Author Topic: UK local transportation tokens  (Read 88798 times)

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Offline Kushi

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #90 on: December 30, 2012, 06:07:12 PM »
Many thanks for the photo and information. Marvelous.
« Last Edit: December 30, 2012, 10:45:46 PM by Kushi »

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #91 on: January 05, 2013, 01:39:52 PM »
Oldham is not a global scale metropolis, but you'd almost believe it from the bewildering varieties in their tramway tokens. The yellow penny (sounds like a Beatles song) is slightly over 22 mm, the baby pink halfpenny is a tad below 22 mm. Oldham is an agglomeration near Manchester. The owls in the arms are a pun (owldham), not a reflection of the wisdom of the textile workers wanting to use public transportation to Manchester with these tokens. The arms were changed (date not clear) since, replacing the rose by a third ring.

Four variations of the penny and three of the halfpenny added.

Peter
« Last Edit: November 15, 2013, 04:00:47 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #92 on: January 05, 2013, 03:02:29 PM »
Elsewhere, I posted tokens from Kingston-upon-Hull in decimal pence. This halfpenny is dark blue, but I lightened the image to show the arms with the three crowns. This token is 25 mm.

Added tuppence red. I found two varieties. I think they were made with different technologies. The differences that are the easiest to see are the place of the shield relative to the legend and the dot relative to the 2.

More varieties. Compare the size of the 2 and the placing of the dot on the three-halfpence and the penny

Added threepence grey and fourpence blue-green

Peter
« Last Edit: July 02, 2014, 08:58:32 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline andyg

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #93 on: January 13, 2013, 04:31:48 PM »
this isn't really about the tokens, but it is contemporary with their use...
Anyhow if it doesn't belong here it can be deleted again!

http://www.route-one.net/

RETROSPECTIVE: JIM HULME
WHEN FIDDLING WAS RIFE
In the fifth in his series of Life on the Buses articles based on his 50 years in the bus industiy, Jim
Hulme reazlls the days before electronic ticket machines put an end to some dubious practices.

I really can’t believe the scams that I came across during my years at Greater
Manchester PTE when it was still a bus operator. Although some attempts were farcical, others were nothing short of fraud.  The PTE discovered that drivers were able to get into the workings of the Almex ‘A’ ticket machines, and by removing a lead seal they could wind back the counters which showed how many tickets had been sold and how much money had to be paid in. In this way a driver was able to understate sales and pocket the difference.  There is an apocryphal story that the scam was discovered because a driver somewhere was winding his machine numbers forwards instead of backwards. This meant, for example, that if he had sold £100 of tickets, and he thought he had wound the machine back to show sales of only £80, he was able to pocket £20. By winding it on instead the takings showed that he was due to pay in £120. By his own wrong manipulations the driver was now £20 short in his takings!

Back in the 1970s Bolton was chosen as a test bed for the advance purchase of discounted tickets. Passengers were able to buy books of 2p tickets at a discount of 33%. which were then used to pay the full fare in lieu of cash. The driver issued a ticket to the value of the sale and at the end of duty paid in a combination of cash and 2p tickets and accounted for sales in terms of cash/tickets taken against value of sales.

I was greeted one morning by the head cashier who informed me that a driver had paid in 100 consecutively-numbered discounted tickets. The driver had bought the tickets himself and then had substituted them for cash taken from passengers. In effect he was buying cash at a 33% discount! He genuinely thought that he had done nothing wrong. I naturally dismissed him and he lost his subsequent appeals.

A very sad occasion had all the ingredients of a Brian Rix farce. The widow of a driver at Bolton who had recently died came into the offices to return her husband’s uniform and other items belonging to the organisation, including what she described as his ‘spare’ ticket machine!

In another spare machine fraud, a driver at one of my Manchester garages stole a ticket machine and doctored it so that tickets printed from the official machine and his ‘spare’ machine showed the same identification number. So if an inspector boarded a bus everything appeared to be in order. The driver would run a series of journeys using his own machine, and then would print off the same number of tickets from the official machine at lower values, and so when the driver paid in his cash takings everything appeared to be in order, and he was in the money. What he hadn’t bargained for was an eagle-eyed Inspector, who picked up a ticket from the floor of the bus and noticed that the ink density was heavier on that ticket than on the tickets held by passengers.

