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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #75 on: August 27, 2010, 01:31:37 PM »
Coins bring great change
AL Ahram weekly, no. 1013 (26 august to 1 september 2010)

Nevine El-Aref visits the newly-opened temporary exhibition at the Egyptian Museum

The Egyptian Museum in Cairo is holding a temporary exhibition on "Coins Through the Ages". Over the past eight years the museum has hosted a series of temporary exhibitions, the most recent of which focussed on five artefacts that had been repatriated to Egypt. The temporary exhibition gallery in Room 44 has also hosted a series of exhibitions on excavations under the direction of foreign missions, including teams from America, France, Poland and the Netherlands.

"Coins Through the Ages" includes a vast collection of gold, silver and bronze coins dating back to historical eras from the late Pharaonic right through the Mameluke period. Also featured in the exhibition are a gold belt of Ptolemy III Euergetes and a number of gold bullion pieces from the fourth century AD. These objects were previously placed on display in the coin and papyri section of the museum.

To highlight the distinguished collection, says Sayed Hassan, co-director of the Egyptian Museum, the museum will use the exhibition to show how Egypt's political, economical and religious history can be traced through its coinage.

Wafaa El-Seddik, the director of the Egyptian Museum, says the exhibition is the first of its kind and will include early coins bearing hieroglyphic symbols.

Mohamed Abdel-Fattah, the head of the museum department at the Supreme Council of Antiquities (SCA), says that before the invention of a monetary system people bartered their surplus crops and cattle amongst themselves to obtain the necessary commodities. The invention of coins provided the means of transition from a barter system to a monetary system. Metal coins are divisible, variable in form, convenient for trade with foreign markets and can be saved for use at a later time.

The first people to invent a coinage-system were the Lydians of Asia Minor in the second half of the seventh century BC. The rich Greek merchants trading in the city-states on the western coast of Asia Minor adopted the Lydians' weight-system and began to issue oval ingots stamped with seals to guarantee weight and purity. After about 600 BC the use of coinage spread rapidly to Greece, and there, owing to improved techniques, coins developed into a splendid quality. Croesus, King of Lydia (560-546 BC) was the first ruler to strike coins in gold and silver.

During the Pharaonic period, gold, silver and bronze rings and large bronze ingots were sometimes used in the barter system. When the Persians first came to Egypt in 525 BC they brought their coins with them. The Egyptians treated these coins as ingots, valuing them based on their weight in metal and sometimes melting the coins for other uses. In the 30th Dynasty the Egyptians revolted against the Persians, and Nectanebo and his son, Tachos, struck Athenian coins to pay the Greek soldiers who helped them fight the Persians. The coins were also used in transactions with Asian merchants. These famous coins were called nwb-nfr, based on the two hieroglyphic signs on the obverse (or front surface), meaning "fine gold". These rare coins, which have a picture of a horse on the reverse (or back surface), are now representative of the transition from barter to coinage in Egypt. The nwb-nfr coins were still likely to have been used in the barter system as well as in a monetary fashion with foreigners, since the ancient Egyptians had not yet adopted a monetary trade system.

When Alexander the Great came to Egypt in 332 BC he considered himself a successor to the Pharaohs. During his reign, the typical coin bore depictions of deities or religious symbols. Alexander's image appeared on coins after his death in 323 BC. In this image he was portrayed as a deity or a hero on the obverse, while Zeus was represented on the reverse.

In approximately 306 BC the Greek governor became an independent ruler, and shortly thereafter the first coinage of an independent Egypt was created. When Ptolemy I Soter proclaimed himself to be the king of Egypt, he struck his own coins in gold, silver and bronze. On the obverse was the head of Ptolemy I and on the reverse was an eagle on a thunderbolt, both symbols of Zeus. Around the edge of this scene appeared the king's name in Greek characters.

During the Roman era beginning with the reign of Augustus Egypt had special coins known as Alexandrian coins. These coins were named after the city in which they were minted and were restricted to use within Egypt. These Roman coins also had Greek inscriptions. The obverse showed a depiction of the emperor's head; the revers, beginning in the third century AD, bore representations of various Egyptian, Greek and Roman deities. After the Arab conquest of Egypt in 641 AD the name of the minting location on the coins was changed to the Arabic script.

