Milestones in the decimal coinage of Jersey

Started by <k>, September 11, 2011, 08:56:13 PM

Previous topic - Next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

<k>

To post comments, criticisms, amendments etc. regarding this topic, please click on the link below:

Comments on "Milestones in the decimal coinage of Jersey"
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#1

Channel Islands


The Channel Islands (French: Îles Anglo-Normandes or Îles de la Manche) are an archipelago of British Crown Dependencies in the English Channel, off the French coast of Normandy. They include two separate bailiwicks: the Bailiwick of Jersey and the Bailiwick of Guernsey. They are considered the remnants of the Duchy of Normandy and are not part of the United Kingdom.

Both Bailiwicks have been administered separately since the late 13th century; each has its own independent laws, elections, and representative bodies (although in modern times, politicians from the islands' legislatures are in regular contact). Any institution common to both is the exception rather than the rule.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#2

Jersey


Jersey is a semi-autonomous Crown Dependency of the UK.

It is located off the North West coast of France.


The island has a population of around 98,000, and its capital is St Helier.

It is the largest of all the Channel Islands.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#3

Jersey Coat of Arms.


The coat of arms of Jersey is a red shield with three gold leopards.

It is very similar to the arms of Normandy, Guernsey and England.

It derives from the seal granted to the island's bailiff by Edward I in 1279.


In 1907 Edward VII sanctioned the claimed usage by the island of the arms.

Since 1981, the arms have been included in the flag of Jersey.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#4


Jersey's flag.


The flag of Jersey is composed of a red saltire on a white field.

In the upper quadrant, the badge of Jersey is surmounted by a yellow "Plantagenet crown".


The flag was adopted by the States of Jersey on June 12, 1979.

It was first officially hoisted on April 7, 1981.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#5

Jersey: 1/12 of one shilling, 1964.


Jersey has had its own coinage in an unbroken line since 1841. Jersey uses a "currency board-like" arrangement for its currency - though the island authorities are not completely transparent about their financial arrangements. This means that the Jersey pound is in effect a separate currency from the UK pound sterling, but its value is kept at par with its UK counterpart.

In the 1960s, Jersey's pre-decimal circulation coinage consisted of only two coins: one twelfth of a shilling (equivalent to a British penny) and one fourth of a shilling, the equivalent of a British threepence (3d). To read about some possible reasons for this, see: The Channel Islands' limited predecimal range. The coins and banknotes of the UK and Guernsey were (and still are) also legal tender on Jersey, where they circulate in large numbers.

Before decimalisation, Jersey, being a crown dependency was required to use the crowned effigy of the Queen on its coins. The effigy was the work of Cecil Thomas. The UK and the Commonwealth realms used the uncrowned effigy by Mary Gillick, whilst Britain's overseas territories (formerly known as colonies) and its dependencies,  were required to use the crowned effigy.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#6

The Machin effigy appears on the obverse of all Jersey's decimal coins.




Five pence coin, 1968.




Ten pence coin, 1968.


In 1968  - and in line with the UK - in order to begin to familiarise the public with the decimal system, Jersey introduced circulation 5 pence and 10 pence coins. These co-circulated with the UK shilling and two shilling coins and the UK 5 pence and 10 pence coins. Five pence was equivalent to a shilling, ten pence to two shillings. Both coins included the word "NEW" in the denominational legend, in order to distinguish them from "old" pre-decimal pence.

Jersey used the new Arnold Machin effigy of Queen Elizabeth on the new coins, just like the UK. The previous hierarchy of the crowned and uncrowned effigies was swept away. The Jersey coat of arms appeared on the reverse of both coins, just as it had done on Jersey's pre-decimal coins.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#7
Jersey 50p  1969.jpg

The 50 pence coin of 1969.


In 1969 the 50 pence coin was introduced. This served two purposes: to replace the ten shilling banknote, and to get the public used to another decimal coin before decimalisation occurred in 1971. The reverse design of the coin again featured the Jersey coat of arms. The UK also introduced its own 50 pence coin in 1969.

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#8


The decimal half penny.


On the 15th February 1971, Jersey went decimal, along with the UK, and the new halfpenny, penny and two pence coins were now introduced into circulation. Because the other three decimal coins had already been introduced, the process went very smoothly. The reverses of all the decimal coins showed the Jersey coat of arms.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#9

The reverses of the decimal penny and two pence coins.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#10



In 1981, Jersey removed the word "NEW" from the legends on its coins.

It also changed the position of the year on the design.


The UK removed the word "NEW" from its coins in 1982.

These Jersey coins were issued in 1981 only.


From 1982 onwards Jersey replaced its reverse designs with new thematic ones.


1981 was also the final year of issue of the Jersey half penny.

The UK issued its final half penny in 1983.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#11


In 1982 the UK introduced a new circulating denomination, the 20 pence coin. Jersey followed suit in the same year, issuing a 20 pence coin whose reverse depicted the lighthouse at La Corbière. The design was created and modelled by Royal Mint engraver Robert Lowe, and it commemorated the 100th anniversary of the lighthouse. The 20 pence coin was the only circulation coin that Jersey issued in 1982.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#12

The UK 20 pence coin surface has a wide rim.


The Jersey 20p coin has a narrow rim unlike the UK version, which has a wide rim

Above is an image of the UK 20 pence coin for comparison.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

In 1983 Jersey issued a new design series of coins. These designs depicted local landmarks and were designed by Royal Mint engraver Robert Lowe. Jersey also introduced a circulating pound coin for the first time in 1983, in line with the UK.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#14


One penny.  The watch tower at Le Hocq.


From Wikipedia:

Le Hocq is a Jèrriais name, and means 'the headland' or 'the cape' in English. It is in fact the area surrounding a small headland. On this headland rests a Jersey Round Tower, built as a fortification against the French in the 17th/18th century (full details can be found on the informative signpost just in front of the tower). This tower is uninhabited, apart from some birds who tend to flock in and around it.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.