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Saudi 1936 Riyal

Started by Md. Shariful Islam, October 19, 2011, 06:09:32 PM

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Md. Shariful Islam

Here is my 1936 Saudi Arabia Riyal.

Figleaf

I found the following translations of the inscriptions on the net:

obv: within pearl circle: The King of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, around: Abdul Aziz Son of Adul Rahman, Son of Al Sand Ali.
rev: Struck In Makkah Al-Mu Kavma


The description seems incomplete and Al Sand Ali should have been Faisal. Can you confirm or read more?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Harald

Obv (with the swords):
King of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia - 'Abdul'aziz bin 'Abdulrahman al Sa'ud

Rev (with numeral "1"):
one Sa'udi Arabian Riyal - struck in Mekka, the Magnificent (al Makka al Mukarrama)

cheers
--
Harald
http://www.liganda.ch (monetary history & numismatic linguistics)

Figleaf

An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Md. Shariful Islam

Thanks to both Peter and Herald.

Islam

Prosit

I saw a movie recently where in the 1920's or maybe early 1930's a person bought a slave in (I think it was Tangier) for 500 Riyals.
Was that a lot of money?

Sorry for posting this here..

Dale

Md. Shariful Islam

Quote from: Prosit on October 24, 2011, 01:27:35 AM
I saw a movie recently where in the 1920's or maybe early 1930's a person bought a slave in (I think it was Tangier) for 500 Riyals.
Was that a lot of money?

Sorry for posting this here..

Dale


Since under Bi metallic standard value of money meant its silver or gold content what I understand is 500 Riyal of that time means somewhere around 500 Riyal* $31 = $15500. That's not a small amount.

The coin is well preserved now means God has saved the coin for some reason. I hope it was used for freeing a slave instead.

Islam

Figleaf

Quote from: Prosit on October 24, 2011, 01:27:35 AM
I saw a movie recently where in the 1920's or maybe early 1930's a person bought a slave in (I think it was Tangier) for 500 Riyals. Was that a lot of money?

No. It was a lot of bull ;D By 1920 or so, slavery had long been abolished in the French colonies. While North African Arabs continued the trade for a few more decades, the rich generally didn't have slaves themselves, but rather thought of ways to keep women in bondage and men owing money to them, amounting to much the same.

Riyals can refer to different coins, ranging from English (or was it Scottish?) gold to Spanish silver (reales) to Portuguese copper (reis). In Portuguese money it would be a pittance and not in circulation in North Africa. In English money it would be a huge sum as well as a huge anachronism. In Spanish silver it would be 62 pesos 4 reales. It is difficult to make an accurate conversion in time, but if you are willing to let the peso be roughly 80 dollarcents (you can play with the rate, or use a pure silver content conversion rate) it represents $50, which would be around 6 weeks to two months wages in the US at that time. To get your Spanish silver accepted, you'd have to be deep in the desert and far from the French, though.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Prosit

I didn't pay tht close attention as to the country but there were British there but no French that I saw.
The slaves were kidnapped and taken into the desert to a different town where apparantly no non-native officials
were.  I do remmeber seing a native ruler not British or French.  Doubt I will ever watch that again but if I do I will pay more attention

I don't expect movies to be factual but was curious as to how much money that might be.  I do remember the transaction
was paper currency.

Dale


Quote from: Figleaf on October 24, 2011, 04:53:08 PM
No. It was a lot of bull ;D By 1920 or so, slavery had long been abolished in the French colonies. While North African Arabs continued the trade for a few more decades, the rich generally didn't have slaves themselves, but rather thought of ways to keep women in bondage and men owing money to them, amounting to much the same.

Riyals can refer to different coins, ranging from English (or was it Scottish?) gold to Spanish silver (reales) to Portuguese copper (reis). In Portuguese money it would be a pittance and not in circulation in North Africa. In English money it would be a huge sum as well as a huge anachronism. In Spanish silver it would be 62 pesos 4 reales. It is difficult to make an accurate conversion in time, but if you are willing to let the peso be roughly 80 dollarcents (you can play with the rate, or use a pure silver content conversion rate) it represents $50, which would be around 6 weeks to two months wages in the US at that time. To get your Spanish silver accepted, you'd have to be deep in the desert and far from the French, though.

Peter