Author Topic: UK local transportation tokens  (Read 88472 times)

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Offline malj1

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #150 on: November 10, 2013, 11:23:13 AM »
I think I would call it a variety rather than a type.

I notice the Smith's refer to types, varieties and shades - with the latter two I wonder where one ends and the other begins?
Malcolm
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Offline andyg

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #151 on: November 10, 2013, 12:28:21 PM »
Taking London for example - types listed are;
1d -
light red
red
dark red
maroon

with no indication of how to tell them apart...
always willing to trade modern UK coins for modern coins from elsewhere....

Offline malj1

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #152 on: November 10, 2013, 01:12:05 PM »
That also applies to other entries in many other catalogues with descriptions such as "larger font' or 'smaller font' for instance.

See this image from a review of Machine tokens, referring to this....
Malcolm
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #153 on: November 10, 2013, 02:11:58 PM »
It gets to the point where you can create your own shade of colour with some bleach or by putting it out in the sun. ::)

Sure, it is difficult to get the same shade of plastic twice, unless you follow a precise recipe precisely (Lego does), but is that a variety? My approach is that the only thing that counts is a shade that is darker than normal and can be distinguished without having to compare it with normal shades side by side.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #154 on: November 12, 2013, 11:58:51 PM »
Barrow insists to add "in Furness", or its transportation company would have been known as Wheels of Barrow. Anyway, they think it looks hot. It seems like at one time the regular fee was threepence and postmen and employees paid half. Then, the fee doubled…

added: penny yellow employee, penny orange postman, 5 d yellow.
added: 2d black postman, 2d air force blue employee, 3d green value not outlined. Picture lightened considerably to show design on the black piece.

More tokens of Barrow-in-Furness here.

Peter
« Last Edit: July 18, 2014, 02:17:51 AM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #155 on: November 13, 2013, 02:05:55 AM »
A second post for Birmingham to add a highly interesting double thickness penny. Feels like a different material (celluloid?), looks like it consists of obverse and reverse halves, "welded" together.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline malj1

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #156 on: November 13, 2013, 02:29:24 AM »
A second post for Birmingham to add a highly interesting double thickness penny. Feels like a different material (celluloid?), looks like it consists of obverse and reverse halves, "welded" together.

Peter

This is listed as a separate type by Smith at 80AE.

He also lists a green penny and a dark green three-halfpence with the same remarks: (very thick)
Malcolm
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #157 on: November 13, 2013, 11:10:22 PM »
Chesterfield thought different. They decided to put the quite attractive central device of their coat of arms, a heraldic pomegranate tree, on their transport tokens. Heresy! Fortunately, they had second thoughts for a later series and did the usual arms/denomination thing. Just in time to be saved from the pillory, one hopes :)

Peter
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #158 on: November 14, 2013, 12:00:29 AM »
A slightly austere piece, but one of the older tramway tokens.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #159 on: November 14, 2013, 12:32:33 AM »
There are many differences, because of a different font size, dot size and placement of the legend. The best way to distinguish them if you have one copy is to look at the direction of the vertical bar of the E in EDINBURGH. On the left, it points at the centre of the ball on the 3. On the right, it points at the top of that ball.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #160 on: November 14, 2013, 10:08:28 PM »
A series of 25mm (1 inch) tokens from Leigh is here. The tokens in this post are 22.225 mm (7/8th inch). Leigh is 8 miles due West of the Manchester ring road. Fun detail: according to Google maps, there is no direct bus connection between Leigh and Manchester. You have to take a bus to Wigan first >:D

Fourpence green added.

Peter
« Last Edit: July 04, 2014, 03:55:17 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #161 on: November 14, 2013, 11:02:20 PM »
The common side of the London tokens is here. This post may partially overlap.

The lighter halfpenny has an incuse outlined denomination. The placement of the dots in the denomination is different on the two red pennies. There are other subtle differences also.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline malj1

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #162 on: November 15, 2013, 02:18:05 AM »
OLD BERT AND BILL / BUS SERVICE Brass, 22.7mm.

Bert and Bill were Bert Everard and Bill Potter who ran an early bus service in Carlisle using a small converted T-model Ford, both Londoners they had met in the army.

The tokens were used as tickets and were sold to passengers at the rate of seven to one shilling.

Information from an article in the TCS Bulletin Vol.5 No.9 of Sept. 1996.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #163 on: November 15, 2013, 01:12:25 PM »
Cutie! A story worthy of Disney. Not in Voice.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #164 on: November 15, 2013, 03:09:03 PM »
There is a post for Nottingham tokens already, but this one is good enough for its own post. This token is marked A.R.P. which means that it was meant for air raid precautions wardens. Nottingham, unlike Walmington, is not by the sea, but I can still see warden Hodges use this, managing to make it a token of the extraordinary power invested in him :)

Peter
« Last Edit: November 15, 2013, 11:18:29 PM by malj1 »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.