Source: Al Ahram

Photo caption: gold Graeco-Roman coins on show, photo: Khaled El-Fiqi
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #76 on: August 27, 2010, 04:26:13 PM »
Old Money Shows At Princeton


Detail From: Czechoslovakia, 50 korun, 1929. (Front.)
Designed by Alfons Mucha, engraved by Karel Wolf.
Collection of Vsevolod Onyshkevych.

(All Images Courtesy Of Princeton University Numismatic Collection.)

It makes the world go around, it talks, it can't buy happiness, and the only sure way to double it is to fold it over once and put it in your pocket. Yes, we're talking a mark, a yen, a buck, or a pound, but minus that clinking, clanking sound. In other words, currency. While vintage coin collections are a dime a dozen, it is more unusual, and more difficult, to accumulate historical paper money. Almost as quickly as they disappear from the average checking account, banknotes become victims of the wear and tear of circulation. The average life span of a one dollar bill is 22 months according to the Federal Reserve Bank. By contrast, the average coin stays in circulation for 25 years. But the design and creation of printed bills dates all the way back to 7th century China, and a new exhibition of archival currency at Princeton University's Firestone Library proves making money really can be a fine art.


Robert Deodaat Emile Oxenaar,
Dutch 100 Guilder Note, 1977. (Front)
Collection of Vsevolod Onyshkevych.


Detail From Obverse.


Robert Deodaat Emile Oxenaar,
Dutch 100 Guilder Note, 1977. (Back)
This Beautiful Note Has Since Been Replaced By The Euro.

The exhibit, Money on Paper, features American currency from Princeton's Numismatic Collection, one of only three such comprehensive collections at a U.S. university. (The others are at Yale University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.) Princeton's currency collection includes over 650 U.S. Colonial/Continental notes, roughly 2,000 Confederate States of America bills, and nearly 1,200 19th century American "Broken Bank Notes," so named because of the frequency with which the issuing banks closed up shop, leaving the bill holder with a fistful of worthless paper. Supplementing the display are rare items on loan from the world class banknote collection of Princeton Class of 1983 alum, Vsevolod Onyshkevych, which is particularly strong in European currency.


New Jersey, 1 shilling, December 31, 1763.
Designed By Benjamin Franklin.
Printed by James Parker, Woodbridge. (Front)


New Jersey, 1 shilling, December 31, 1763. (Back)

Beginning in 1684, British colonies were barred from minting their own coins. This led to the American colonies becoming one of the earliest regular issuers of paper money. Both Paul Revere and South Carolina engraver Thomas Corum were notable designers of colonial currency, but the most inventive note printer of the era was, not surprisingly, Benjamin Franklin, who even penned a 1729 treatise on the subject. Beginning in 1730, Franklin was the printer of all paper money issued by Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware. Franklin's license to print money proved extremely lucrative, and he devised several ingenious ways to prevent counterfeiting. These included a secret process for transferring the irregular patterns and fine lines of tree leaves onto printing plates, and the creation of a unique paper stock infused with mica particles.


John James Audubon,
Grouse Vignette, c. 1822.

The star attraction of the Princeton exhibit is the first public display of what has been called the "holy grail of Audubon scholarship," the recently discovered banknote engraving of a grouse by the great wildlife illustrator, which is his first published work. Audubon had made two references to the illustration in his diaries, but some researchers doubted its existence. It was even suggested that Audubon lied when he wrote of it to enhance his, then nonexistent, reputation. Eric Newman, a numismatic historian, and Robert Peck, a senior fellow with Philadelphia's Academy of Natural Sciences spent ten years searching for the long-lost illustration. They discovered it on a sheet of sample images produced in 1824 by a New Jersey engraver who specialized in illustrations for banknotes. Although it is unsigned, the image is "Vintage, quintessential Audubon," according to Roberta Olson, curator of drawings at the New York Historical Society, which houses all 435 original watercolors for Birds of America. On display with a sample sheet containing the vignette will be an original watercolor by Audubon, a steel printing plate from Birds of America, and the Princeton first edition of the elephant folio book open to the page with Audubon's drawing of the pinnated grouse.


Who Knew George Had Such Great Gams?


New York, New York, The National Bank, $5, Unissued Proof (c. 1829).
Vignettes of George Washington and the Mythological Figure Hebe
by Asher B. Durand.


Imagine The Uproar If Today's Treasury Department
Issued A Five Featuring This Scantily-Clad Beauty?

