News:

Sign up for the monthly zoom events by sending a PM with your email address to Hitesh

Main Menu

Sets without a sub-unit indicator

Started by <k>, December 02, 2012, 08:03:27 PM

Previous topic - Next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

<k>

A currency typically consists of units and sub-units, e.g. dollars and cents, pounds and pence, etc.

A dollar coin may be marked as '$1', '1 DOLLAR', or 'ONE DOLLAR' - never just as 'ONE' or '1'.

Similarly, a five cents coin may be marked as "5c", "5 CENTS", or "FIVE CENTS". However, some coins omit the sub-unit indicator, so that you only get a numeral: "5". In such cases it is always given as a numeral and never a word. Coins denominated in the top unit (dollars, pounds, rupees) ALWAYS include a unit indicator.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#1
The Australian decimal series omits a sub-unit indicator.



Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#2
The same applies to the New Zealand's decimal coins, with two exceptions:

The bimetallic 50 cents coins issued in sets only.






And the doubly-denominated 10 cents/ one shilling coin of the 1960s.



Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#3
CookIslands20tene.jpg


CookIslands5c.jpg

The Cook Islands modelled its now defunct coinage on New Zealand's and omitted the sub-unit indicator.

There was a single exception to this in the 1980s, however: the 50 cents or 50 tene coin.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#4
The Falkland Islands are another example.



Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#5
Ditto the Cayman Islands.

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#6
From 1980 to date, the Isle of Man has omitted sub-unit indicators.




But throughout the 1970s, a sub-unit indicator was always included.

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#7


From independence in 1960 until it joined the euro, Cyprus omitted the sub-unit indicator from its coins.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

These are the only pure examples I can find, and they all come within the British sphere of cultural influence. Do you know of any more?
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#9


Iceland has sometimes omitted the sub-unit indicator from one side of the coin, but the other side always identifies the sub-unit.

5 aurar coin, 1981.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#10
Slovenia 10st 1992.jpg

The late and much lamented pre-euro set of Slovenia showed the denomination on both sides, but the reverse showed the numerals only, without a sub-unit indicator, whereas the obverse showed both the numerals and also the denomination in words.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

FosseWay

#11
The pre-WW1 Austrian heller coins had no currency name. Here is the standard set issued from the 1890s until the start of WW1:

4126a.jpg


619.jpg


1439.jpg


1441.jpg

FosseWay

#12
And the later WW1 issues also had no currency name:

1462.jpg


1440.jpg


7243.jpg

chrisild

And since they have no country name either, those pieces still confuse new collectors today. ;)

The Swiss rappen/centimes/raps/centesimi coins are "digits only" too. That applies to the "1" and "2" coins (not in circulation any more) but also to the "5", "10" and "20".



Christian

<k>

Quote from: chrisild on December 04, 2012, 11:13:28 AM
And since they have no country name either, those pieces still confuse new collectors today. ;)

Swiss Confederation is not a country name? Granted, they are not a confederation at all but a federation, and should be sued for misleading people.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.