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Author Topic: Comments on “Thematic sets from the 1920s to date”  (Read 11358 times)

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Offline <k>

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Offline <k>

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Re: Comments on “Thematic sets from the 1920s to date”
« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2012, 10:15:37 PM »
Before the First World War, when monarchies and empires were the rule, heraldry, coats of arms and royal emblems were far more likely to be seen on coins than anything else. However, since the 1920s the use of themes (flora, fauna, ships, architecture, etc.) on coins has increased enormously.

I want to make a list of these thematic sets by year. I can’t do this all by myself, so I would like the members to point out any I have missed. I will be open-minded up to a point, but I will be the final arbiter of what I include. Here are some of the guidelines I will be following:

1] By thematic, I mean a design with a representational theme: flora, fauna, ships, national heroes, etc.  Heraldic, symbolic and abstract themes, and coat of arms, do not count.

2] To be included, a set must have circulated. In some cases this will be difficult to determine.

3] I will include no sets from Andorra (pre-2014), Monaco, Liechtenstein, San Marino or Vatican City. I regard these all as being of dubious numismatic value.

4] A set must include at least three coins with a thematic design, and these must also comprise at least 50% of the coins in the set.

5] A set must be stable, complete and permanent in any one year, and not on-going.

6] I will exclude sets where I judge the physical coins to be poorly made or the designs to be poor, trivial, or only borderline thematic.
 
7] I will not necessarily show designs that have been subsequently added to a series when new denominations have been released. It would take too long to include them all.

8] I will not necessarily show designs after the original coin format (e.g. size, shape, metal content, denomination, legend) or the accompanying obverse design has been changed. That would be too time-consuming.

9] I will illustrate at least one design per set but will list all the thematic descriptions. I will include designer names where known.

These are guidelines only, not rules. I want to avoid long discussions about technicalities and keep it good-natured and fun.

« Last Edit: November 26, 2014, 04:43:23 PM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: Comments on “Thematic sets from the 1920s to date”
« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2012, 10:16:01 PM »
I will expand on some of these points.

Point 1] - for some people, heraldry (for example) would be a theme. However, I am restricting the topic to modern representational themes. This also excludes sets such as Armenia, which uses geometric patterns on its current circulation coins.

Point 4] disqualifies the UK 1937 set: it has (arguably) 3 thematic designs (ship, bird, plant), but the majority of the designs are heraldic. By the same token, very few sets are entirely thematic, as often one coin shows the coat of arms or the head of state.

Point 4] also disqualifies e.g. Peru of the 1960s, which has only two denominations using the same vicuña design.

Point 5] - the Bahamas has an on-going policy of modernising its standard designs: in recent years, the 1 cent and 10 cent coins have been updated, with new designs on the same theme (starfish and bonefish respectively). I will not include these designs until the new design series has been completed.

Point 5] again - we have an inconclusive situation in the USA, where in recent years some standard denominations have had fixed designs, whilst others have had their design changed most years.

Point 5] also disqualifies one-off UK commemorative circulating issues (50p, £1, £2 coins) that circulate alongside longstanding standard circulation designs.
« Last Edit: July 01, 2012, 02:17:21 AM by <k> »

Offline Prosit

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Re: Comments on “Thematic sets from the 1920s to date”
« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2012, 10:25:25 PM »
Point 6 would seem to exclude the Austrian 2-Schillings since they occured over a 10 year period..  So to be clear you are talking about thematic year sets?
Dale

Offline <k>

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Re: Comments on “Thematic sets from the 1920s to date”
« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2012, 10:28:08 PM »
Point 6 would seem to exclude the Austrian 2-Schillings since they occured over a 10 year period..  So to be clear you are talking about thematic year sets?
Dale

Roughly. It's not an exact science. I want to capture the first year when a set becomes a fully-fledged thematic set, according to my guidelines: at least half of its coins, and not less than 3 in any case, must carry a thematic design.
« Last Edit: July 01, 2012, 02:17:51 AM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: Comments on “Thematic sets from the 1920s to date”
« Reply #5 on: June 19, 2012, 11:16:28 PM »
The Mauritius set of 1934 contains a single thematic design: a red deer on the half rupee, designed by George Kruger-Gray. This seems like a lost opportunity, but the British at the time had the idea that each theme must be unique to a country or territory. If, for instance, a turtle had been used on one country's coins, another turtle must not be depicted on another country's coins. These days we find several countries depicting, say, rhinos and elephants, but nobody thinks that is a problem.

Offline <k>

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Re: Comments on “Thematic sets from the 1920s to date”
« Reply #6 on: June 19, 2012, 11:42:33 PM »
With the Australian pre-decimal set, I don't regard the wheat ears on the threepence as a thematic design, so that leaves me with the kangaroos and the ram. You could say they comprise just two designs, since the same kangaroo faces different ways; however, I regard that as borderline and not conclusive.

