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Malta: decimal variations

Started by <k>, November 24, 2011, 06:51:31 PM

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<k>

Until 1971 Malta used the UK pound sterling, but in 1972 it issued its own national coinage. In this topic I will show you some of the alternative designs suggested for the coinage that were never ultimately used. In the first part of the topic I will post the designs suggested by the renowned Maltese artist, Emvin Cremona, whilst the second part will be devoted to the designs created by the English artist and engraver, Christopher Ironside.

To reacquaint yourself with Malta's pre-euro coinage, click on the link below:

Malta's pre-euro coinage, 1972-2007
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#1

Emvin Cremona was a renowned Maltese artist who specialised in painting. He was born in 1919 and died in 1987. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, he prepared some designs for a suggested national coinage for Malta. The designs illustrated in the first part of this topic come from the Royal Mint documents to be found in the National Archives, London. They are copyright of the National Archives, and the document reference is MINT 20/4181, entitled: "Malta: coinage policy; designs for new decimal coins", covering the dates 1968 Jan 01 to 1971 Dec 31.

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#2


Mr Cremona's ½c shows a bee on a honeycomb.







His 1c design depicts an item of ancient Maltese earthenware.







His 2c design features an altar offering in the Temple of Hagar Qim.

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#3
Mr Cremona provided three alternative designs for the 5c coin.




Details from the Maltese coat of arms.







An unidentified Maltese church.







A warship of the Knights of Malta.

 
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#4
Mr Cremona provided two alternative designs for the 10c coin.




A map of the islands with the George Cross and a stylised compass.







The Maltese coat of arms.

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#5

Christopher Ironside was a highly versatile English artist and designer. He was born in 1913 and died in 1992. In the world of numismatics he is best known for creating the reverse designs for the UK's first decimal coinage, though he also designed coins for many other countries. In the early 1970s he prepared and modelled the designs for Malta's first modern national coinage. The designs illustrated in this second part of the topic come from the Royal Mint documents to be found in the National Archives, London. They are copyright of the National Archives, and the document reference is MINT 20/4182, entitled: "Malta: coinage policy; designs for new decimal coins", covering the dates 1971 Jan 01 to 1971 Dec 31.

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#6


Mr Ironside's initial sketch for the 3 mils design depicts three honeybees.







Here is Mr Ironside's final sketch, alongside the finished 3 mils coin.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#7


This is Mr Ironside's attractive sketch of a Norman window, which was originally intended for the 5 mils coin.






Here is Mr Ironside's sketch of the earthen lampstand that appeared on the finished 5 mils coin.






The actual 5 mils coin.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#8


Mr Ironside's sketch of the reverse of the 3 mils coin, alongside the finished article.







Mr Ironside's sketch of the reverse of the 5 cents coin, alongside the finished article.

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#9
 

Mr Ironside's sketch of Penthesilea, Queen of the Amazons, used on the eventual 2 cents coin.

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#10
 

Mr Ironside's sketch of the floral altar in the Temple of Hagar Qim, which appeared on the eventual 5 cents coin.

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#11


Mr Ironside's sketch of the Barge of the Grand Master for the 5 cents coin.





The issued coin.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#12




Mr Ironside's sketch of the Great Siege Monument, which depicts allegorical representations of Fortitude, Hope and Faith.

This design appeared on the 50 cents coin.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#13


Mr Ironside's design of the Maltese coat of arms, with dolphin supporters.

It was originally intended as the obverse for all the circulation coins.

It was not used, but a somewhat similar design appeared on the reverse of the collector two pounds coin of 1972.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#14


This effigy of Queen Elizabeth II by Arnold Machin was apparently intended as the obverse design of the Maltese circulation coins.

It is dated 1970, while the actual circulation coinage was issued in 1972 and dated as such.

Although Malta is a member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the Queen has never appeared on any of Malta's coins.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.