Author Topic: Milestones in the decimal coinage of Guernsey  (Read 19634 times)

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Offline <k>

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Milestones in the decimal coinage of Guernsey
« on: September 09, 2011, 06:36:34 PM »
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See also: Alderney.

 
« Last Edit: September 10, 2016, 03:14:32 PM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Milestones in the decimal coinage of Guernsey
« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2016, 09:47:57 PM »

England, the Channel Islands, and France.

 
« Last Edit: June 30, 2017, 09:58:32 PM by <k> »
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Re: Milestones in the decimal coinage of Guernsey
« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2016, 09:50:13 PM »

The Channel Islands.



From Wikipedia:

The Channel Islands (French: Îles Anglo-Normandes or Îles de la Manche) are an archipelago of British Crown Dependencies in the English Channel, off the French coast of Normandy. They include two separate bailiwicks (headed by a bailiff): the Bailiwick of Jersey and the Bailiwick of Guernsey. They are considered the remnants of the Duchy of Normandy, and are not part of the United Kingdom. They have a total population of about 168,000 and their respective capitals, Saint Peter Port and Saint Helier, have populations of 16,488 and 33,500, respectively. The total area of the islands is 194 km2.

Both Bailiwicks have been administered separately since the late 13th century; each has its own independent laws, elections, and representative bodies (although in modern times, politicians from the islands' legislatures are in regular contact). Any institution common to both is the exception rather than the rule.

 
« Last Edit: July 01, 2017, 02:07:52 PM by <k> »
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Re: Milestones in the decimal coinage of Guernsey
« Reply #3 on: June 10, 2016, 09:53:26 PM »

Guernsey.



Guernsey is a semi-autonomous Crown Dependency of the UK, located off the North West coast of France. In 2014 it had an estimated population of 65,849. Guernsey has various dependencies: the private and/or non-inhabited ones are Jethou, Brecqhou and Lihou; the public and inhabited ones are Alderney, Sark and Herm. Alderney and Sark are autonomous dependencies of Guernsey, whilst Herm is directly governed by Guernsey.

 
« Last Edit: July 01, 2017, 02:07:21 PM by <k> »
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Re: Milestones in the decimal coinage of Guernsey
« Reply #4 on: June 10, 2016, 09:56:20 PM »

The flag of Guernsey.



The flag of Guernsey was adopted in 1985 and consists of the red cross of St. George with an additional gold cross within it. The change was prompted by confusion at international sporting events over competitors from Guernsey and England using the same flag. It was designed by the Guernsey Flag Investigation Committee and first flew in the island on 15 February 1985. The gold cross represents Duke William of Normandy, who, it is claimed, had such a cross on his flag in the Battle of Hastings, given to him by Pope Alexander II.

 
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Re: Milestones in the decimal coinage of Guernsey
« Reply #5 on: June 10, 2016, 09:58:36 PM »

Guernsey's coat of arms.



The coat of arms of Guernsey is the official symbol of the Channel Island of Guernsey. It is a red shield with three gold lions (historically described as leopards)surmounted by a small branch of leaves. It is very similar to the arms of Normandy, Jersey and England.

 
« Last Edit: July 01, 2017, 02:06:32 PM by <k> »
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Re: Milestones in the decimal coinage of Guernsey
« Reply #6 on: June 10, 2016, 10:00:55 PM »




Guernsey's final pre-decimal coin series was designed in 1956.



Guernsey has had its own coinage in an unbroken line since 1830. Research has shown that Guernsey uses a "currency board-like" arrangement for its currency - the island authorities are not completely transparent about Guernsey's financial arrangements. This means that the Guernsey pound is in effect a separate currency from the UK pound sterling, but its value is kept at par with its UK counterpart. The coins of Jersey and the UK also circulate in Guernsey, and they are legal tender there.

In the 1960s, Guernsey's pre-decimal coinage consisted of only three coins: 4 doubles (equivalent to a British pre-decimal halfpenny), 8 doubles and three pence. The 4 and 8 doubles were of the same size, weight and metal content as the UK halfpenny and penny respectively, but the three pence coin was scalloped and made of cupro-nickel. To read about some possible reasons for the limted range of coins, see: The Channel Islands' limited predecimal range.The coins and banknotes of the UK and Jersey were (and still are) also legal tender on Guernsey. Unlike the UK and Jersey, Guernsey's coins depicted the Guernsey coat of arms on their obverse instead of Queen Elizabeth II.

 
« Last Edit: June 30, 2017, 10:05:19 PM by <k> »
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Re: Milestones in the decimal coinage of Guernsey
« Reply #7 on: June 10, 2016, 10:14:48 PM »

The reverse of Guernsey's 1968 five pence coin features a Guernsey lily.



In 1968 and in line with the UK, and in order to begin to familiarise the public with the decimal system, Guernsey introduced circulation 5 pence and 10 pence coins. These co-circulated with the UK shilling and two shilling coins and the UK 5 pence and 10 pence coins. Five pence was equivalent to a shilling, ten pence to two shillings. Both coins included the word "NEW" in the denominational legend, in order to distinguish them from "old" pre-decimal pence.

 
« Last Edit: June 11, 2016, 05:15:32 PM by <k> »
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Re: Milestones in the decimal coinage of Guernsey
« Reply #8 on: June 10, 2016, 10:16:27 PM »



The 10 pence coin featured a Guernsey cow.

 
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Re: Milestones in the decimal coinage of Guernsey
« Reply #9 on: June 10, 2016, 10:18:16 PM »



The common obverse featured Guernsey's coat of arms. The obverse legend, "S. BALLIVIE INSVLE DE GERNEREVE" is Norman French for "Seal of the Bailiwick of the Island of Guernsey".
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Re: Milestones in the decimal coinage of Guernsey
« Reply #10 on: June 10, 2016, 10:33:03 PM »



In 1969 the 50 pence coin was introduced. This served two purposes: to replace the ten shilling banknote, and to get the public used to another decimal coin before decimalisation occurred in 1971. Like the UK 50 pence, the Guernsey coin was heptagonal.

The reverse design of the coin depicts the ducal cap of the Duke of Normandy. This design was created by Sir Anthony Wagner.
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Re: Milestones in the decimal coinage of Guernsey
« Reply #11 on: June 10, 2016, 10:34:33 PM »



A proof version, dated 1971, of the 50 pence coin.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Milestones in the decimal coinage of Guernsey
« Reply #12 on: June 10, 2016, 10:46:36 PM »

The reverse of the decimal half penny.



On the 15th February 1971, Guernsey went decimal, along with the UK, and the new halfpenny, penny and two pence coins were now introduced into circulation. Because the other three decimal coins had already been introduced, the process went very smoothly.

The reverses of all the decimal coins, except for that of the 50 pence coin, were designed by Paul Vincze of the Royal Mint, UK. Mr Vincze had also designed the reverses of some of the Guernsey predecimal coins, which can be seen on the coins of 1956 and later.
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Re: Milestones in the decimal coinage of Guernsey
« Reply #13 on: June 10, 2016, 10:53:24 PM »



The penny featured a gannet (Morus bassanus). Alderney is host to hundreds of these birds.

 
« Last Edit: June 23, 2016, 06:40:07 PM by <k> »
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Re: Milestones in the decimal coinage of Guernsey
« Reply #14 on: June 10, 2016, 10:54:31 PM »

A gannet in flight.

 
« Last Edit: June 30, 2017, 10:07:13 PM by <k> »
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