News:

Sign up for the monthly zoom events by sending a PM with your email address to Hitesh

Main Menu

Libya: unadopted designs of 1959

Started by <k>, September 27, 2011, 08:52:51 PM

Previous topic - Next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

<k>

LIBYA: UNADOPTED DESIGNS OF 1959

In 1959 the Libyan government contacted the Royal Mint (UK).

It asked the Royal Mint to prepare some possible designs for a new coinage.


Here I show the designs that were considered.

Also included are the remarks of the Royal Mint Advisory Committee.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#1
Libya 1959-X.jpg

Image © Royal Mint Museum.


The common obverse.

A sketch, prepared in the Royal Mint, of the Arms of Libya.

It includes the words "The United Kingdom of Libya" in Arabic.


Response from the Royal Mint Advisory Committee

The Committee decided not to offer any recommendation regarding the common obverse design. The President's immediate reaction to it was that the inclusion of the crown spoiled what might otherwise have been a truly circular design. It was explained by the Secretary, however, that the crown was an integral part of the Arms of Libya and could not therefore be omitted.

NOTE: The President refers to Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, The President of the Royal Mint Advisory Committee.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Libya-A.jpg

Image © Royal Mint Museum.


10 mils. The Fort at Brak.

Sketch by Humphrey Paget.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#3
Libya-B.jpg

Image © Royal Mint Museum.


10 milliemes. The Fort at Brak.

Sketch by Humphrey Paget.


Response from the Royal Mint Advisory Committee

It was noted that the proposed arrangement of the inscription would be most difficult to apply to the 10 milliemes design, but it was thought that a satisfactory solution might be found if the Fort were placed lower on the coin and drawn from a different aspect. The President suggested that the addition of a flag and flagstaff might be considered.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Libya-Q3.jpg

Image © Royal Mint Museum.


20 mils.  The Columns at Cyrene.

Sketch by Humphrey Paget.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Libya-Q4.jpg

Image © Royal Mint Museum.


20 milliemes.  The Columns at Cyrene.

Sketch by Humphrey Paget.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Libya-Q1.jpg

Image © Royal Mint Museum.


50 mils.  The Arch of Trajan.

Sketch by Humphrey Paget.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Libya-Q2.jpg

Image © Royal Mint Museum.


50 milliemes.  The Arch of Trajan.

Sketch by Humphrey Paget.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Libya-1.jpg

Image © Royal Mint Museum.


Proposed obverse design.

Sketch by Humphrey Paget.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Libya-2.jpg

Image © Royal Mint Museum.


Proposed obverse design.

Sketch by Humphrey Paget.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Libya-3.jpg

Image © Royal Mint Museum.


Proposed obverse design.

Sketch by Humphrey Paget.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#11
Libya-4.jpg

Image © Royal Mint Museum.


Proposed obverse design.

Sketch by Humphrey Paget.


Response from the Royal Mint Advisory Committee

The Deputy Master informed members that Libya has having a new coinage consisting of seven denominations, and as the King had intimated that he did not wish his effigy to appear on then, it was necessary to prepare new obverse designs. The reverses would be merely the values in the form of a numeral. Mr. T. H. Paget had prepared four designs showing various well-known ruins in Libya, and from these not less than two nor more than three would be chosen by the Libyan Government.

The Committee thought the designs good, except for the fourth one, which was in two planes and was considered unsuitable for a coin. It could be improved by making the two tombs of equal size, thus avoiding the necessity for perspective.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Libya 1959-C.jpg



Libya 1959-D.jpg



Libya 1959-E.jpg

Images © Royal Mint Museum.


1, 2 and 5 milliemes.

Sketches by Mr. Ayres.


Response from the Royal Mint Advisory Committee

It was unanimously agreed that the designs for the three lowest denominations would be improved by the removal of the circle which appeared just inside the inscription. Attention was drawn to inconsistencies in the use of a grave accent over the 'e' in milliemes.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Libya 5 milliemes sketch.jpg

Image © Royal Mint Museum.


A sketch of a proposed design for a Libyan five milliemes coin.

It depicts an armoured horseman. No further details were given.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Libya 1959-XX.jpg

Image © Royal Mint Museum.

Model by Paul Vincze.


Response from the Royal Mint Advisory Committee

Mr. Vincze's design for the 100 milliemes reverse was generally praised, and though some members had slight misgivings over the position of the horse's hind legs, it was decided not to recommend any changes. Mr. Lambert thought that the design might be a little improved if the Arabic inscription were moved slightly clockwise, though he agreed with Sir Francis Meynell that this might bring the two dots under the last character of the inscription into too close proximity with the horse's knee.

Mr. Darwin drew attention to the difference in character between the design for the 100 milliemes and those for the lower denominations. Members agreed with the President that uniformity of lettering and of arrangement of the inscriptions would help to overcome this difference. It was accordingly decided to recommend that the inscriptions on the lower denominations should be revised so as to conform with the arrangement of those on the 100, 50 and 20 milliemes. Sir Francis Meynell said that Mr. Paget's lettering was the best of those illustrated.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.