Author Topic: Bimetallic Coins: Fractional Denominations  (Read 4573 times)

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Offline Bimat

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Bimetallic Coins: Fractional Denominations
« on: February 11, 2012, 03:47:41 PM »
Not as common as 'normal' bimetallic coins. ;)

New Zealand 50 Cents.



Aditya
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Offline Bimat

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Bimetallic Coins: Fractional Denominations
« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2012, 03:48:39 PM »
Sudan 20 Piastres (2006).



Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline Bimat

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Bimetallic Coins: Fractional Denominations
« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2012, 03:49:31 PM »
Sudan 50 Piastres (2006).



Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline Prosit

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Re: Bimetallic Coins: Fractional Denominations
« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2012, 04:18:01 PM »
So what is the smallest denomination most worthless bimetallic coin in the world?  Seems bimetallics usually are for the more valuable denominations...

Dale

Offline Bimat

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Bimetallic Coins: Fractional Denominations
« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2012, 04:18:56 PM »
So what is the smallest denomination most worthless bimetallic coin in the world?  Seems bimetallics usually are for the more valuable denominations...

Zimbabwean $5?

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline augsburger

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Re: Bimetallic Coins: Fractional Denominations
« Reply #5 on: February 13, 2012, 10:57:15 AM »
Chocolate money?  :o

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Bimetallic Coins: Fractional Denominations
« Reply #6 on: February 13, 2012, 11:43:57 AM »
I find calling chocolate a metal unacceptable, though it may be the case in China :) So far, my worst experience with chocolate was on Moscow airport, though. :-X

Anyway, the face value of the Zimbabwean coin is far less.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Bimat

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Bimetallic Coins: Fractional Denominations
« Reply #7 on: February 13, 2012, 03:46:44 PM »
Turkey 50 Yeni Kurus (2005-2007):



Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline Bimat

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Bimetallic Coins: Fractional Denominations
« Reply #8 on: February 13, 2012, 03:47:50 PM »
Turkey 50 Kurus (2009-2011):



Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline SquareEarth

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Re: Bimetallic Coins: Fractional Denominations
« Reply #9 on: September 16, 2013, 10:48:01 PM »
Bimetallic coins have a much older history then I first thought of.

1792 US cent
Silver centered cent.
Tong Bao_Tsuho_Tong Bo_Thong Bao

Offline FosseWay

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Re: Bimetallic Coins: Fractional Denominations
« Reply #10 on: September 17, 2013, 06:23:43 PM »
They're even older than that - here's an English tin farthing with copper centre from 1684 (the date is on the edge). Picture from Tony Clayton's site.


Offline chrisild

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Re: Bimetallic Coins: Fractional Denominations
« Reply #11 on: September 17, 2013, 07:21:49 PM »
Of course bimetallic issues are not a recent "invention". But in my opinion those early examples, whether ancient Roman tokens or later trial (and similarly short lived) pieces, are still different as they did not establish any kind of "continuity". It was the Italian 500 lire coin, first issued a little more than 30 years ago, that ultimately brought the change, in the sense that bimetallic coins have been in use since then ... But I agree, lower denominations tend to have one metal - or rather color - only, because the issue of counterfeited coins is not that relevant in those cases.

Christian