Author Topic: Nauru: My oddest-shaped coin  (Read 7862 times)

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Offline a3v1

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Nauru: My oddest-shaped coin
« on: March 30, 2008, 04:51:37 PM »
This Nauru 10 Dollars I acquired several years ago.
Regards,
a3v1
Over half a century of experience as a coin collector.
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Money is like body fat: If there's too much of it, it always is in the wrong places.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Nauru: My oddest-shaped coin
« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2008, 07:52:18 PM »
Cute idea but the map is odd of course. In order to have one piece of metal, the producers had to include the UK and parts of the Balkans, none of which have anything to do with the European currency. Then again, Finland was left out, probably because the "land bridge" would not have been very stable, hehe. Still a fun piece ...

Christian

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Nauru: My oddest-shaped coin
« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2008, 09:05:44 PM »
Nauru is my favorite country. It consists mainly of bird ... uhhh ... droppings, politely called phosphate. Its mining (shovelling) left considerable holes in the ground. Now they have a concentration camp for Australia's illegal aliens there. Droppings from steel birds...

Nauru is one of the smallest (20 km2), least populated (less than 10 000 people)  countries in the world, so it doesn't need and doesn't have a capital. The national airline has one aircraft. The hapless airline is known for cancelling flights when a Nauru fisherman is missing, so relatives can climb on board and sip free drinks while the plane runs around in circles. :)

My kind of place. Oh, well, back to coins.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

translateltd

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Re: Nauru: My oddest-shaped coin
« Reply #3 on: March 31, 2008, 05:24:54 AM »
Nauru is in the ... phosphate now that the new Australian government has closed down the detention camps, though - the country has little left to survive on now that it's exported most of itself and much of the revenue has been squandered.


Offline a3v1

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Re: Nauru: My oddest-shaped coin
« Reply #4 on: March 31, 2008, 10:44:00 AM »
The above "coin" has a weight of 31.25 grammes; 999.9 pure silver (just over a troy ounce). The image of the Eurocoin is gilded in part.
As an avid collector of Eurocoins I thougt it fun to buy this piece, and it was really cheap at the time.
Its weight doesn't qualify it as a proper paperweight, alas! ;D
Regards,
a3v1
Over half a century of experience as a coin collector.
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Money is like body fat: If there's too much of it, it always is in the wrong places.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Nauru: My oddest-shaped coin
« Reply #5 on: March 31, 2008, 11:03:28 AM »
I understand your reaction completely. I might have fallen for this crazy piece, because I am a frequent user of the Euro tunnel, which it displays so prominently :) I am reminded of the Bermuda triangle piece I was able to get my clammy hands on with the help of translateltd. Collecting fun numismatic fringe stuff is actually what I like best. Some don't scan as well as your piece, though. Otherwise, I would have shown my Chinese coin paperweight or my Texas illegal drugs tax receipt here. :D

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

BC Numismatics

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Re: Nauru: My oddest-shaped coin
« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2008, 08:47:08 AM »
This Nauru 10 Dollars I acquired several years ago.
Regards,
a3v1

A3v1,
  That is a very nice Nauruan $10 medal-coin that you have got there.All Nauruan medal-coins are Proof only issues.The actual currency in circulation on Nauru is the Australian Dollar.

Nauru is the only British Commonwealth member state that does not have a permanent capital city in the strict sense of the word.Nauru is the only country outside Australia that allows its citizens to take an appeal to the High Court of Australia.

Here's some details about the Nauruan head of state; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/President_of_Nauru .

That particular Nauruan medal-coin is listed in Krause.

Aidan.

Offline thelawnet

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Re: Nauru: My oddest-shaped coin
« Reply #7 on: February 20, 2009, 10:55:30 PM »
There are a lot of ridiculous 'coins' around:

Niue: $1.