One of the premier banknote designers of the first half of the 19th century was renowned Hudson River School painter, Asher B. Durand. Durand began his career as an engraver. He produced the well-known engraving of the signing of the Declaration of Independence for portraitist John Trumbull, which in 1995 became the obverse design on the two-dollar bill. Durand, along with his brother, Cyrus, pioneered the classical, patriotic designs which still hold sway over American currency today. Their intricate borders and highly detailed designs were also a delightfully decorative way of discouraging would-be forgers.


John C. Calhoun,
7th Vice President Of The United States.


Confederate States of America, $1,000,
Montgomery, Alabama, May 22, 1861.


Andrew Jackson,
7th President Of The United States.

Another section of the exhibit compares the imagery of Northern and Southern currency before and during the American Civil War. Included is a complete set of six notes printed by the National Bank Note Company of New York and smuggled into the Confederacy in 1861 for distribution as currency of Alabama and Virginia. These notes are in Extremely Fine condition, making them exceedingly rare.


Obverse of the Series of 1896 Silver Certificate:
"Electricity as the Dominant Force in the World."


And The Image That Got It Banned In Boston.[/size
]

The American section of the exhibition ends with the Educational Series of 1896, a group of Silver Certificates featuring allegorical motifs, and considered to be the most beautiful currency ever produced in the United States. Designed and engraved by some of the most important illustrators of the day, the series featured the infamous five-dollar bill "banned in Boston" due to its depiction of bare-breasted women on the obverse.


Czechoslovakia, 50 korun, 1929. (Front.)
Designed by Alfons Mucha, engraved by Karel Wolf.
Collection of Vsevolod Onyshkevych.

The European section of the show includes Czechoslovakian currency produced by Alfons Mucha, better known for his Art Nouveau posters of actress Sarah Bernhardt, among others. When Czechoslovakia won its independence after World War I, Mucha designed the first postage stamps, banknotes and other government documents for the new state. By the late 1930's Mucha's art, and his Czech nationalism,were denounced in the Nazi press. When German troops invaded Czechoslovakia in the spring of 1939, the 79 year-old artist was considered so dangerous he was among the first persons detained by the Gestapo. During his imprisonment and interrogation, Mucha contracted pneumonia. Though eventually released, his health was ruined, and he never recovered. Broken-hearted at the takeover of his homeland by Hitler, Mucha died on July 14, 1939.


Czechoslovakia, 50 korun, 1929. (Back)
Designed by Alfons Mucha, engraved by Karel Wolf.
Collection of Vsevolod Onyshkevych.


Something For The Ladies:
Money Featuring A Beefcake Shot.

A publication entitled Money on Paper, by Princeton's Curator of Numismatics Alan M. Stahl, accompanies the exhibit. It contains a full catalogue of the bank notes on display, with many illustrated in full color. There are also three illustrated essays in the catalogue: Mark Tomasko writing on "Bank Note Engraving in the United States," Francis Musella on "Benjamin Franklin's Nature Printing on Bank Notes," and an edited version of the headline-making article by Robert Peck and Eric P. Newman entitled "Discovered! The First Engraving of an Audubon Bird." The Money on Paper exhibit at the Leonard L. Milberg Gallery for the Graphic Arts of the Firestone Library opens August 30, 2010 and continues through January 2, 2011.

Source: SeattlePi
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #77 on: August 30, 2010, 01:26:18 PM »
Rarest Coins Ever in Daraa National Museum
Sana, 29/08/2010

Horan area in southern Syria knew currency thousands of years ago instead of the exchange system that prevailed in contemporary civilizations, securing a place on the economic map and an effective role in trade exchange.

The big number of the unearthed coins in Horan reflects the flourishing economic and trade environment as well as the political and administrative image that prevailed during the Classical Age in the region.

Ayham al-Zoubi, Secretary of Daraa National Museum said: “The museum has a coin with the image of Emperor Philip the Arab (Marcus Julius Philippus) who ruled in Rome (244-249 A.D.), which is, as historians say, one of the rarest coins in the world.”

He added the museum has 7,500 coins, 6,000 of which were unearthed in Sanamain city in 2007.

Al-Zoubi indicated that the latest finds unearthed at Tel al-Sheikh Saad site in Horan in 2009 unearthed 74 copper coins dating back to the Greek era, which prove that Horan used coins in trade dealings ever since. The coins also highlight the political, economic and military role of Horan cities, and some of them bear a celebratory character portraying emperors, victories, buildings and gods at that time.

