Author Topic: UK local transportation tokens  (Read 88804 times)

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Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #165 on: November 15, 2013, 04:44:20 PM »
The Plymouth arms were redesigned some time after 1925. The tokens show the old arms. There are two arms sizes. On the red token, the tail of the right lion aligns with TI. On the white token, it aligns with AT. The denomination side comes in several versions. The 2 penny token is slightly smaller and thinner than the others. It looks like another production process was used.

Added an TI aligned 5 pence baby blue.
Added three versions of the 1 d red, a black penny with a broad, outlined 1 and a tuppence brown. All are TI aligned.

Peter
« Last Edit: September 07, 2014, 05:46:47 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #166 on: November 15, 2013, 05:32:57 PM »
Preston took the central elements of its coat of arms as main device for its bus tokens. PP is said to mean Princeps Pacis (prince of peace). My first thought was Prestonis Patronas (patron saint of Preston). The Lamb is the device of St. Wilfrid who is the Patron Saint of Preston.

Added a dark blue one stage token. The text is different;y aligned. The quickest way to distinguish the two alignments is by the E in ONE. On the blue token it is left of the G underneath. On the black token it is to the right of the G.

Peter
« Last Edit: September 07, 2014, 06:04:03 PM by Figleaf »
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #167 on: November 15, 2013, 08:13:08 PM »
Rochdale was once a textile economy (hence the wool sack on the arms,) but it has become a commuting town in greater Manchester. I have a second black token with what on a coin would be called 180 die rotation.

Peter
« Last Edit: November 15, 2013, 11:31:21 PM by Figleaf »
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Offline malj1

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #168 on: November 15, 2013, 11:13:41 PM »
There is a post for Nottingham tokens already, but this one is good enough for its own post. This token is marked A.R.P. which means that it was meant for air raid precautions wardens. Nottingham, unlike Walmington, is not by the sea, but I can still see warden Hodges use this, managing to make it a token of the extraordinary power invested in him :)

Peter

I distinctly remember showing my Nottingham Corporation ARP three-halfpenny here too, it seems to have dropped off. (see Wartime Nottingham) A nicer shade of blue this time - but otherwise the same.

For use during WW2 by Air Raid Wardens, but only when on duty. Other colours are known Orange, Light green and Dark green; also an Orange 1d.

All these different issues leads one to speculate that they may also have been issued to the  Home Guard [Dads Army] too. Mainwaring would have had a hand in this!

« Last Edit: November 17, 2013, 12:33:28 PM by malj1 »
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #169 on: November 16, 2013, 12:03:50 AM »
Salford's arms have changed since this token came about, but it remains a confused hotchpotch. Today, it is a borough within greater Manchester.

Even in good light, black and white tokens all look alike. So why are there so many of them?

Peter
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Offline malj1

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #170 on: November 17, 2013, 08:58:02 AM »
From Sheffield we have the:

WALESWOOD COLLIERIES MOTOR BUS 2d red celluloid, 21.7mm another is known in Maroon, both are (R9) = 2 - 4 known.

A very nice image of the bus can be seen here.

Added bus tokens for the West Thorpe and Oxcroft mines, also near Sheffield. Both sides are the same.
« Last Edit: September 08, 2014, 05:25:35 PM by Figleaf »
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Offline Kushi

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #171 on: November 17, 2013, 01:56:17 PM »
What is the W.S.T.? I suppose the W. and T. are West Thorpe, but what is the S.?

The Smiths (1990) have this listed as England 685 BW.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #172 on: November 17, 2013, 02:26:51 PM »
Just quoting Voice. Booth & Fisher was a bus company, based in Eckington, specialised in transporting miners. Voice lists a number of Sheffield area mines served by them: High Moors (HM), Kiveton Park (KP), Oxcroft (OC), unknown (RPK), Waleswood (black on blue token) and West Thorpe (WST). They do not have a denomination.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Kushi

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #173 on: November 17, 2013, 02:45:34 PM »
Got it. I'm presuming this is West Thorpe.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #174 on: November 17, 2013, 03:01:43 PM »
South Shields is Newcastle's sea port, which explains the arms supporters (sailor, commerce) as well as the boat, that would typically be used to transport the crews of big ships. The anchor is still there, but the flags were replaced by a helmet some time after 1925. For the series with TRANSPORT, rather than TRAMWAYS, see this post.

Added a dark blue halfpenny. Colour lightened to increase visibility.
Added a yellow double penny and a light blue halfpenny. Variety or type?

Peter
« Last Edit: September 09, 2014, 04:45:21 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #175 on: November 17, 2013, 04:05:23 PM »
Surprisingly, the coat of arms used in the tokens of Sunderland is quite hard to find. I presume it was unofficial and not registered. I found it on the access gates of Mowbray Park: a sextant.

Peter
« Last Edit: September 09, 2014, 08:08:05 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline malj1

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #176 on: November 17, 2013, 10:17:09 PM »
, unknown (RPK),
Peter

RPK = Renishaw Park Colliery Line [from Smith and Smith]

Furnace Hill & Renishaw Park Collieries Ltd. Registered Office: 53, Norfolk Street, Sheffield

Here is a RENISHAW PARK COLLIERY BRASS MINERS CHECK from there. [not a transport item] from eBay.
« Last Edit: November 17, 2013, 10:30:12 PM by malj1 »
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Offline malj1

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #177 on: November 17, 2013, 10:42:10 PM »
Just quoting Voice. Booth & Fisher was a bus company, based in Eckington, specialised in transporting miners. Voice lists a number of Sheffield area mines served by them: High Moors (HM), Kiveton Park (KP), Oxcroft (OC), unknown (RPK), Waleswood (black on blue token) and West Thorpe (WST). They do not have a denomination.

Peter

See Booth & Fisher (Motor Services) Ltd. for a history of the company.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #178 on: November 17, 2013, 10:46:30 PM »
Thank you, Malcolm. My copy of Voice will be better than a new one :)

Here's another series to have fun with. The Yorkshire Traction Company (YTC). The colourful tokens are already a bit different: both sides are the same. However, the second series is mind boggling: not the colour, but the size differs with value.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #179 on: November 18, 2013, 10:53:05 AM »
Here come the tokens of Basingstoke and Deane. Each with an expiry date (to end contingent liabilities, I suppose). Cute detail: the square on the green variant, making sure you can't just paint an old token and recycle it. ;)

Pounds red (2005), salmon (2006) and orange (2010/11) added.
Pounds blue (2006/07), red (2007/08), purple (2008/09) and blue-green (2009/10) added.

Peter
« Last Edit: July 17, 2014, 11:42:53 AM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.