Multiple shields / coats of arms

Started by <k>, April 26, 2012, 12:49:20 PM

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<k>

Multiple shields or coats of arms are usually only found on collector coins. The Ibero-American series coins often portray them.

Ecuador, 5000 Sucres, 1991.




See also:

Designs showing multiple figures around the inner/outer circle
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<k>

#1
The standard Jersey circulation two pound coin shows the crests of the Bailwick's 12 parishes.
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Figleaf

#2
Joint shields were used to denote multiple feudal possessions. Here is a very scarce Cromwellian coin with the arms of England and Ireland. Guess why they were called breeches...

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

bagerap

#3
Silver medal commemorating twinning of Tubingen with Durham

<k>

#4







These coins of Belgium all have different shields. Does anybody know what they are and what they represent?

The 5 and 25 centimes are dated 1938; the 10 centimes is dated 1939.



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<k>

#5
Belgium, 1 and 5 francs, 1939.








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<k>

#6


Belgium, 50 francs, 1939.
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<k>

#7
40th anniversary of the Federal Republic of Germany, 1989, 10 DM.
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<k>

#8
40th anniversary of the German Democratic Republic, 1989, 10 Mark.
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<k>

#9
German Democratic Republic, 1975, 10 Mark. 20th anniversary of the Warsaw Pact.
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<k>



Spain, 50 centimos, 1949.  The yoke and arrows on the reverse (left-hand image) formed the emblem of General Franco's Falangist Movement.
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chrisild

Quote from: coffeetime on April 28, 2012, 09:26:18 PM
40th anniversary of the German Democratic Republic, 1989, 10 Mark.

That one I find interesting because it shows the shields of Berlin (East) and the 14 GDR districts "geographically". See this map for example: http://de.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Datei:DDR_Verwaltungsbezirke_farbig.svg

What is also peculiar in my opinion that the text on the other side is the first words of the national anthem ... an anthem that, between 1970 and 1990, was not sung (ie. just the music was played) as the text referred to German unity.

Christian

<k>

#12
Argentina, 2000 pesos, 1978.  World Soccer Championship.
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<k>

#13
Greenland, 1 krone, 1957. The two shields represent Denmark and Greenland.
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<k>

#14
Uruguay, 5000 pesos (gold), 1981.  Hydroelectric dam.  Shields of Uruguay and Argentina.
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