Author Topic: UK local transportation tokens  (Read 88675 times)

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Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #195 on: November 28, 2013, 04:37:21 PM »
Nottingham, known in dee times for its oval tokens, mysteriously started using a pentagon (US military) and a hexagon (France) in pee times (note the word "new" in the denomination.) There must be a sublimal message somewhere… :)

The mystery deepens by a circle (1 p white) and a square (4 p blue)

Peter
« Last Edit: April 13, 2014, 10:20:39 AM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #196 on: November 28, 2013, 05:16:08 PM »
Here are the only tokens from Oxfordshire, which is where the UK hides half of its best rowers. ;) Note the different fonts used for the denomination.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #197 on: November 28, 2013, 05:46:30 PM »
Evidence that plastic bus tokens are still with us: a Portsmouth pound with an expiry date in 2013! Too recent to be listed in Voice.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #198 on: November 28, 2013, 09:57:29 PM »
Remarkably, the p-tokens of Plymouth still have the old arms

Added penny bronze colour and penny brass colour with different font.

Peter
« Last Edit: July 17, 2014, 12:28:18 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #199 on: November 28, 2013, 11:46:51 PM »
These are the arms of the county borough. New arms were granted in 1983. See this thread. I like the ice-cream colours. :)

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #200 on: November 30, 2013, 01:00:04 PM »
Ryedale's (North Yorkshire) contribution to this series. The fine, clear script appeals to me.

20 p sea green added.

Peter
« Last Edit: April 13, 2014, 12:43:09 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #201 on: November 30, 2013, 06:25:37 PM »
Interesting token from Staffordshire. It looks like the two halves of the mode shifted slightly. Note how, if you hold the token correctly, the cut out E is in the correct position on both sides.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #202 on: November 30, 2013, 06:48:19 PM »
Stroud hadn't played its last card with this token. It crept up on a national transportation token you can see here.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #203 on: November 30, 2013, 08:00:23 PM »
Thamesdown is both a borough (Swindon and surrounding area) and a bus company. The green of this token is part of the livery of the busses.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Kushi

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #204 on: November 30, 2013, 09:01:12 PM »
No LIKE available button here, but a big thanks and BRAVO for all the photos and information about the many recent plastic tokens from all sorts of British local authorities. Keep them coming. Terrific.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #205 on: November 30, 2013, 10:28:34 PM »
Thank you, Kushi. I am just your humble administrator, but I have fantastic friends all over the globe who help me.

Maybe you'll find the index handy. It needs more work, which I shall do in due time, but, together with the pictures, I think it allows further research.

For one thing, there is a pattern evolving where the late d-tokens were put together with generic reverses and what may have been a city seal. This means, that a patient type can sort out those generic reverses and maybe connect them to a token producer and maybe even a time period. Another point is the diameter, sometimes clearly non-decimal (22 mm = 7/8 inch and 25 mm = 1 inch), sometimes decimal (e.g. 20 mm). My guess is that they point at different machinery, made in Britain or elsewhere.

Mapping the places of issue might be useful as well. My working hypothesis is that you'll most often find them in big cities, industrial and mining centres and small ports: all having pockets of deep poverty. That again makes it strange that there are few or no bus tokens from Scotland (except Edinburgh and Glasgow), Northern Ireland (except Belfast) and Wales.

Another area that needs more work is the colours. It's relatively hard to read these tokens, especially in lamp light. They must have been difficult to check. Yet, there are surprising numbers of fixed colour/size/denomination combinations, such as 1 d, 22 mm, red. It looks like an open invitation to cheat…

I am hoping that one day someone will be inspired by this thread to dig into such issues and come up with answers and numbers.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #206 on: November 30, 2013, 11:46:11 PM »
Warrington is on the river Mersey, not far from Liverpool and Manchester. The tokens have the pre-1974 arms.

5 p and 10 p added.

Peter
« Last Edit: July 17, 2014, 08:03:12 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #207 on: December 01, 2013, 12:06:28 AM »
It's nice when they are dated. Every year a new colour, I suppose. See also this post.

Added a 50p blue (2007) and orange (2008)

Peter
« Last Edit: July 17, 2014, 02:39:57 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #208 on: December 01, 2013, 12:20:05 AM »
Yorkshire Woollen District, presumably in its final iteration. You have to love the baby colours. :)

Penny brown added.

Peter
« Last Edit: April 17, 2014, 05:49:26 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline FosseWay

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #209 on: December 01, 2013, 09:03:33 AM »
Warrington is on the river Mersey, not far from Liverpool and Manchester. The tokens have the pre-1974 arms.

Peter

And they clearly can't speak English there, either. "One new pence", indeed...  ::)