Jaisalmir Rupee of Ranjit Singh

Started by Rangnath, May 29, 2008, 10:13:42 PM

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Rangnath

I realize that cataloging coins is an inexact science.  I am posting this rupee, 10.5 grams, of Ranjit Singh (While all Sikhs are Singhs, not all Singhs are Sikhs and my guess is that Ranjit was a Hindu, right?), 1846 to 1864, with the hope of nailing down the identification.  Is this rupee round (Km 21) or octagonal (km 21a)? 
I imagine that a 150 years ago, a roll of silver was formed, much like a snake of clay, from which slices were cut for flans.  Perhaps the original order called for round rupees. No problem and round coins were the result. 
Jaisalmir sits in the desert territory and is a part of what is now called Rajasthan. I would expect to see camel caravans with women with brightly covered clothes, mirrored and embroidered.
Perhaps one hot summer's evening, the mint master wanted to try something a bit new and ordered his crew to form octagonal flans.  That will be easy, said the overfed, insensitive and incompetent crew chief. His efforts were used, regardless of quality. Some attempts look vaguely octagonal, some look vaguely round and some are in-between.  At least that is how I imagine it to have been. 
In the catalog, it says that Km 21b, a square version, and km 21c, a hexagonal one, were cut from sheet metal.  Interesting. Perhaps that allowed for greater accuracy, or perhaps the mint master got a new crew after he saw what they did with octagonal and round.
richie

Rangnath

Seeing the old city of Jaisalmir is like looking back into the distant past.
Oesho was kind enough to have these posted:

Overlord

Beautiful pictures. Thanks for posting.

Figleaf

 :P The pics made me want to stop work and catch a plane. My wife stopped me while I shut down the computer and made the point that catching planes cost money. Sigh. :(

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

maudry

Indeed beautiful pictures of Jaisalmir.
I recently got this coin which also looks vaguely octagonal. Just wondering which reference it should get?
Weight is exactly 10.50gr.

asm

The close up of the coat of arms of the state reads clearly that the name of the state was Jaisalmer. I wonder what is the reason that SCWC keeps calling the state Jaisalmir?

Amit
"It Is Better To Light A Candle Than To Curse The Darkness"

capnbirdseye

Quote from: asm on August 05, 2016, 08:03:13 AM
The close up of the coat of arms of the state reads clearly that the name of the state was Jaisalmer. I wonder what is the reason that SCWC keeps calling the state Jaisalmir?

Amit

Incorrect spellings are common in publications of Indian coins and on coin groups though, I expect like many others they also put Dehli instead of the correct ancient spelling of Dehli, H before L is very clear on the coins. دهلی.   
Vic

Figleaf

Compliments for the photo, maudry. They are worthy of Oesho's delightful atmosphere pictures.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

asm

Quote from: capnbirdseye on August 05, 2016, 10:35:29 AM
Incorrect spellings are common in publications of Indian coins and on coin groups.............
The last edition of the SAC was edited and printed in India by Indians........... which is why my question?

Amit

PS: this is in line with my question as to why coins of the Princely states issued in the name of the Mughal Empiror are still classified as Mughal coins?
"It Is Better To Light A Candle Than To Curse The Darkness"