Author Topic: UK local transportation tokens  (Read 89370 times)

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Online Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #180 on: November 18, 2013, 11:27:42 AM »
Blackburn turned into Blackburn with Darwen in 1974, but the arms remained the same. The denomination and the heraldry are arguments for a date before the merger, so we can tentatively decide on 1968-1974.

Peter
« Last Edit: November 18, 2013, 11:53:20 AM by Figleaf »
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Online Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #181 on: November 18, 2013, 11:57:10 AM »
Cannock Chase is a district about halfway between Stoke-on-Trent and Birmingham. The C on the purple token is not a cancellation but part of the design.

Peter
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Online Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #182 on: November 18, 2013, 12:14:42 PM »
A clear continuation of the pre-decimal tokens. Inflation would hit hard.

Peter

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Online Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #183 on: November 18, 2013, 12:31:37 PM »
A confused token. Voice lists it under Cotswold, which is one of the nicest places in England to visit as long as it doesn't rain. However, the C cutout is an indication that it should really be listed under Gloucestershire. When the C is in the correct position, the Gloucestershire side is up. Moreover, Cotswold is part of Gloucestershire. If the token were valid only in Cotswold, some passengers would want to use it elsewhere in Gloucestershire, to the chagrin of bus drivers :o

Peter

10 pence red  and 20 pence green added.
« Last Edit: April 11, 2014, 08:20:10 PM by Figleaf »
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Offline FosseWay

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #184 on: November 18, 2013, 12:37:57 PM »
Cotswold isn't in itself an administrative division. The area generally known as the Cotswolds includes parts of the counties of Gloucestershire, Somerset, Wiltshire, Worcestershire and Warwickshire. Some of those (certainly Gloucestershire) have sub-authorities that include the word "Cotswold" in their title.

Offline malj1

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #185 on: November 18, 2013, 12:55:51 PM »
I would imagine the 'C' on this and the earlier listed Cannock Chase token would represent 'Concessionary'.

Search for Cotswold District Council on Google says: Cotswold is a local government district in Gloucestershire in England. It is named after the wider Cotswolds region. Its main town is Cirencester.
« Last Edit: November 18, 2013, 01:05:59 PM by malj1 »
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Online Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #186 on: November 18, 2013, 02:16:02 PM »
Derby, of brass token fame, finally ran out of ammunition casing and went for plastic. O.A.P. means old age pensioner. Only a civil servant can think of a term that contains two thirds redundancy. ::)

Added two much bigger (29 mm) tokens: 3 p with the OAP reverse and 10 p with blank reverse

Peter
« Last Edit: November 18, 2013, 03:18:28 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Online Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #187 on: November 18, 2013, 03:33:36 PM »
North Dorset is in the South of England, North of Bournemouth, as UK Decimal + would know. :P This may have been the most horrid colour available to the district council :)

Peter
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Online Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #188 on: November 18, 2013, 04:15:10 PM »
Eastleigh is curled around Southampton. Geographical names defy the compass in this part of the world. :)

Peter
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Online Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #189 on: November 18, 2013, 04:44:20 PM »
Northavon was a district in the county of Avon from 1974 to 1996.

Peter
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Online Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #190 on: November 18, 2013, 09:54:34 PM »
After decimalization, Edinburgh continued its bus token programme while it still could. The obverse is the same as the one shown here.

Peter

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Online Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #191 on: November 18, 2013, 10:14:14 PM »
Glasgow, a social disaster area at this time, maintained its bus token programme.

Added two specimen of the green penny. Lighter token is slightly larger, it has a more pronounced edge rim and the arms are slightly smaller (compare the distance between the first T of TRANSPORT and the arms). What I find interesting is the field, which is completely smooth on the darker token and rough on the lighter one. I suspect that they were made with different production techniques.

Peter

« Last Edit: April 11, 2014, 07:35:24 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Online Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #192 on: November 18, 2013, 10:28:26 PM »
Grimsby-Cleethorpes. Another place that carried on after decimalization…

Peter
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Online Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #193 on: November 18, 2013, 11:06:04 PM »
NO, UDC is not UK Decimal Coin, but Urban District Council. The Urban Districts were wiped out in 1974 by the local government act. Hornsea is a village near Hull, on the British East coast.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline malj1

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #194 on: November 20, 2013, 12:08:57 PM »
What is the W.S.T.? I suppose the W. and T. are West Thorpe, but what is the S.?

The Smiths (1990) have this listed as England 685 BW.

Westthorpe is just one word which makes a little more sense of the WST.

Now the mine is closed and the area has become Westthorpe Hills. This countryside site where Westthorpe Colliery used to be is now transformed and is a great place for both people and wildlife. More here .
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.