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€2 Type A& Type B of the edge inscription

Started by blackev, August 29, 2008, 10:33:47 AM

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blackev

I have been sending private messages regarding the Type A and Type B of the €2 coins.
I realize that others may be interested.

This Image explains the differences between Type A and Type B


blackev

I still have one more problem with this regarding the Belgium, Spain, France, Ireland and Luxembourg edge inscriptions.

it is described on this site: http://euro.home.sapo.pt/types.htm that the two types for the countries mentioned above is:

Type A:


&

Type B:


With countries such as Finland & Greece the two types are understandable.
The Type B is a 180degree rotation of the Type A.

Type A:


Type B:


Looking at the Belgium, Spain, France, Ireland and Luxembourg edge inscription the type B is Not a 180degree rotation of type A

instead the stars are rotated but the number is not.
Notice Type A: 2(up), star(up), 2(down), star(down)
Now
Notice Type B: 2(up), star(down), 2(down), star(up)

How can this be explained?

-blackev

a3v1

Quote from: blackev on August 29, 2008, 10:51:03 AM
I still have one more problem with this regarding the Belgium, Spain, France, Ireland and Luxembourg edge inscriptions.

it is described on this site: http://euro.home.sapo.pt/types.htm that the two types for the countries mentioned above is:

Type A:


&

Type B:


With countries such as Finland & Greece the two types are understandable.
The Type B is a 180degree rotation of the Type A.

Type A:


Type B:


Looking at the Belgium, Spain, France, Ireland and Luxembourg edge inscription the type B is Not a 180degree rotation of type A

instead the stars are rotated but the number is not.
Notice Type A: 2(up), star(up), 2(down), star(down)
Now
Notice Type B: 2(up), star(down), 2(down), star(up)

How can this be explained?

-blackev
@ Kevin,
The explanation is simple: The two images aren't taken from the same point of view. This has only been done so that the rotation of the stars is clearly seen.
In type B the "up" two has become a "down" two and vice versa. So it is a perfect 180% rotation, only to be seen by comparing the rotation of the stars.
Take two coins and compare for yourself.
Regards,
a3v1
Over half a century of experience as a coin collector.
-------------
Money is like body fat: If there's too much of it, it always is in the wrong places.

blackev

Thank you a3v1,

Hopefully this Image will help explain for anyone looking at this post:

Note the national side on all the coins is upward:



The answer rests with the rotation,
rotating Type A clockwise you get:
2(up), star(up), star(up),
[2 S S]

rotating Type B clockwise you get:
star(up), star(up), 2(up)
[S S 2]


-blackev

BC Numismatics

Kevin,
  In Belgium,they'd say that a Position A coin is one that has the edge inscription upright along with the reverse (the common reverse design),& that a Position B coin is one that has the edge inscription upside down,but the reverse is the right way up facing you.

I know that this is the case with the old Belgian Franc-denominated coins. You could always check it out on http://www.muntslag.eu ,which is Geert's website.

Aidan.

a3v1

Quote from: BC Numismatics on August 30, 2008, 01:40:20 PM
In Belgium,they'd say that a Position A coin is one that has the edge inscription upright along with the reverse (the common reverse design),& that a Position B coin is one that has the edge inscription upside down,but the reverse is the right way up facing you.
I know that this is the case with the old Belgian Franc-denominated coins. You could always check it out on http://www.muntslag.eu ,which is Geert's website.
@ Aidan,
You are right, as far as the old Belgian Franc-denominated coins are concerned. In some cases positions A and B even have different prices.
But this doesn't go for the Eurocoins as the edge inscriptions are fit before the coins are actually minted. In many cases even at the blank manufacturer's plant. So A and B always are evenly divided: 50/50%.
As the rest of the world maintains that the A-side of a coin should be the side showing the authority of the issue; the Belgians, when it comes to Eurocoins, now are sticking with the majority.
Regards,
a3v1
Over half a century of experience as a coin collector.
-------------
Money is like body fat: If there's too much of it, it always is in the wrong places.

tonyclayton

For mass-produced coins such as those discussed the edge inscription may be added either before or after striking (I believe it is usually before).  Either way, the probability of the edge being upright or inverted is almost exactly 50%, thus there is no real difference between the two types.

However, some edge inscribed coins are struck in a multi-part collar which has to come apart to release the coin, slowing the production process, so this is generally used for proof and pattern coins.  In this case the edge inscrition will always be a particular way up.

blackev

QuoteHowever, some edge inscribed coins are struck in a multi-part collar which has to come apart to release the coin, slowing the production process, so this is generally used for proof and pattern coins.  In this case the edge inscrition will always be a particular way up.

Thanks tonyclayton that is very interesting I was wondering if proof coins have "types", now I know.

-blackev

BC Numismatics

Kevin,
  The 2 Euro coins from both Cyprus & Greece also exist as both Type A & B edge varieties,as does the Irish silver 10 Shillings.

Aidan.