Author Topic: Misc: Token or Coin? 1947 Jaya Hind  (Read 15045 times)

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Offline Rangnath

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Misc: Token or Coin? 1947 Jaya Hind
« on: June 05, 2008, 01:51:42 AM »
I noticed this coin for sale and thought to myself "What is this?"  I guess that it is a token.  Does anyone know?
The information was only:
INDIA
AZAD HIND
15 TH AUGUST 1947
COIN
REAR
OBVERSE:   MAP OF INDIA
REVERSE:   FLAG OF INDIA
EDGED:       PLAIN
SHAPE:        DIAMOND
METAL:       COPPER NICKEL

richie

« Last Edit: February 20, 2015, 09:54:04 AM by dheer »

translateltd

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Re: Token or Coin? 1947 Jaya Hind
« Reply #1 on: June 05, 2008, 10:58:41 AM »
There is a helpful note in KM under KM#4.1 (2 annas 1950): "A similar shaped independence commemorative issued in 1947, bearing a map of India, circulated to some degree as a 2 anna coin.  So that sounds like your answer - I suspect these may have been overstruck on two-anna coins in any case.

There is also a similar note under KM 3.1 (1 anna 1950), so there must also be slightly smaller independence medalets with a scalloped edge.

Martin
NZ

Offline Oesho

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Re: Token or Coin? 1947 Jaya Hind
« Reply #2 on: June 05, 2008, 02:38:18 PM »
The inscription above the flag reads Jay Hind; below 15 August 1947
The Hindi-legend on the reverse reads: Azad Hind and below 15 August 1947 again.
They are of exactly the same size as the 2 Anna coins (KM#4.1 & 4.2), which in turn are of the same size and shape as the Imperial 2 annas (KM#540 – 543).
The accompanying piece is not scalloped, as mentioned in KM, but round and has the same inscription as the ‘square’ piece. I has the similar diameter as the Imperial ½ pice (KM#528) and the 1 pice issues of the Indian Republic (KM#1)
Because of the exact size to the Imperial coins and the subsequent issues of the Indian Republic, they must have been struck at the Government mint as memento of the Independence of India, which took place on 15 August 1947.

(The following are a)  number of objects which
illustrate the Indian Idependance Movement:

Those mementos of Independence forms a part of a whole series of historical
tokens, issued during the Indian Independence Movement. Some were issued as
contemporary religious tokens. The period of issue is circa 1942 – 1947.
Some examples of those medals and tokens:
1)    The accompanying round piece with the same inscription as the ‘square’
piece. I has the similar diameter as the Imperial ½ pice (KM#528) and the 1
pice issues of the Indian Republic (KM#1)
2)    Silver medal of Mahatma Ghandi, Devanagari legend: Azad Hind / Samvat
1999 (Free India, VS 1999 [=1942]) Rev. Pre-partition map of India, with
Devanagari inscription superimposed – Vande Mataram (Long live the
Motherland).  It’s the national song of India, distinct from the national
anthem of India "Jana Gana Mana”.
3)    Another Mahatma Ghandi medal, but in silver-washed brass, issued on the
occasion of his 75th birthday. Obv. Bare headed bust of Ghandi: SUPERMAN
above, hand each side and below holding emblem. Devanagari legend:
Rashtradeva pu mahatma ji (god of the nation, who should be worshipped,
Mahatma ji). Rev. Map of pre-independence India, with the figure of Ghandi
(standing holding sstick) superimposed: flag with spinning wheel design
above. On map: Gandhi is India / 75. Margin in Devanagari: (sides) Prema –
Seva (Love – devotion), (above) Ahimsa hi mera prana hai (non-violence is my
life), (below) Sathya hi ishvara hai (he is the Lord of Truth).
4)    Small silver Indian Independence medal with the Ashok capital (The emblem
of the Indian Republic) on the obverse the  Chakra which became part of the
National Flag of India, which  the design of which was adopted by India's
constituent assembly on 22nd july, 1947. Around the name and titles of
George VI with a small crown above the Chakra. This medalet must therefore
been struck between 22-07-1947 and 15-08-1947.
5)    Many people presented their greetings in the form of medals or tokens.
One such silver medal is depicted with the pre-partition map of India with
the National Flag on it. Above 15 August; below Azad - Hind  / 1947. On the
reverse greetings for a Happy Divali. Diwali is celebrated in October /
November. And this medal must have issued during this period in 1947. NR
stands for National Refinery, Bombay.
6)    Copper medal: Indian National Flag. Rev. AUGUST 15 1947, above in
Devanagari Jay Hind and the same in Persian below. The same medal exist
without the Devanagari and Persian inscription.
7)    A peculiar example of political propaganda are countermarked coins. In
the series of historical tokens etc. of the Indian Independence Movement
only one such example is known. It shows a countermark P.G.A.H. / 1943
(Provisional Governemnt Azad Hind-1943)over the effigy of George VI. Some
people regards those countermarked coins as the work of clever
counterfeiters, but I am of the opinion that it was made for political
propaganda. Such examples of other countries are pretty well known.
8)    An interesting silver-washed brass medal of the freedom movement. On the
obverse the pre-independence map of India in the form of a lion standing to
left. Above in Devanagari: Vande Mataram (Long live the motherland) Vikrama
Samvat 2000 (1943) This is also the year that the Provisional Government
Azad Hind was installed by Subhas Chandra Bose in Singapore. The flag on the
map shows in the centre the spinning wheel. The reverse shows the figure of
the four-armed goddess Lakshmi standing on lotus with swan and elephant
either side. Above in Devanagari: Shri Lakshmi Prasannah bhav, below Labha
?? (shorthand for one and a quarter) Shubba (profitable – auspicious)

