Author Topic: Soviet Union 5 kopek 1924  (Read 3180 times)

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Offline bart

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Soviet Union 5 kopek 1924
« on: January 02, 2008, 11:07:49 PM »
Here's another one I found in Prague, a one-year-type 5 kopeks of the first emission in the name of the Soviet Union. Before this emission coins were issued in the name of the Russian Socialist Federated Soviet republic. On this coin appears the CCCP-mark : Union of the Socialistic Soviet republics.
The legends are giving one of Karl Marx's most known quotes: "Proletarians of all nations: unite!"

I was very lucky to find it, as, despite of its huge mintage numbers, it is quite difficult to find.

Bart
« Last Edit: January 02, 2008, 11:09:24 PM by bart »

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Soviet Union 5 kopek 1924
« Reply #1 on: January 03, 2008, 12:02:15 AM »
Continuing the Czarist tradition, this is a BIG coin. That's the reason it's so difficult to find: copper prices tend to rise extremely quickly in war time. Even in the rich, faraway United States, copper pennies were temporarily struck in brass and in the occupied European countries, copper issues stopped altogether.

IMHO this is also one of the best designed and executed coins under communism, struck at a time that Winston Churchill made complimentary remarks about Stalin in his diary.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

translateltd

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Re: Soviet Union 5 kopek 1924
« Reply #2 on: January 03, 2008, 07:11:02 PM »
A nice item, definitely - I'm quite a fan of large copper pieces myself.  The slogan "Workers of the World, Unite!" was used on numerous Soviet banknotes, too, including a famous series known as "Babel notes" because the slogan was printed in so many different languages, presumably all the better to get the message across!

Offline Gusev

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Re: Soviet Union 5 kopek 1924
« Reply #3 on: May 01, 2017, 06:10:21 PM »
The slogan "Workers of the World, Unite!" was used on numerous Soviet banknotes, too, including a famous series known as "Babel notes" because the slogan was printed in so many different languages, presumably all the better to get the message across!

This slogan was never written on banknotes.
In different languages written denomination. :o
"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Soviet Union 5 kopek 1924
« Reply #4 on: May 02, 2017, 12:04:08 AM »
Interesting to see that карбованець, manat and сўм are acceptable equivalents of рубль.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Soviet Union 5 kopek 1924
« Reply #5 on: May 02, 2017, 01:16:37 AM »
This slogan was never written on banknotes.

Hmm, maybe not on USSR paper money. But some Russian revolutionary notes have it - in six languages. See here for example; there is also a 250 ruble note with the slogan, maybe others too ...

Christian

Offline Gusev

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Re: Soviet Union 5 kopek 1924
« Reply #6 on: May 02, 2017, 09:44:12 AM »
Thank you, chrisild.
Yes, it was after the Bolshevik revolution in October 1917.
They were called "Sovznaks" (Russian: совзнак) were promissory notes issued in Soviet Russia in 1919 and used during 1919-1924. The name is an abbreviation of the expression "Sovetskiye znaki" (Советские знаки, Soviet tokens), which in its turn was an abbreviation of the official terms (советские казначейские знаки, расчётные знаки РСФСР, денежные знаки РСФСР). They were the de facto money of the time. The term "token" was an euphemism for "money", since communism was supposed to abolish money  ;D ;D ;D, and sovznaks were considered to be a temporary, transitional instrument.
The slogan was written in Russian, German, French, English, Italian, Chinese and Arabic.
"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.