Also, excavations unearthed gold coins dating back to various Islamic eras, the most famous of which is the golden Dinar of al-Motassembillah, minted in 224 Hijri in Sanaa, Yemen.

“Trade is the mainstay of the Syrian economy, given Syria's geographical position and economic production”, says the German researcher Horst Klengel.

Source: Day Press
« Last Edit: October 23, 2010, 12:37:29 AM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #78 on: September 02, 2010, 02:33:40 AM »
It’s all about the money
By VERDEL BISHOP Monday, August 30 2010

PEOPLE OFTEN drop coins on the ground and don’t bother to pick them up because they think it isn’t worth the time or effort. When most of us go into a store, we leave the one cent change with the cashier because we don’t see its value.

Some people store their coins away for years and years without considering its worth; but consider this — it costs this government 17 cents to make one cent. This should be enough to cause you to be mindful of the value of your cents. And if you are still not convinced, a visit at the Central Bank Money Museum in Port-of-Spain, would surely make you realise that every cent counts.

Objects like knives and spades and various shapes and sizes of coins and banknotes have all served as money in different times and places. These items, as well as a wealth of historical information can be obtained at the Central Bank Money Museum.

Visitors to the museum hear fascinating stories about money, from barter to modern times, learn about money’s history and see examples of rare coins and currency.

According to Central Bank Senior Manager, Nicole Crooks, as money continues to evolve, so does the museum, which was launched six years ago, to mark the Central Bank’s 40th anniversary.

“The museum provides an alternative learning experience for students and adults. It tells a story through a mix of showcases, graphics, multi media and interactive elements. We are always upgrading the museum to keep it fresh and informative,” Crooks said.

“Our aim is to make the museum more interactive and we are putting things in place to facilitate this. We have a lot of tourists and students who visit the museum. We have had over 18,000 visitors.”

There are interactive games which allow visitors to learn the fundamentals of investing. There are touch screen computer monitors which allow visitors to test their knowledge of this country’s financial history. The Central Bank is currently upgrading the museum with additional features and artifacts.

One interesting point is that this country doesn’t make its own money. The coins are made at the British Royal Mint and the bank notes are made at Del la Rue, also in Britain. This country’s

banknotes are actually made from processed cotton fibres. Although the TT currency is made elsewhere, this country is responsible for the design, as well as the security and integrity and security of the currency in circulation. The ingredients used for the ink on which the banknotes are printed are kept secret.

A tour of the museum, led by museum technician Cynthia Stephenson, covers world money, the history of TT’s money and the Central Bank. There is a display on the birth of the coin, with a vast showcase of coins made in the shape of knives and spades. There are coins from places like China, as well as centuries old Greek and European coins and the smallest coin in the world, which came from India.

Stephenson said this country frequently updates its bank notes to avoid counterfeit. She said although statistics on the prevalence of counterfeiting in this country are not readily available, during Carnival and Christmas cases of forgery are prevalent.

“Money goes through a lot of changes, but when it comes back to the Central Bank, we destroy the money, which helps us to keep a track of the money in circulation at different points.

We update our banknotes frequently and whenever we do this, we ensure that the public is properly informed and educated, through community seminars throughout the country and various advertisements.” Stephenson said people need to know their rights when it comes to money, as most people throw away money once it is ripped or damaged. She said such currency can be replaced at any bank and it is illegal for shops to refuse damaged money.

The Central Bank Money Museum is open to the public Tuesdays to Fridays from 10 am to 2pm.

Source: Trinidad and Tobago's Newsday
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #79 on: October 06, 2010, 01:46:58 AM »
Came across this website today: http://www.museum-of-money.org/

That is the Feodosia Money Museum's website. Feodosia is a seaside resort in Crimea, and the local money museum has both a "walk-in" exhibition and a website with various exhibits. Some interesting stuff there, from ancient Feodosian money to modern coins from Ukraine.

The museum appears to have an English version of its website; does not work for me though. The Russian Money Museum, however, has some info in English about the museum in Feodosia here. Note that this, from a museum in Moscow, still says that Feodosia is in Ukraine ...

Christian
« Last Edit: October 08, 2014, 01:16:41 PM by chrisild »

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #80 on: October 08, 2010, 07:17:59 PM »
A coin from Sri Lanka was labelled as struck in Jaffa, which is a town in Israel, rather than Jafna, which is a mint town in Sri Lanka.

