Author Topic: Other insects on coins  (Read 6723 times)

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Offline <k>

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Other insects on coins
« on: June 01, 2011, 11:08:16 PM »
See also:

1] Bees on coins

2] Butterflies and caterpillars



San Marino. Spiders.
« Last Edit: October 13, 2012, 12:20:07 AM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: Other insects on coins
« Reply #1 on: June 04, 2011, 12:07:02 AM »
Middlesex, England.

Stinton's. Halfpenny token 1795. A grasshopper to l., FINE. TEAS. OF. THE. ROUGH. FLAVOUR
« Last Edit: June 11, 2019, 11:07:18 PM by <k> »

Offline Prosit

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Re: Other insects on coins
« Reply #2 on: August 18, 2011, 08:54:19 PM »
Not exactly a coin...and it isn't mine  :'(  I call it old Bugs!  I just had to show it...and well, this seems like nearly a good spot  ;)
Ain't it boootiful!

Dale
« Last Edit: June 11, 2019, 06:36:26 AM by <k> »

Online Figleaf

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Re: Other insects on coins
« Reply #3 on: August 19, 2011, 01:52:14 AM »
The text translates as: an uninvited guest / from foreign countries / Burdens field and forest

In view of the date, I think there is a good chance that this refers to soldiers from both sides of the war of the Austrian succession. If I remember correctly, two successive harvests failed because of volcanic ash from the Mediterranean blocking the sunlight. Prices shot up and the war made it all worse. Rulers on both sides tried to persuade farmers to plant a new crop: potatoes. The farmers in Austria refused out of suspicion and conservatism, but those in Prussia did change: Frederick posted some armed soldiers around potato fields, making the farmers believe potatoes were very valuable.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Prosit

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Re: Other insects on coins
« Reply #4 on: August 19, 2011, 02:20:36 AM »
I assumed it was an actual insect infestation.
Partial Quote from something I found on the internet

"...Even this happy island, so remarkably distinguished by its exemption from most of those scourges to which other nations are exposed, was once alarmed by the appearance of locusts. In 1748 they were observed here in considerable numbers, but providentially they soon perished without propagating. These were evidently stragglers from the vast swarms which in the preceding year did such infinite damage in Wallachia, Moldavia, Transylvania, Hungary, and Poland. One of these swarms, which entered Transylvania in August, was several hundred fathoms in width, (at Vienna the breadth of one of them was three miles,) and extended to so great a length, as to be four hours in passing over the Red Tower; and such was its density, that it totally intercepted the solar light, so that when they flew low, one person could not see another at the distance of twenty paces....'''

PS it is supposed to be a medal from Silesia....  I do not know however.

Dale
« Last Edit: October 08, 2012, 09:59:48 PM by <k> »

Online Figleaf

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Re: Other insects on coins
« Reply #5 on: August 19, 2011, 10:58:14 AM »
Well, there you are. Silesia wouldn't fit the  Austrian succession wars. Southern Germany would.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Other insects on coins
« Reply #6 on: August 19, 2011, 12:00:17 PM »
Had never seen that medal before, but it does look interesting. So I searched a little, and ... Johann Christian Kundmann wrote a book about (and shortly after) the 1748 "invasion" of the locusts in Silesia, see here: http://books.google.com/books/about/Anmerckungen_ueber_die_Heuschrecken_in_S.html?id=SBOOZwEACAAJ  He also mentions that medal, and says it was designed by "the famous Wilhelm Kittel from Breßlau" (see the attached screenshot from Google Books). This "Breßlau" would be Breslau in modern German, and Wrocław in Polish ...

Christian

Offline <k>

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Re: Other insects on coins
« Reply #7 on: January 02, 2012, 02:24:20 PM »
Poland, 1997, 2 zloty.  Stag beetle.
« Last Edit: March 24, 2019, 08:09:51 PM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: Other insects on coins
« Reply #8 on: October 08, 2012, 10:21:07 PM »
San Marino, 1 lira, 1974.   Ant.
« Last Edit: October 09, 2012, 10:32:12 PM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: Other insects on coins
« Reply #9 on: October 09, 2012, 10:23:40 PM »
Latvia, 1 lats, 2003.  Red ant.

Offline <k>

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Re: Other insects on coins
« Reply #10 on: October 09, 2012, 10:23:52 PM »
San Marino, 2 lire.  Beetle.
« Last Edit: March 24, 2019, 08:10:24 PM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: Other insects on coins
« Reply #11 on: October 09, 2012, 10:31:49 PM »
Bermuda, 2 dollars, 1990.   Cicadas.
« Last Edit: March 13, 2019, 02:38:15 AM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: Other insects on coins
« Reply #12 on: October 12, 2012, 06:48:41 PM »
Ukraine, 2006, 10 hryvnia.  Grasshopper.

Offline <k>

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Re: Other insects on coins
« Reply #13 on: October 12, 2012, 06:50:35 PM »
Tokelau, 5 dollars, 2012.  Dragonfly. 

For once this new gimmick of embedding coloured glass in collector coins works well.

Offline <k>

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Re: Other insects on coins
« Reply #14 on: October 14, 2012, 08:32:48 PM »
Russia, 2 roubles, 2012.  Emerald rosalia beetle.