« Last Edit: June 08, 2008, 10:57:06 PM by Figleaf »

Offline Rangnath

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Re: Token or Coin? 1947 Jaya Hind
« Reply #3 on: June 05, 2008, 03:43:06 PM »
Thanks very much gentlemen. 
Same size, same metal, officially issued.. I guess one could argue that it was, at least occasionally, a coin.
 
What a pleasure to look at the objects just posted!The superman medallion brought a smile to my face as did the insipid face of the lion on the pedestal. Even Emperor Ashok would have had a laugh at that one. I have mixed feelings about the altered imperial rupee. The anti-colonial rebel in me appreciated the change.  I met people in India in the 1960’s who still awaited the triumphant return of Subhas Chandra Bose. On the other hand, I get distressed to see such a beautiful silver coin so crudely handled.  As for Laksmi, I’ve always been partial to her.
 

Richie
« Last Edit: June 05, 2008, 09:23:22 PM by Rangnath »

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Token or Coin? 1947 Jaya Hind
« Reply #4 on: June 08, 2008, 11:09:03 PM »
Amazingly, all these pieces use a map that seems to include more than what is now India, Pakistan and Bangla Desh...

My approach to the counterstamped Rupee is different. I consider coins political propaganda on utilitarian objects, so one piece of propaganda stamped on another not only has a certain logic, it's also an ancient tradition, alive even in our times.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Rangnath

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Re: Token or Coin? 1947 Jaya Hind
« Reply #5 on: June 09, 2008, 05:26:01 AM »
I understand your position and I agree to a point.  I tend to see the flan as a canvas.  Sometimes, for some coins, the designer attempted to place the elements on the flan in such a way as to achieve “unity”.  If the portrait of the King is just a shade to the right or the left, unity would be lost through lack of balance, for example.  Letters to the right and to the left of center are composed to add to this formal balance.  Of course this depends on the “artist’s” intentions.
Sometimes, a future artist will make an adjustment to an older work of art and create something new, even better.  Some counter stamps might be like that, and sometimes they are more like vandalism (interesting term in light of your Roman example, right?) or the tagging of graffiti.
Yes, the map of India was larger then.  Wishful thinking?
richie 