Samuel Pepys reported that Frances Stuart had posed for the copper farthings with Britannia. He was wrong. The first proofs date from before she came to London.

More details on the Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Museum (otherwise known as the Prince of Wales museum) in Mumbai. The coins and some banknotes are exhibited in chronological order, giving a historical overview of the main types of coins struck through the ages.

Even though a very considerable part of the floor space is devoted to coins, one still gets the idea that only a small selection of the coins issued is exhibited. Also, there is nothing overly creative or innovative about the exhibition. However, what is exhibited is of fantastic quality. In particular the earliest coins are in spectacular condition, with super high relief. In addition, the setup is eminently suitable for the many groups of students, who would be bored to death by more detail.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline asm

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #81 on: October 09, 2010, 11:45:24 PM »
Casa de la Moneda, The Mint – Hall Exhibition.

On a tour to Colombia, I had the opportunity to see the the Mint Hall exhibition, a permanent feature, housed in the Casa de la Moneda, the Old Mint Building. Besides the Coins, also exhibited in another part of the building is an exhibition of Paintings. All the exhibits are the property of the Central Bank “ Banco de la Republica”.

The origins of the mint date back to 1620 when King Phillip II of Spain ordered the foundation of the mint. Captain Alanso Turrilla de Yebra rented the property in the Candelaria neighbourhood of Bogota to hammer coins. It was the first mint in the continent striking Silver and Gold coins. The current structure, an example of civil architecture of the province of Nueva Granada and was designed by Spanish architect Thomas Sanchez Reciente, was completed in 1753 under the viceroy Solis.

Over 8,000 coins from the collection of Banco de la Republica  are on permanent display and include Gold as well as Silver coins, Stamping dies, Paper notes and an engraved plate used to print the paper currency. Also on display are the coin striking presses of the 18th, 19th & the 20th century. Also on display was a huge piece of gold weighing over 57 Oz., used originally to mint gold coins. Security was tight and photography in that part of the building absolutely forbidden.

Also on exhibition are some of the one ounce gold coins of the colonial era and examples of Mexican coinage circulating in Nuevo Reino de Granada. 

The mint, though currently does not operate form here and has been shifted to another area in a more secure environment outside of Bogota.

Amit









« Last Edit: October 10, 2010, 06:08:31 PM by Figleaf »
"It Is Better To Light A Candle Than To Curse The Darkness"

Offline Sir Sisu

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #82 on: October 22, 2010, 10:13:14 PM »
If you find yourself in greater Helsinki area, then you might want to also visit the Bank of Finland Museum and definitely the money chamber at the Nation Museum of Finland. Neither is spectacularly set up, but they both have great content IMO. (Unfortunately the latter link is only in Finnish. But you can always squeeze it through google translator if you're interested.)
« Last Edit: October 23, 2010, 12:31:10 AM by Figleaf »

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #83 on: October 31, 2010, 02:51:38 AM »
Colonial Williamsburg's latest buy: Money
Paper currency issued in pre-Revolution North Carolina
October 29, 2010

WILLIAMSBURG –- Colonial Williamsburg has acquired a large amount of cash, but it's not the kind the foundation can spend.

The collection of colonial paper currency was issued by North Carolina prior to the American Revolution.

Comprised of more than 6,600 notes in varying denominations issued between 1748 and 1771, the stash of cash was worth about 7,176 pounds sterling in 1775. If legal tender today, the currency would have purchasing power of more than $750,000.

Portions of the currency will be featured in a new coins and currency exhibit, “Dollars, Farthings & Fables: Money & Medals From the Colonial Williamsburg Collection,” opening in the DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum on Nov. 24.

“As the only known hoard of pre-Revolutionary War colonial paper money, the Cornell Hoard is truly exciting,” said Erik Goldstein, Colonial Williamsburg’s curator of mechanical arts and numismatics. “Not only is the sight of such a huge pile of cash stunning, but it has much to offer students of early American coins and currency.”

Named the “Cornell Hoard,” the money was collected originally by Samuel Cornell, a transplanted New Yorker who became a wealthy merchant after moving as a young man to New Bern, N.C. in the mid-1750s. In addition to his activities as a merchant, Cornell also was involved in high risk currency speculation as evidenced by the hoard of colonial currency.

In 1769 as one of the wealthiest and most influential men in the North Carolina colony, Cornell underwrote the construction of a new governor’s house in New Bern — the Tryon Palace — with a loan to the government of £8,000 in “proclamation money,” or colonial paper currency, which helped earn him an appointment to His Majesty’s Council for North Carolina.

