Author Topic: Knowlman Bros. LTD  (Read 1869 times)

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Offline malj1

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Knowlman Bros. LTD
« on: January 24, 2013, 10:43:34 PM »
Knowlman Bros, Ltd. Drapery and Furnishing Stores corner of 681 to 689 Holloway Road, and 13 to 19 Junction Road, Upper Holloway. Bone tokens were presumably issued around the time of  WW1. The company went into liquidation in 1928. An advert can be seen here with illustration showing the Holloway Road frontage.

All bone and approx. 33mm except the smaller third type penny at 30mm. Blank reverses to all.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2013, 10:54:16 PM by malj1 »
Malcolm
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Offline malj1

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Re: Knowlman Bros. LTD
« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2014, 12:47:22 PM »
A few months back I add another three pieces to this collection, 1½d, 2d [33mm] and 4d 27.9mm. These are also bone.

I have now added a postcard showing a view of their premises in Holloway Rd. This shows that previous image in the link given above uses a fair bit of artistic licence when compared with the photograph! The reverse of the postcard shows an advert and was posted Nov. 02 1904
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Offline bgriff99

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Re: Knowlman Bros. LTD
« Reply #2 on: October 18, 2014, 11:36:17 PM »
I've seen references to bone tokens but never seen one.   Is that its actual material?    Making them from bakelite or that artificial ivory of a collodion composition would seem to have been more easily done.   The artificial ivory was developed for billiard balls in the 1880's, but too often exploded or caught fire.   The majority of turn of the century pianos I have seen have that for its keys, including mine.  It holds up remarkably well for 100+ years.   Just don't touch a flame to it.

Offline malj1

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Re: Knowlman Bros. LTD
« Reply #3 on: October 18, 2014, 11:53:25 PM »
Yes bone is the material probably using cattle bone, maybe from the rib bones. They could be polished using a tumbler and then printed.

They all appear to be from early 20th century though to the First world war period. I have a few from WW1 munition factories and even a transport piece can be seen here this one includes advertising on the reverse.

Sometimes these break as they have a grain running in one direction, rather like a piece of wood.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Offline bgriff99

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Re: Knowlman Bros. LTD
« Reply #4 on: October 19, 2014, 01:05:03 AM »
Thanks for the link to the other token, which is clearly bone.   On yours it looks like it was either used for an ashtray, or maybe even an intended incendiary device, with a cigarette having burned all the way across it.

Offline malj1

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Re: Knowlman Bros. LTD
« Reply #5 on: October 19, 2014, 02:09:32 AM »
I think the stain is more likely to be rust from having been kept in an old tin that got damp or even wet, with the rust stain transferring to the token, this is a quite commonly seen occurrence with coins kept in such a place as in an old shed for instance.

For some munition factory bone tokens see my page here, one piece in particular, look for Fison Industries 3d, has been broken in two and cellotaped together.
Malcolm
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Offline FosseWay

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Re: Knowlman Bros. LTD
« Reply #6 on: October 20, 2014, 08:20:30 PM »
The materials used to make tokens are many, varied and sometimes scarcely believable. Bone is one of the more normal!

There are Swedish tokens, mostly from the 17th and 18th century, made of leather and näver, or treated birch bark. Unfortunately I don't have any otherwise I'd post them!