Cook Islands $5


Vanuatu fish 'coins' '50 vatu':


Palau '1 dollar'



'$5'


Palau '$1' with holy water from Lourdes (also in $5)


Nauru pop up Pope $10:



Palau $5 with embedded pearl:


Offline Figleaf

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Re: Nauru: My oddest-shaped coin
« Reply #8 on: February 21, 2009, 01:51:32 AM »
What an amazing collection. I can't decide which one is the most hideous. You have to admire the ingenuity that goes into thinking of this outlandishness. I just wish they'd put it to use on a more worthy cause. Now they'll want the naive to believe that these are coins.

The very biggest lies have a fascination of their own. I am instantly reminded of the conscienceless political marketeers who successfully sold us Hitler as rejuvenating, Mussolini as heroic, Biafra as famine country, Yeltsin as sober, Chirac as an Americanophile, Bush as a reconciler (not comparing anyone with anyone else here)...

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline thelawnet

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Re: Nauru: My oddest-shaped coin
« Reply #9 on: February 21, 2009, 02:30:37 AM »
What an amazing collection. I can't decide which one is the most hideous.

The Lautrec coin would make quite an interesting silver bullion bar if it was enlarged. The fish are hardly recognisable as coins and not offensive as fish. The gold 1 dollar heart is muted enough, I think the cherub and the devil heart is the most offensive of those two. I've always found mass-produced religious artifacts to be particularly tacky, so it's a toss-up between the pop-up Pope and the Lourdes holy water. The phrase 'Popup Pope' (which is not what they marked it as) amuses me, so I think it has to be the holy water, especially given that Lourdes is inherently tacky.

Other tacky coins:

'Somalia' $1 2004:



This one is particularly unfortunate:




It is Gary Glitter's guitar! He of course had been imprisoned in the UK for child pornography offenses, and deported from Cambodia in 2002 for child sex abuse, so it was an odd choice.

This 5000 Kwacha Zambia joins the maps of Zambia and er Australia, in honour of the 2000 Olympics:



Zambia have earned a grand total of 1 silver and 1 bronze medal in 11 Olympic games.

These are more 'Somalia' coins, in the shape of motorbikes:



This 2005 Nieu $1 'coin' to commemorate Edison's invention of the lightbulb features a working light bulb LED:



This Palau $5 has an embedded 4-leaf clover:



This Palau volcano coin contains some authentic Palau volcanic rock:



While this $5 features some Chinese meteorite:



This Liberia $5 John F Kennedy commemorative reads his 'Ich bin ein Berliner' speech when you press it:



This Liberia $10 contains some coal from the Titanic:



This Liberia coin is an interesting concept. 1 KG of .999 silver, it consists of a $40 silver coin with 12 puzzle piece $5 coins that fit around it. But because that seemed like an interesting concept, and it simply wasn't tacky enough, they made the 12 coins the Apostles, and the central coin Jesus.



The Isle of Man 'Pyramid' coin was launched with much fanfare, but sadly is not a pyramid at all, merely triangular, and as such is not innovative as such coins have been around for at least a century:



This Palau $1 coin contains a piece of a poker card from Las Vegas:



It actually has the words 'Dealer Button' on it, just in case the buyer/recipient is actually foolish enough to believe that they should visiti Palau and spend it. Clearly there's money to be made by turning normal objects into 'coins'.

Are there any other objects which could similarly be turned into 'coins'?

Perhaps a cigarette lighter coin?

Or maybe they could make a music or data CD with the denomination on one side and the data on the other.
« Last Edit: December 28, 2015, 11:39:00 PM by Niels »

Offline chrisild

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Re: Nauru: My oddest-shaped coin
« Reply #10 on: February 21, 2009, 08:54:55 AM »
Now if Space Oddity is what you what ... Australia's Perth Mint comes to the rescue. Voilą, the Orbit series ...



... "from" the Cook Islands.

Christian
« Last Edit: February 21, 2009, 08:57:55 AM by chrisild »

Offline chrisild

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Re: Nauru: My oddest-shaped coin
« Reply #11 on: February 21, 2009, 09:03:25 AM »
And, still round, but with diamonds (left), opals (center), or sapphires (right). Not oddly shaped, just odd. ;)



Those come in either gold or silver. Perth Mint again, this time in the name of Australia.

Christian