Author Topic: Latent images on coins  (Read 16075 times)

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Offline <k>

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Latent images on coins
« on: January 19, 2013, 09:24:38 PM »
Latent images are used in order to make a coin harder to forge. If you tilt the coin to a certain position in the light, you will see the latent image.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Latent images on coins
« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2013, 09:25:04 PM »
Russia, 10 roubles, 2012.



« Last Edit: July 04, 2017, 08:09:12 PM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Latent images on coins
« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2013, 09:25:57 PM »
Jersey, 2 pounds, 1998.
« Last Edit: July 04, 2017, 08:11:25 PM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Latent images on coins
« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2013, 09:28:16 PM »
Guernsey, 8 doubles.  Heraldic lions.

Guernsey, 2 pounds, 1997.  Do you see the heraldic lions that form Guernsey's state emblem?
« Last Edit: July 04, 2017, 08:10:36 PM by <k> »
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Offline Bimat

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Latent images on coins
« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2013, 07:27:55 AM »
Many Luxembourg €2 commemorative coins show latent image. Here's one for example..



Aditya
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Offline Bimat

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Latent images on coins
« Reply #5 on: January 20, 2013, 07:29:10 AM »
..And the 2009 EMU commemorative:



Aditya
« Last Edit: May 15, 2016, 11:30:03 AM by Niels »
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline adam

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Re: Latent images on coins
« Reply #6 on: January 20, 2013, 07:32:25 AM »
Poland 2zł - 2000 Millenium


Poland 2zł - 2010 Grunwald, Kłuszyn
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Thai bimetallic coins and nickel alloy 10, 20, 50 & 100 baht coins
Last update: Dec 2015 updated only nickel coin info.
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Offline adam

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Re: Latent images on coins
« Reply #7 on: January 20, 2013, 07:39:44 AM »
Luxembourg €2 cc TYE 2012

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Thai bimetallic coins and nickel alloy 10, 20, 50 & 100 baht coins
Last update: Dec 2015 updated only nickel coin info.
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Offline adam

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Re: Latent images on coins
« Reply #8 on: January 20, 2013, 07:49:38 AM »
Netherlands €5 - 2011 100 jaar Muntgebouw also gold €10 with the same design.
1. 2011 and its negative image.
2. 6 images of U, K, N, M, D, R viewing from 6 directions.
3. QR code.

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Thai bimetallic coins and nickel alloy 10, 20, 50 & 100 baht coins
Last update: Dec 2015 updated only nickel coin info.
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translateltd

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Re: Latent images on coins
« Reply #9 on: January 20, 2013, 09:52:27 AM »
Guernsey, 2 pounds, 1997.  Do you see the heraldic lions that form Guernsey's state emblem?


I previously thought Japan's "new" 500 yen was the first to break into this field, but clearly not.


Offline chrisild

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Re: Latent images on coins
« Reply #10 on: January 20, 2013, 10:58:04 AM »
As far as I remember, the Spanish Mint (FNMT-RCM) was the first one to use latent images on circulation coins. Was about 20 years ago; will have to check a catalog ... más tarde. :)

Christian

Offline Bimat

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Latent images on coins
« Reply #11 on: January 20, 2013, 01:07:33 PM »
Japanese 500 Yen coins from 'Prefectures' series show latent image on obverse. Attached a small scan, however latent image is not visible. The central square displays '60' when the coin is hold at an angle. :) (60 stands for 60th Anniversary of Enforcement of the Local Autonomy Law)

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Latent images on coins
« Reply #12 on: January 20, 2013, 01:28:11 PM »
As far as I remember, the Spanish Mint (FNMT-RCM) was the first one to use latent images on circulation coins. Was about 20 years ago

Ah no - it was precisely 20 years ago. :)  In 1987 Spain issued a new 500 pesetas coin; it shows King Juan Carlos and Queen Sofía (depicting both made sense also because '87 was the year of their 25th wedding anniversary). In 1993 a modified version was issued, with a latent image on the reverse. The coins were used as regular circulation coins until the introduction of the euro cash. The first attached image shows both sides of the coin - a large image of a '93 piece is here for example. The latent image shows either the last two digits of the year of issue (in the second attached image that is a "96"), or the crowned "M" mintmark of the Madrid mint.

Christian

Offline Bimat

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Latent images on coins
« Reply #13 on: January 20, 2013, 02:29:34 PM »
Spain €20 (2010), shows latent image of FNMT's mint mark / 10 depending on angle in which it is held.



Aditya
« Last Edit: May 15, 2016, 11:29:20 AM by Niels »
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Offline chrisild

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Re: Latent images on coins
« Reply #14 on: January 20, 2013, 02:51:20 PM »
Yeah, those latent images are hard to photograph, so a design study will actually show the details better. :)  Strictly speaking, what we have seen in this topic are different technologies. When the first latent images were used, they would show two views. The Dutch "geboortemunt" (2004) had three different angles; the Dutch Mint called that MultiView Minting. And the Luxembourgish coin in reply #4 uses what the KNM calls Minted Photo Image ...

Christian