Author Topic: Is there a story behind this Russian coin?  (Read 1198 times)

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Offline kumarrahul

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Is there a story behind this Russian coin?
« on: August 29, 2011, 06:00:01 PM »
My cousin's grandmother was Russian... my grandfather having fallen in love with her when studying in Moscow... the two coins below (and a few others as well).. were given to me by my grandfather.. i vaguely remember him reciting a story saying that the 50 kopecks silver coins were forcibly removed from circulation, and hence the second coin here has a slit cut into it.. thereby defacing the coin...

I am really interested to know if there is really some truth in this story behind these coins.. One more thing that intrigues me for this coin that is unlike other co-existing Russian coins.. where is the denomination indicated on the coin?


Online Figleaf

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Re: Is there a story behind this Russian coin?
« Reply #1 on: August 29, 2011, 11:40:01 PM »
All I can tell you is that the slit in this coin seems to have been made by a saw. That would be a very unusual way to cancel a coin. Usually, a large scratch or two scratches are used. A slit requires a hardened saw and much energy. In view of the edge damage, I wonder if the coin wasn't made into a tool, a handle to turn something, maybe?

As for the domination, it is on the coin. Below the emblem, you find the text один полтинник, which means one poltinnik (half rouble.)

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline kumarrahul

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Re: Is there a story behind this Russian coin?
« Reply #2 on: August 30, 2011, 04:41:02 AM »
Thanks Peter.. your analysis is quite plausible.. almost detective-like :-)

Offline bart

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Re: Is there a story behind this Russian coin?
« Reply #3 on: August 30, 2011, 08:56:16 AM »
The denomination of your coin is just beneath the state arms: it says ODIN (=one) POLTINNIK, a poltinnik being a half rouble or 50 kopeks. The weight of your coin is written on the edge (in old Russian units (1924) or in grams (1925-27)
Around the arms is the marxist motto: Proletarians of all countries: Unite!

Bart