Author Topic: J. T. Parrish, Newcastle-on-Tyne  (Read 13403 times)

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Offline Figleaf

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J. T. Parrish, Newcastle-on-Tyne
« on: July 17, 2012, 02:35:51 PM »
Penny, Zinc, 4.0 grams, 25.6 mm. This one is identified, but fun to show. The id came from the net, from someone who actually knew the store and has a halfpenny, so my guess is that we are talking about the 1940s or 50s.

It's a shop that used to be on Shields Road, Byker. I used to go there when I was a lad.

Several buildings are from that period, but, with Google maps, I found a sign saying "Parrish Court" near nr. 188 on a building that could well have been a department store in earlier times.

I suppose the hole is a cancellation mark. I don't quite understand what good cancelling a token does to anybody...

The following types are illustrated in this thread:

halfpennybrassround
halfpennyzincround
pennybrassround
pennybronzeround
pennyzincround
pennyfiberround
2 pfiberround
sixpencealuminiumround
shillingaluminiumround
florinaluminiumround
half poundbrassundulated
poundbrass10-sided
five poundsbronzeround

Peter
« Last Edit: May 01, 2019, 09:46:21 AM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Dave13

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Re: Penny, J. T. Parrish, Newcastle-on-Tyne
« Reply #1 on: July 17, 2012, 03:27:51 PM »
Hi, Im the person who posted the 1/2 penny token, I also have a 1d token but mines copper same as yours without the hole. I also have a 1/- One Shilling token with the building on it. I've done street view on google maps and Parrish court is to the best of my recollection Parrish's the shop.
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Penny, J. T. Parrish, Newcastle-on-Tyne
« Reply #2 on: July 17, 2012, 04:21:06 PM »
Do you remember what they were being used for? A similar token, discussed before was reckoned to be toilet access. That doesn't explain a shilling, though.

Also, can you give the series a date range?

Peter
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Offline FosseWay

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Re: Penny, J. T. Parrish, Newcastle-on-Tyne
« Reply #3 on: July 17, 2012, 06:31:19 PM »
Do you remember what they were being used for? A similar token, discussed before was reckoned to be toilet access. That doesn't explain a shilling, though.

Or a halfpenny, come to that... unless they were in the habit of asking you what you were going to do in there before you went in!

Offline Dave13

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Re: Penny, J. T. Parrish, Newcastle-on-Tyne
« Reply #4 on: July 17, 2012, 08:02:51 PM »
As I understand  shop tokens they are a bit like loyalty cards today you would sign up with a shop and get a card which would be marked every time you bought something. At the end of a period of time you could cash in your card and you would get a percentage of what you had spent back in the form of tokens to spend in the shop. To keep the customer coming back tokens would be given as change for tokens for example if i bought something for 1d and used my one shilling token i would get 11d change in tokens so you would never get cash as change which you could spend out side of the shop.
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Offline Dave13

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Re: Penny, J. T. Parrish, Newcastle-on-Tyne
« Reply #5 on: July 18, 2012, 08:21:53 AM »
I have found out that J.T. Parrish
closed in 1984 after nearly 100 yrs . So our tokens could be date from 1884 to 1971 when decimalisation was introduced.

A further thought about your zinc token during world war 1 &2 a lot of countries introduced zinc coinage when brass and copper got short due to the demands of war I wonder if that might be why they made zinc tokens.
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Offline malj1

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Re: Penny, J. T. Parrish, Newcastle-on-Tyne
« Reply #6 on: July 18, 2012, 09:27:37 AM »
A few quotes from an article ‘Retailers Tokens’ by the late Denzil Webb from Coin News, Sept.2010, will perhaps help to explain their use and also give some indication of the date range.

      ... with the establishment of "Mutuality Clubs", …..but it was not until the 1920s that the practice became widespread. Mutuality trading was a system whereby customers could obtain goods with vouchers, repayment being made by instalments, together with reasonable poundage, to collectors. It would have been possible for a customer to buy, say, ten shillings worth of goods with a £2 voucher and obtain £1.10s change which in all probability would be spent elsewhere, were it not for the fact that the Societies' safeguarded themselves from such obvious abuse by giving the necessary change in the form of tokens. These tokens became known as "Club change". Credit trading became widespread in the 1920s and '30s, and tokens were frequently issued by drapers, many of them quite small businesses. Large department stores, which would appear to mainly date to around the turn of the century, often issued large numbers of tokens over many years. For example, Emmerson Shephard, who commenced trading in 1909 in Gateshead with a small shoe shop, which within a few years was developed into a major department store, issued a long series which lasted into decimalisation. Shepherd's tokens are found in copper, brass, white metal, aluminium, plastic and compressed fibre. Other department stores in the North East who issued substantial numbers over long periods were J. T. Parish (Newcastle), Hedley Young & Co (Blyth), Hedley Swan & Co (Sunderland), and Liverpool House (Sunderland).