It pains me to think of the set that might have been:

Australia: Rejected pre-decimal designs of 1937/8



 




Offline chrisild

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Re: Comments on “Thematic sets from the 1920s to date”
« Reply #7 on: June 20, 2012, 11:01:20 PM »
While the guidelines are fairly complex, I do enjoy the images and your comments. :) One side note: You wrote that “BELGISCH” was unfortunately misspelt as “BELGISH”. Well, that coin was minted in Philadelphia (US) ... maybe they were in a hurry (this was a WW2 issue) but it sure is a funny error.

Christian

Offline <k>

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Re: Comments on “Thematic sets from the 1920s to date”
« Reply #8 on: June 20, 2012, 11:13:13 PM »
While the guidelines are fairly complex, I do enjoy the images and your comments. :) One side note: You wrote that “BELGISCH” was unfortunately misspelt as “BELGISH”. Well, that coin was minted in Philadelphia (US) ... maybe they were in a hurry (this was a WW2 issue) but it sure is a funny error.

Christian

Yes, you would certainly have expected an Inglisch speaker to have misspelt it. Well, Anglophones misspell their own language plenty, because there are very few "rules".

As for my guidelines being complex, well, we coin collectors are a bit Asperger's and love to analyse and categorise. Actually, there aren't TOO many guidelines. Some are just me saying how much I'll display of a set, or that I'll only display the original design (not all the reduced sizes and different metals and dies with a dot and without a dot). It forestalls some of the comments and questions I'd otherwise get.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Comments on “Thematic sets from the 1920s to date”
« Reply #9 on: June 21, 2012, 12:33:47 PM »
Makes sense, yes - after all, those "guidelines" primarily explain what coins/sets you will include, what will not be in here and why. I am looking forward to seeing more of your examples ... and can still bicker later, in case I believe that this or that should be added or left out. :)

Christian

Offline <k>

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Re: Comments on “Thematic sets from the 1920s to date”
« Reply #10 on: June 21, 2012, 12:51:00 PM »
Glad you like it, Christian! More coming very soon - and I have some in the wrong order, so I will correct that.
« Last Edit: July 01, 2017, 02:17:46 AM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: Comments on “Thematic sets from the 1920s to date”
« Reply #11 on: June 21, 2012, 01:17:18 PM »
I did briefly consider showcasing 3 Romanian coins from the 1960s that show industrial scenes. However, all the other denominations show just the face value, so unfortunately they don't cohere as a set. You can see them by clicking on the link below:

Socialism on coins



I also briefly considered including the Sierra Leone 1964 set but decided that some of the designs were too stylised to be regarded as thematic.

Well, 1966 proved to be an interesting year for new releases. At the time I was still a child, though I did have a few coins. I can remember wondering who that man* was with the fez on my hexagonal coin, and why the initials PM* (which happen to be my own too) appeared on that coin and on the Irish barnyard set too. (* answers: King Farouk, and the initials belonged to the designer, Percy Metcalfe).

Offline <k>

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Re: Comments on “Thematic sets from the 1920s to date”
« Reply #12 on: June 21, 2012, 01:23:28 PM »
You may notice that I have changed one of my original guidelines. I now include sets where there is only one thematic design, which is used by at least three coins. Sometimes the same design appears on all the coins - Qatar and Dubai is an example. I think there are quite a few examples of this also in former French Africa. If so, I have omitted some important sets, so I will look at French Africa later and then insert those sets in the correct year.

I am even thinking of splitting out all those sets with a single thematic design and displaying them in a related topic, also by year, since there must be quite a few such sets. If I look at the Qatar set, which shows a single design of a ship, I think I should include it, as the ship is very nicely designed. However, that ship is also the state symbol - should I exclude the set for that reason? Hard to decide. And Kuwait also has a set with a nice design of ships. If I exclude one, probably I should exclude the other.

Offline <k>

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Re: Comments on “Thematic sets from the 1920s to date”
« Reply #13 on: June 21, 2012, 03:49:50 PM »
Thinking of the original Mauritius set of the 1930s, where only the deer design could be considered a thematic design, I wonder if there are any other sets with that curious structure - having only a single thematic design and coin?

My other thought is how many sets exist where all the coins bear a single thematic design, such as the Qatar and Dubai set of 1966.

Offline <k>

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Re: Comments on “Thematic sets from the 1920s to date”
« Reply #14 on: June 21, 2012, 05:26:32 PM »
Brazil had a couple of short FAO sets, one around 1975 (3 coins), and another around 1979/80.  I consider them too trivial to include in the topic.

Some sets almost look like sets, but they are too messy and incoherent. Austria's pre-euro set was a mess, as is Madagascar's set (sets?) since the 1970s. Germany's pre-euro set, though not thematic, looked like it was made up from three different sets, but Christian will disagree.

Then there are those sets that are almost perfect, but which have one or two dissonant components. I love Singapore's first set, the marine series (seahorse, etc.). But then they go and include the squinte (merlion) among the real animals! OK, so it could be regarded as the country's national symbol, and therefore similar to a coat of arms on the top denomination of any other country. Fair enough. But look at the design on the 1 cent coin: a fountain in front of a flat block! Who on Earth thought that would fit in with the rest of the set? Surely somebody could have thought of another sea creature? Even a plant or flower would have been better than a block of flats!  ::)

 
« Last Edit: February 12, 2016, 01:31:23 PM by <k> »