As an ardent Loyalist, Cornell seized another opportunity in 1771 to lend a lot of cash to North Carolina. He provided £6,000 to finance a military expedition to the western part of the colony to put down a small taxation rebellion. The skirmish became known as the Battle of Alamance, considering by some to be the opening salvo of the American Revolution. In addition to his loan, Cornell also sold £483 in supplies for the expedition to the colony.

On the eve of the Revolution, Cornell left New Bern and sailed for London in 1775. After two years there, he headed to British-occupied New York City. Before his death in 1781 at the age of 50, he was apparently able to transport his monetary cache to New York. His will, which specifically mentioned the “proclamation money of North Carolina,” left most of his wealth to his five daughters.

The bundles of currency apparently remained in the family until 1913 when it was offered, along with other Cornell papers to the New York Public Library, which published the letters as “Papers Relating to Samuel Cornell, North Carolina Loyalist.” The library, in turn sold the currency in its entirety to a dealer during the 1970s, who put half the collection up for sale. The other half, representing about 40% of Cornell’s original stash and the last remaining intact portion, is now part of the Colonial Williamsburg numismatic collection, the gift of an anonymous donor.

Source: The Virginia Gazette

Photo caption: Colonial Williamsburg recently bought a hoard of colonial currency that is the equivalent of $750,000 in today's dollar.
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #84 on: October 31, 2010, 11:33:11 PM »
Accrington museum treasures on display at last
21st September 2010

KEY treasures from the former Accrington Museum are on show for the first time since its closure at the start of the Second World War.

Items including a Greek coin from 425BC and the ‘death penny’ presented to the families of fallen First World War soliders can be viewed after decades in storage.

They form part of a Commemorations Exhibition at the Haworth Art Gallery of more than 100 items which have not been seen since the former Accrington Museum in Oakhill Park closed.

Curators at the Haworth said the items have been in their archives for some time, but were not in any condition to be viewed until now.

Thanks to a £5000 grant from the Museums, Libraries and Archives Council coins and memorial items have now finally been restored to their former glory.

Key items from Hyndburn’s past are also included in the exhibition, such as a commemorative key which markes the opening of Accrington St Mary Magdalene’s School in 1892.

A plaque also shows how the people of Accrington adopted HMS Boadicea - a B-class destroyer in 1942.

Learning and Access officer Yvonne Robbins said: “These items certainly have not been seen since the old museum closed, and we do not know for sure the last time they were displayed before that.

“There are many, many coins and comemorative items which give you a real glimpse into the area’s past.

“There are so many interesting items on display that we have put together a guide called the ‘discovery trail’ which will help visitors identify and find out about various objects in the Commemorations exhibition.”

Source: This is Lancashire
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #85 on: October 31, 2010, 11:53:47 PM »
Coin discovery sheds light on Malta’s numismatic history
20, September, 2010

The Central Bank of Malta has recently acquired a Fatimid quarter dinar minted in Malta during the Arab period to add to its numismatic collection. The significance of this acquisition lies in the fact that, until this quarter dinar was discovered, no Muslim coin bearing the mint name of Malta was known to exist, leading numismatists to believe that no Muslim coinage was ever minted on the island. The discovery of this coin can, therefore, be considered as one of the most significant developments in Malta’s numismatic history.

The quarter dinar was minted in 1080/81 during the reign of al-Mustansir (1036-1094), one of the longest-reigning Fatimid caliphs. It is made of fine gold and has inscriptions in Kufic script, an early Arabic calligraphy. It was discovered by Andre P de Clermont, an international expert on Islamic coins, when this coin was offered for sale in the UK late in 2008. Other world renowned experts have confirmed de Clermont’s claim regarding the Malta attribution.

The quarter dinar will be exhibited for the first time on Saturday, the 25th of September 2010, when the Bank will be opening its numismatic collection to the public during the Notte Bianca from 18:00 to 23:00. A number of Fatimid dinars and quarter dinars from the collection of Maltese numismatist Emmanuel Azzopardi will also be exhibited.

The Bank’s collection also includes coins used in Malta since the Punic era, together with all the coins and banknotes issued by the Central Bank of Malta since its foundation in 1968. It is housed in the Bank’s main premises at Castille Place, Valletta and may be visited by the public during office hours.