In the early ‘70s the method of revenue collection at many locations amounted to nothing more than an honesty box. ‘Johnson boxes’ involved the passenger placing coins through a slot into a ‘see through’ plastic container in the view of the driver. No ticket was issued and therefore there was no check as to whether the passenger had paid the correct fare. The driver was then required to operate a lever whereupon the cash dropped into a sealed vault.
it will come as no surprise to know that passengers loved the system because in effect they were paving the fare which they deemed appropriate. Drivers loved the system too. Chewing gum stuck on the end of a knitting needle was the favoured option of lifting coins from the plastic container before they had been consigned to the vault.
it was decided, therefore, to introduce ticket machines across the GMPTE network which meant that the Johnson boxes would go and passengers would be issued with a ticket.
A fares increase coincided with the introduction of the ticket machines, and we had calculated the likely level of resistance, which showed that while passengers would be lost, income would increase.
The outcome was devastating. Not only were passengers lost, but income was lower than it had been before.
The reason was simple. Where a passenger had been due to pay say a 4p fare under the old system, and had paid only 2p, an increase from 4p to 5p actually meant a 3p increase. We hadn’t calculated the effect on the large number of people who were paving substantially below the required fare and for whom the increase was two- or threefold! •

www.route-one.net
Thursday 10 January 2013 25
always willing to trade modern UK coins for modern coins from elsewhere....

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #94 on: January 13, 2013, 05:20:48 PM »
Fine period piece. Thanks, andyg!

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline malj1

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #95 on: January 13, 2013, 09:05:06 PM »
That is a great addition to the story of how fares are charged.

However my maths are not up to working out this last paragraph unless they lost a great number of passengers:-

Quote
The outcome was devastating. Not only were passengers lost, but income was lower than it had been before.
The reason was simple. Where a passenger had been due to pay say a 4p fare under the old system, and had paid only 2p, an increase from 4p to 5p actually meant a 3p increase. We hadn’t calculated the effect on the large number of people who were paving substantially below the required fare and for whom the increase was two- or threefold! •
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #96 on: January 15, 2013, 01:06:39 PM »
A hideously fluorescent green 20p that needed heavy computer manipulation before the texts became visible, but with an interesting feature: 90° die rotation! Since it fits with the L (Leicestershire, geddit?), probably thought of as a security feature. 27 mm.

Added 50 p orange.

Peter
« Last Edit: July 17, 2014, 12:18:01 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #97 on: February 17, 2013, 11:42:33 AM »
There are separate posts for tramways tokens, celluloid tokens and miner's bus tokens from Sheffield. Use the index to find them. This post is for non-celluloid, pre-decimal transport department tokens.

Added a six-sided threepence in the same colour as the round variety.
Added a whitish halfpenny.

Peter
« Last Edit: September 08, 2014, 08:32:37 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #98 on: February 17, 2013, 03:23:14 PM »
I have good memories of Dundee, ranging from an outstanding garden, high up on a hill, to the hulk of a three-master down below. Here is an additional one. A 22.5 white fiber penny (no, it's not ivory ;)) with a long-suffering (where have all the flowers gone, as Marlène Dietrich sang) coat of arms.

For the Dundee Tramway tokens look here

Peter

Added 2, 3 and 6 pence.
« Last Edit: July 19, 2014, 06:55:58 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline @josephjk

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #99 on: February 17, 2013, 03:31:09 PM »
What is "fiber" Peter? Is it a kind of plastic or a resin?

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #100 on: February 17, 2013, 04:02:56 PM »
I have used fiber as a neutral word for an artificial material. The token probably dates from sometime between the two world worlds, so it's too easy to call it plastic. Plastic was known from 1908, but plastic mass-produced products mostly date from (well) after 1945, e.g. I grew up in the 50s and 60s without plastic toys.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline malj1

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #101 on: February 18, 2013, 11:50:24 AM »
5 Y.E.B 1½D 25mm Blue plastic. Smith & Smith, Wakefield 800 BF

Used by employees of the Yorkshire Electricity Board.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Offline malj1

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #102 on: February 18, 2013, 12:00:12 PM »
YORKSHIRE (W.D.) ELECTRIC TRAMWAYS LD 1½D 22mm white plastic Dewsbury 242 AJ

YORKSHIRE W.D. TRANSPORT CO LTD  3D 22mm lemon plastic Dewsbury 242 BT

W.D. = Woollen District
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.


Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #104 on: February 18, 2013, 08:02:08 PM »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.