Author Topic: Beavers on coins  (Read 2671 times)

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Offline <k>

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Beavers on coins
« on: October 08, 2012, 03:16:17 AM »
Canada, 5 cents, 1937.  Beaver.
« Last Edit: July 07, 2017, 02:49:25 PM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: Beavers on coins
« Reply #1 on: October 08, 2012, 03:16:59 AM »
Canada, 5 cents, 1947.  Beaver.

Offline <k>

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Re: Beavers on coins
« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2012, 03:17:38 AM »
Canada, 3 dollars (gold-plated silver), 2006.  Beaver.

Offline <k>

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Re: Beavers on coins
« Reply #3 on: October 08, 2012, 03:18:10 AM »
Poland, 100 zloty, 1978.  Beaver.

Offline Prosit

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    • Austrian Coins, Tokens and Medals
Re: Beavers on coins
« Reply #4 on: October 08, 2012, 03:37:46 AM »
I never considered porcupines or beavers to be rodents. Here we have a creature called a Nutria. I have actually captured a young one and other than the tail they look like bevers but smaller. Native to South America...along with other changes in bio diversity they seem to be moving north. Doubt it is on a coin though.
Dale

Offline <k>

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Re: Beavers on coins
« Reply #5 on: October 08, 2012, 03:42:05 AM »
I never considered porcupines or beavers to be rodents.

Me neither, until I read Wikipedia. Folk biology and the real stuff don't always coincide.

Here we have a creature called a Nutria. I have actually captured a young one and other than the tail they look like beavers but smaller. Native to South America...along with other changes in bio diversity they seem to be moving north. Doubt it is on a coin though.
Dale
Apparently they are "mustelids" and therefore related to otters but not beavers. And I do have a nutria in this topic:

Otters on coins
« Last Edit: October 10, 2012, 06:04:18 PM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: Beavers on coins
« Reply #6 on: October 09, 2012, 01:50:23 AM »
Belarus, 1 rouble, 2002.  Beavers.

Offline <k>

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Re: Beavers on coins
« Reply #7 on: October 10, 2012, 06:40:58 PM »
Hungary, 3000 forints, 2000.

Offline <k>

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Re: Beavers on coins
« Reply #8 on: October 10, 2012, 06:42:02 PM »
Russia, 100 roubles, 2008.

Offline <k>

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Re: Beavers on coins
« Reply #9 on: October 10, 2012, 06:42:28 PM »
Russia, 3 roubles, 2008.

Offline <k>

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Re: Beavers on coins
« Reply #10 on: October 10, 2012, 07:34:44 PM »
USA, half dollar, 1936.

Offline Prosit

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Re: Beavers on coins
« Reply #11 on: October 10, 2012, 08:15:52 PM »
In spite of it having a very nice beaver it in it, it is better known as the Albany half and likely will cost 300-500 USD for an example.
Dale

Quote from: <k>
USA, half dollar, 1936.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Beavers on coins
« Reply #12 on: March 02, 2015, 11:33:07 PM »
The North-West Company issued tokens with a value of one prepared beaver skin in 1820. This is the only known un-holed specimen. Its big competitor, the Hudson Bay Company, did likewise, but with less nice tokens. Source: currency museum of the Bank of Canada.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.