Sets with all sub-unit denominations in words

Started by <k>, December 09, 2012, 06:22:26 PM

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<k>

First let me explain that I am restricting myself to sub-units here. For example, the dollar is a unit, the cent is a sub-unit. Even if a coinage consistently expresses its sub-units all in numerals, or all in words, any denominations expressed in the top unit are often inconsistent with the pattern of the sub-unit denominations. For instance, the Falkland Islands sub-denominational coins all carry a simple numeral (e.g. 1, 2, 5, 10, 20 or 50), but the pound coin carries its denomination in words: "ONE POUND". And whether the denomination on a dollar coin of any country is expressed as "$1", "1 DOLLAR" or "ONE DOLLAR" is highly variable, however the lower denominations are expressed.

Furthermore, I will deal with only those sets where ALL the sub-denominations are expressed in words. To give an example, in the reign of King George V, all the sub-denominations of the UK were expressed in word - EXCEPT for the silver threepence, which carried the numeral 3.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#1
UKPre-DecimalB.jpg

From 1936 onward, the sub-denominational units of the UK's pre-decimal coinage were all expressed in words only.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#2


From 1968 to 1981, UK decimal coins carried either numerals, or both words and numerals, e.g. "5 NEW PENCE"  or "5 FIVE PENCE".

Since 2008 the decimal sub-units have all been expressed in words.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



All Australia's pre-decimal coins fit into this topic - the decimal cent/s denominations do not.

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#4



The Bahamas coins, upon independence, fitted this topic.

However, since 2005 they have introduced new 1 cent and 10 cent coins with new designs.

These both carry numerals rather than words.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



The decimal sub-unit coins of Barbados carry words only.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



The same is true of Bermuda.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#7





Fiji followed the same pattern with its pre-decimal coins, but not with its decimal coinage.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#8


Ghana's pre-decimal coins fit the bill.

Its decimal coins do too, but only until 1991, when words were replaced by numerals.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#9


Guernsey's pre-decimal coins only fit this topic from 1956 onwards, with their new design series.

Their decimal coins use both numerals and words.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>







The Isle of Man issued two design series in the 1970s, and both fit this topic. Since 1980 its sub-unit coins have used numerals only.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#11
Jamaica set 1969.jpg

Jamaica's pre-decimal coins fit the bill.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#12





Jamaica's first decimal coins used both numerals and words. Only in the 1990s were word alone used.

Now in the 21st century, they use numerals (but not both).
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#13








Jersey's coins, both decimal and pre-decimal, all fit the bill.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#14



New Guinea's coins from 1936 to 1945 all fit the bill.

Between 1929 and 1935 they carried numerals, however.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.