In 1876, J. A. Game founded the London & Newcastle Tea Co., a firm of grocers and tea dealers….
……Retail shops in England were confined to the northern counties of Northumberland and Durham, but many branches existed in Scotland, Wales and Ireland. Tokens issued by the company were valued in quantities of tea: 2oz, ¼lb, ½lb, and 1lb. They are mostly dated 1876, some later, and many are signed J. A. Game. These pieces are interesting for several reasons. It is unusual to find tokens signed by the issuer, and if not unique, it is rare to find them dated. Also of interest is the fact that the majority carry the branch address in full, rather than just the name of the town. Many specimens will also be found with a countermarked number or letter. The company also produced a uniface generic issue that was provided to new branches as a stopgap for immediate use until the branch could obtain their own requirements. It is believed that the firm abandoned the use of tokens around 1900……
Malcolm
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Penny, J. T. Parrish, Newcastle-on-Tyne
« Reply #7 on: July 18, 2012, 09:56:48 AM »
That was a long type, Malcolm, but eminently worth it. Thank you. As for the date range, I presume copper came first, zinc later, presumably dring the first world war.

The use for installment sales explains the shilling denomination as well as why the dept stores - carrying more expensive goods - liked them. There must be more higher values than casual collectors are aware of, but there probably was a higher propensity to use them than the pennies and halfpennies. I am now also wondering whether the zinc issues were thought of as temporary. If they look the same as the copper issue, it may make sense to cancel the zincs on redemption, to prevent re-issue, but it still looks like a lot of trouble.

While it is speculation, the idea of the tokens may have come from the cooperative society shops, that predated the installment tokens by a decade or two. The coop society tokens function was to serve coop members with discounts or dividend, but their effect was of course to bind clients to certain shops. Other shops must have noticed that effect and used it to their advantage. It is exactly this sort of commercial flexibility and ability to learn from the competition that the coop societies did not have and caused their eventual downfall.

Peter
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Offline malj1

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Re: Penny, J. T. Parrish, Newcastle-on-Tyne
« Reply #8 on: July 18, 2012, 01:06:22 PM »
That was a long type, Malcolm, but eminently worth it. Thank you....
Peter

I cheated  :) I have a very good OCR reader!

The first part of that quote,  ... with the establishment of "Mutuality Clubs"... had been referring to the co-op checks, I should have made that clearer - so you speculated correctly!

I can add the 2/- token. Aluminium 29mm.
« Last Edit: July 18, 2012, 01:20:48 PM by malj1 »
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Offline <k>

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Re: Penny, J. T. Parrish, Newcastle-on-Tyne
« Reply #9 on: July 18, 2012, 01:20:29 PM »
Apparently J T Parrish closed in 1984. I have dim memories of it from the 1960s. It had this Heath Robinson contraption, whereby the assistant would place an old-fashioned receipt or whatever (much larger than they are nowadays) into a metal canister, put a lid on it,  then place the canister beneath an overhead system of tubes. The canister would be sucked into the opening in the tube and be whisked off to another department. Fascinating stuff for a young boy to watch.

Offline malj1

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Re: Penny, J. T. Parrish, Newcastle-on-Tyne
« Reply #10 on: July 18, 2012, 01:47:28 PM »
The telegraph office I worked at back in 1957 still had one of these installed - an overhead wire system - in Australia we call them flying foxes. Picture of the receiving end below. btw the lady is a dummy!

There were also pneumatic tubes to send similar containers to different departments on other floors and even to offices several blocks away. Parish's could well have had something like this installed.

Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Offline Dave13

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Re: Penny, J. T. Parrish, Newcastle-on-Tyne
« Reply #11 on: July 18, 2012, 02:47:31 PM »
After another look around on the internet I discovered that J.T. Parrish Department store actually opened in 1921 before that it was a drapers. I'm adding my other tokens to this post so we can have a virtual collection of all the tokens for this shop. the 1/2d is brass and the 1d is copper.
« Last Edit: July 18, 2012, 03:20:49 PM by Dave13 »
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Offline malj1

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Re: Penny, J. T. Parrish, Newcastle-on-Tyne
« Reply #12 on: July 19, 2012, 09:26:53 AM »
J T Parrish, draper, is listed from the mid-1880s, and this grew into the major store which opened in 1921.

Here is the 1984 report of the closure.



The slogan for Shields Road was "come east, pay least" in stores such as Beavan's, Pledger's and Parrish's, whose tokens were widely used in the area and could be exchanged for cash in local shops.

Another interesting snippet....
Another way of getting cash was to sell the tokens that Parrish’s issued
when you purchased items from their shop. “If you paid by cheque
in Parrish’s you got change in tokens, so could then take the
tokens and exchange for cash in local shops (maybe 15s in the £),
thereby getting instant cash but still having to honour the cheque
at some point in the future”. Parrish’s tokens are legendary in
east Newcastle. Like Ringtons’ tea caddies and Maling pottery, they
are part of the cultural heritage of the area.
« Last Edit: November 11, 2015, 11:42:41 AM by Niels »
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Penny, J. T. Parrish, Newcastle-on-Tyne
« Reply #13 on: July 19, 2012, 10:23:56 AM »
That is indeed the building now marked as Parrish Court, near number 188.

Peter
« Last Edit: July 06, 2017, 10:42:04 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline redwine

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Re: Penny, J. T. Parrish, Newcastle-on-Tyne
« Reply #14 on: September 20, 2013, 01:34:17 PM »
O: J. T. PARRISH / Ltd / NEWCASTLE / ON-TYNE
R:£1

Decagonal One Pound
Brass
Weight: 7.2g
Diameter:32mm
Medal aligned
10 sided
« Last Edit: September 20, 2013, 01:47:36 PM by redwine »
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