Offline Rangnath

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Re: Token or Coin? 1947 Jaya Hind
« Reply #6 on: June 19, 2008, 04:47:32 AM »
I think that Martin had the truth of the matter.  In this case, a medal entered into general circulation as a coin for a brief period of time somewhere in India. So, this seems to be the gray area between Medals and Coins. I did buy it. Not because it was a coin, but because of the discussion above.  It now has "Provenance", at least for me.
richie

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Token or Coin? 1947 Jaya Hind
« Reply #7 on: June 22, 2008, 12:20:45 AM »
Congrats on the purchase, Rangnath. These pieces are great illustrations of the story your coins tell; they enhance the collection whether or not they were used as money.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Galapagos

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Re: Token or Coin? 1947 Jaya Hind
« Reply #8 on: August 12, 2009, 04:03:49 PM »
When I was collecting stamps of World War II, I bought some of the propaganda stamps produced by the Nazis for Azad Hind. See Wikipedia:-


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Azad_Hind_stamps

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Azadhindpostage.jpg


And here is another informative page:-

http://axis101.bizland.com/IndianStamps.htm

The stamps were designed by the well-known German team of Axter-Heudtlass, who produced so many stunning designs for the Third Reich.

Offline Rangnath

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Re: Token or Coin? 1947 Jaya Hind
« Reply #9 on: August 12, 2009, 04:39:17 PM »
Hi Aidan. Thanks for drawing attention to the Jaya Hind Token/coin.  It gave me another opportunity to look at Oesho's stunning examples! But to answer your question: no.
And thanks Squadron. That was interesting reading! 
richie

Offline Kid Romeo

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Re: Token or Coin? 1947 Jaya Hind
« Reply #10 on: August 12, 2009, 07:37:05 PM »
When I was collecting stamps of World War II, I bought some of the propaganda stamps produced by the Nazis for Azad Hind. See Wikipedia:-


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Azad_Hind_stamps

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Azadhindpostage.jpg


And here is another informative page:-

http://axis101.bizland.com/IndianStamps.htm

The stamps were designed by the well-known German team of Axter-Heudtlass, who produced so many stunning designs for the Third Reich.

I have these stamps in my collection too.
Nazi propaganda or not; these stamps were used by Calcutta G.P.O. on FDCs of two Indian commemorative stamps on 23 Jan 1964.

Offline Ruchi

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Re: Misc: Token or Coin? 1947 Jaya Hind
« Reply #11 on: July 15, 2018, 05:16:54 AM »
Hi
Copper medal: Indian national flag. Rev. August 15 , 1947, above in Devanagari jai hind and same in Persian below. I own this medal. Can anybody let me know more about. Is it a part of heritage???

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Misc: Token or Coin? 1947 Jaya Hind
« Reply #12 on: July 15, 2018, 09:52:46 AM »
In the absence of documentary evidence, not much can be said about it, as the medal does not give many clues.

Obviously, it was made to wear. 

It may have been sold as a souvenir during independence celebrations, though not necessarily in 1947. The Indian flag depicted was adopted on 22nd July 1947, so the medal was struck later. There are only two weeks between the adoption the flag and the date on the medal. That seems a bit short to make and execute the design.

It is professionally made; note the fine and regular raised edge and how the hole was punched out separately with part of the circle, indicating the proper place for the hole, still visible. This is standard mint procedure for holed coins. The medal is possibly a product of one of the official Indian mints.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Ruchi

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Re: Misc: Token or Coin? 1947 Jaya Hind
« Reply #13 on: July 15, 2018, 11:25:16 AM »
Thanks sir,

I just want to know that has it any value? May I trade it ?

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Misc: Token or Coin? 1947 Jaya Hind
« Reply #14 on: July 15, 2018, 12:16:17 PM »
You don't need permission to trade it. It's up to you to find prospective traders, though. If you are looking for a trade, post your medal here. If you want to sell, post it here, but make sure you have read and understood the rules here and down in reply #3.

For a short treatise on value, look here. Basically, buyer and seller decide the price. There are few or no sales statistics or catalogue quotes, so giving even a ballpark figure is impossible.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.