Source: Gozo news
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #86 on: November 11, 2010, 08:57:58 AM »
Numismatic museum to show coins, notes from 220 countries
Laxmi Birajdar, TNN, Nov 11, 2010

PUNE: Sporting a collection of 60,000 currency notes and over 25,000 coins from 220 countries, the Yashlaxmi numismatic museum, set up by Narendra Tole, will be the first of its kind museum in the city.

Historian Babasaheb Purandare will inaugurate the museum at Natraj Society in Kothrud on November 15. General public can visit the place from November 22 onwards. The museum will house special sections on colonial currency, silver coins from ancient India and a range of contemporary coins from Europe, America and Australia. Sections in the museum have been dedicated to coinage from 6th and 4th century BC India, minted silver coins from the British colonial rule starting 1835 and coins from all former colonies of Britain. Besides it will house the Portuguese, Dutch and French coinage in India, commemorative coins from the Mughal era and Indian currency notes in various denomination after 1947.

Tole is an avid numismatist for the last 40 years. He has sourced his treasures from family, friends and fellow numismatists. A vast display at the museum sports recent coinage that goes a few years back, for instance gold coins from South Africa and Malawi featuring endangered animal species, special one-kilo silver coin from Australia, exquisite silver coinage from Cook Island, Israel, Guernsey, Bahrain, Indonesia and the like. Foreign proof sets and currency notes from various countries, that go back just a few years, are another feature of the museum.

"I have been collecting coins of various countries by exchanging them as well as requesting foreign tourists to part with some of their change money to aid my collection. We've been able to source most of the recent Indian coinage from the Reserve Bank of India as well," said Tole. He hopes the museum will serve an academic purpose as well. "Once the museum opens, we will bring school students from class 8, 9 and 10 for visits here. Lectures and interactive sessions on numismatics and various aspects of coin collection will also be planned," he added.

A member of the Numismatic Society of Maharashtra, Pune, Tole also purchased coin sets by placing orders with governments of various countries. He was assisted in the museum layout and planning by the International Collectors' Society of Rare Items, Pune.

Source: Times of India
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Bimat

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #87 on: November 11, 2010, 11:31:14 AM »
Will try to visit the museum in my next visit to Pune (probably in December, have to attend several boring wedding ceremonies ::))

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #88 on: November 25, 2010, 02:08:49 PM »
If anybody plans to visit the Monnaie de Paris mint museum in Paris in the next couple of months ... forget it. Currently it is closed for renovation, but while the original plan was to re-open the museum in late 2012, the website now says "mid 2013".

Christian

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Holiday guide - museums
« Reply #89 on: November 26, 2010, 06:32:38 PM »
Cornish coin used in emergency battle to beat Caesar goes home in coup for Royal Cornwall Museum
By Culture24 Staff | 25 November 2010

In June 1749, a solid gold coin was found on a hilltop at Carn Brea, slightly to the west of a set of Neolithic earthworks which formed an Iron Age hill fort.

Identified as a Westerham Type gold stater, it went on to be illustrated by Cornish geologist William Borlase in his oracular Antiquities of Cornwall in 1769, but then disappeared entirely.

Centuries on, this rare insight into ancient times is about to go back on show at the Royal Cornwall Museum in Truro.

“We are absolutely delighted to have acquired the coin,” says Jane Marley, the Curator of Archaeology and World Cultures at the Museum.

“It represents an important part of Cornish history and, as such, is causing a lot of excitement amongst local historians.”


The coin was originally discovered in 1749
© Bernie Pettersen
Their enthusiasm is understandable – of the original stack of more than 20 coins found, five are held by the Ashmolean Museum, one is in the British Museum and another is held in the museum collection at Chur in Switzerland, with the rest missing.

Figures from Oxford University and the Royal Institute of Cornwall joined the county’s Heritage Trust and Archaeological Society in funding the effort to buy the Cornish survivor when it reappeared in London earlier this year, signifying the importance of a piece thought to have been issued as emergency war money to fund British battles against Julius Caesar in 54 BC.

One side shows a disjointed horse with three tail lines, framed against a series of pellets and zig-zag patterns, although experts have had to concede defeat in attempting to pinpoint the flipside, which they say is “indistinct”.

Having ended a 261-year wait to restore the tiny treasure, perhaps it’s a good thing that it retains some of its mystery.

Source: Culture 24

Photo by Bernie Pettersen, caption: The coin was originally discovered in 1749
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.