malj1 on April 22, 2013, 12:12:25 AM
Best use of the bimetallic design that I have seen as the silver-like inner part lends itself to the effect of a darkened tunnel against the outer brighter entrance.

I must look out for one.

I have both the 'Underground' coins and they indeed look very cool! 8)

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

malj1

I know stamps are not our thing but this was on my mail this morning and just begging to be included here.

It does lend a bit of colour!
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Figleaf

An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.