Unrealised Nigerian set by David Cornell (1975)

Started by <k>, September 23, 2012, 05:03:40 PM

Previous topic - Next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

<k>

David Cornell is the British artist and sculptor who designed the Diana memorial five pound coin for the UK. He has kindly sent me images of some sketches he produced for a proposed new Nigerian design series while he was artistic director of the Franklin Mint. He cannot now remember any details about what happened or why, but the designs would in my opinion have made a superb set, far superior to the actual set that was issued in the 1970s.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#1
½ kobo.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#2
1 kobo.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#3
5 kobo.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#4
10 kobo.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#5
25 kobo.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#6
50 kobo.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#7
1 naira.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#8
5 naira.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#9
The obverse of the proposed Nigerian set.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Such a pity that these designs were never adopted. There is much to admire here. When the Nigerians were discussing their coinage requirements with the Royal Mint back in the mid-1960s, they stressed that they did not want any designs of animals. I imagine that was because of the restrictions of the religion that holds sway in Northern Nigeria. So why then does the Nigerian coat of arms depict two horses and an eagle? But that it is a different matter.

Anyway, Mr Cornell chose a very different tack, involving historical Nigerian artefacts, with fascinating results. The themes of this set remind me of another unrealised set: Unrealised Ghanaian designs
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

My own favourite among these designs is the 1 naira. Being English, I am in any case biased in favour of the equilateral curve heptagon, as the seven-sided shape is known, since the format originated in the UK.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Figleaf

WOW! Now that would have been a superb series! At last something different, stark and with plenty character. The wide variety in subjects, the strong style, the genuine African art, all are a far cry from the usual greedy despot with a Cayman Islands bank account paired with a phony "coat of arms". African art has class and these designs show it. Just replace those ersatz European "arms" with a strong numeral/nature combination or numerals with African textile designs that scare the innards out of traditionalists please.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

<k>

Click on the link below to access David Cornell's own web site:

David Cornell
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Afrasi

Great work!

I may be wrong, but I think most - if not all - designs refer to the Black African South of Nigeria. The government is directed by the Haussa people in Northern Nigeria.
Perhaps this was a reason not to mint these interesting sketches.  ???